• We present a thermal emission spectrum of the bloated hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab from a single eclipse observation made in spatial scan mode with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spectrum covers the wavelength regime from 1.123 to 1.644 microns which is binned into 14 eclipse depths measured to an averaged precision of 104 parts-per million. The spectrum is unaffected by a dilution from the close M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B, which was fully resolved. We complemented our spectrum with literature results and performed a comparative forward and retrieval analysis with the 1D radiative-convective ATMO model. Assuming solar abundance of the planet atmosphere, we find that the measured spectrum can best be explained by the spectrum of a blackbody isothermal atmosphere with Tp = 1995 +/- 17K, but can equally-well be described by a spectrum with modest thermal inversion. The retrieved spectrum suggests emission from VO at the WFC3 wavelengths and no evidence of the 1.4 micron water feature. The emission models with temperature profiles decreasing with height are rejected at a high confidence. An isothermal or inverted spectrum can imply a clear atmosphere with an absorber, a dusty cloud deck or a combination of both. We find that the planet can have continuum of values for the albedo and recirculation, ranging from high albedo and poor recirculation to low albedo and efficient recirculation. Optical spectroscopy of the planet's day-side or thermal emission phase curves can potentially resolve the current albedo with recirculation degeneracy.
  • We present results from the first observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Panchromatic Comparative Exoplanet Treasury (PanCET) program for WASP-101b, a highly inflated hot Jupiter and one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Early Release Science (ERS) program. From a single HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observation, we find that the near-infrared transmission spectrum of WASP-101b contains no significant H$_2$O absorption features and we rule out a clear atmosphere at 13{\sigma}. Therefore, WASP-101b is not an optimum target for a JWST ERS program aimed at observing strong molecular transmission features. We compare WASP-101b to the well studied and nearly identical hot Jupiter WASP-31b. These twin planets show similar temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric features in the near-infrared. We suggest exoplanets in the same parameter space as WASP-101b and WASP-31b will also exhibit cloudy transmission spectral features. For future HST exoplanet studies, our analysis also suggests that a lower count limit needs to be exceeded per pixel on the detector in order to avoid unwanted instrumental systematics.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-IR transmission spectra of the transiting hot-Jupiter WASP-31b. The spectrum covers 0.3-1.7 $\mu$m at a resolution $R\sim$70, which we combine with Spitzer photometry to cover the full-optical to IR. The spectrum is dominated by a cloud-deck with a flat transmission spectrum which is apparent at wavelengths $>0.52\mu$m. The cloud deck is present at high altitudes and low pressures, as it covers the majority of the expected optical Na line and near-IR H$_2$O features. While Na I absorption is not clearly identified, the resulting spectrum does show a very strong potassium feature detected at the 4.2-$\sigma$ confidence level. Broadened alkali wings are not detected, indicating pressures below $\sim$10 mbar. The lack of Na and strong K is the first indication of a sub-solar Na/K abundance ratio in a planetary atmosphere (ln[Na/K]$=-3.3\pm2.8$), which could potentially be explained by Na condensation on the planet's night side, or primordial abundance variations. A strong Rayleigh scattering signature is detected at short wavelengths, with a 4-$\sigma$ significant slope. Two distinct aerosol size populations can explain the spectra, with a smaller sub-micron size grain population reaching high altitudes producing a blue Rayleigh scattering signature on top of a larger, lower-lying population responsible for the flat cloud deck at longer wavelengths. We estimate that the atmospheric circulation is sufficiently strong to mix micron size particles upward to the required 1-10 mbar pressures, necessary to explain the cloud deck. These results further confirm the importance of clouds in hot-Jupiters, which can potentially dominate the overall spectra and may alter the abundances of key gaseous species.
  • We present an optical to near-infrared transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-1b, based on HST observations, covering the spectral regime from 0.29 to 1.027{\mu}m with STIS, which is coupled with a recent WFC3 transit (1.087 to 1.687{\mu}m). We derive refined physical parameters of the HAT-P-1 system, including an improved orbital ephemeris. The transmission spectrum shows a strong absorption signature shortward of 0.55{\mu}m, with a strong blueward slope into the near-ultraviolet. We detect atmospheric sodium absorption at a 3.3{\sigma} significance level, but find no evidence for the potassium feature. The red data implies a marginally flat spectrum with a tentative absorption enhancement at wavelength longer than ~0.85{\mu}m. The STIS and WFC3 spectra differ significantly in absolute radius level (4.3 +/- 1.6 pressure scale heights), implying strong optical absorption in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b. The optical to near-infrared difference cannot be explained by stellar activity, as simulta- neous stellar activity monitoring of the G0V HAT-P-1b host star and its identical companion show no significant activity that could explain the result. We compare the complete STIS and WFC3 transmission spectrum with theoretical atmospheric mod- els which include haze, sodium and an extra optical absorber. We find that both an optical absorber and a super-solar sodium to water abundance ratio might be a sce- nario explaining the HAT-P-1b observations. Our results suggest that strong optical absorbers may be a dominant atmospheric feature in some hot Jupiter exoplanets.
  • We present HST optical transmission spectra of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b, taken with the STIS instrument. From the transmission spectra, we are able to decisively rule out prominent absorption by TiO in the exoplanet's atmosphere. Strong pressure-broadened Na and K absorption signatures are also excluded, as are significant metal-hydride features. We compare our combined broadband spectrum to a wide variety of existing aerosol-free atmospheric models, though none are satisfactory fits. However, we do find that the full transmission spectrum can be described by models which include significant opacity from aerosols: including Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering, tholin haze, and settling dust profiles. The transmission spectrum follows an effective extinction cross section with a power-law of index alpha, with the slope of the transmission spectrum constraining the quantity alphaT = -3528+/-660 K, where T is the atmospheric temperature. Rayleigh scattering (alpha=-4) is among the best fitting models, though requires low terminator temperatures near 900 K. Sub-micron size aerosol particles can provide equally good fits to the entire transmission spectrum for a wide range of temperatures, and we explore corundum as a plausible dust aerosol. The presence of atmospheric aerosols also helps to explain the modestly bright albedo implied by Spitzer observations, as well as the near black body nature of the emission spectrum. Ti-bearing condensates on the cooler night-side is the most natural explanation for the overall lack of TiO signatures in WASP-12b, indicating the day/night cold-trap is an important effect for very hot Jupiters. These finding indicate that aerosols can play a significant atmospheric role for the entire wide range of hot-Jupiter atmospheres, potentially affecting their overall spectrum and energy balance.(abridged)
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared transmission spectroscopy of the transiting hot-Jupiter HAT-P-1b. We observed one transit with Wide Field Camera 3 using the G141 low-resolution grism to cover the wavelength range 1.087- 1.678 {\mu}m. These time series observations were taken with the newly available spatial scan mode that increases the duty cycle by nearly a factor of two, thus improving the resulting photometric precision of the data. We measure a planet-to-star radius ratio of Rp/R*=0.11709+/-0.00038 in the white light curve with the centre of transit occurring at 2456114.345+/-0.000133 (JD). We achieve S/N levels per exposure of 1840 (0.061%) at a resolution of {\Delta\lambda}=19.2nm (R~70) in the 1.1173 - 1.6549{\mu}m spectral region, providing the precision necessary to probe the transmission spectrum of the planet at close to the resolution limit of the instrument. We compute the transmission spectrum using both single target and differential photometry with similar results. The resultant transmission spectrum shows a significant absorption above the 5-{\sigma} level matching the 1.4{\mu}m water absorption band. In solar composition models, the water absorption is sensitive to the ~1 mbar pressure levels at the terminator. The detected absorption agrees with that predicted by an 1000 K isothermal model, as well as with that predicted by a planetary-averaged temperature model.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-ultraviolet transmission spectra of the transiting hot-Jupiter HD189733b, taken with the repaired Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument. The resulting spectra cover the range 2900-5700 Ang and reach per-exposure signal-to-noise levels greater than 11,000 within a 500 Ang bandwidth. We used time series spectra obtained during two transit events to determine the wavelength dependance of the planetary radius and measure the exoplanet's atmospheric transmission spectrum for the first time over this wavelength range. Our measurements, in conjunction with existing HST spectra, now provide a broadband transmission spectrum covering the full optical regime. The STIS data also shows unambiguous evidence of a large occulted stellar spot during one of our transit events, which we use to place constraints on the characteristics of the K dwarf's stellar spots, estimating spot temperatures around Teff~4250 K. With contemporaneous ground-based photometric monitoring of the stellar variability, we also measure the correlation between the stellar activity level and transit-measured planet-to-star radius contrast, which is in good agreement with predictions. We find a planetary transmission spectrum in good agreement with that of Rayleigh scattering from a high-altitude atmospheric haze as previously found from HST ACS camera. The high-altitude haze is now found to cover the entire optical regime and is well characterised by Rayleigh scattering. These findings suggest that haze may be a globally dominant atmospheric feature of the planet which would result in a high optical albedo at shorter optical wavelengths.
  • We report on two XMM-Newton observations of the planetary host star HD189733. The system has a close in planet and it can potentially affect the coronal structure via interactions with the magnetosphere. We have obtained X-ray spectra and light curves from EPIC and RGS on board XMM-Newton which we have analyzed and interpreted. We reduced X-ray data from primary transit and secondary eclipse occurred in April 17th 2007 and May 18th 2009, respectively. In the April 2007 observation only variability due to weak flares is recognized. In 2009 HD189733 exhibited a X-ray flux always larger than in the 2007 observation. The average flux in 2009 was higher than in 2007 observation by a factor of 45%. During the 2009 secondary eclipse we observed a softening of the X-ray spectrum significant at level of ~3 sigma. Further, we observed the most intense flare recorded at either epochs. This flare occurred 3 ks after the end of the eclipse.The flare decay shows several minor ignitions perhaps linked to the main event and hinting for secondary loops that emit triggered by the main loop. Magneto-Hydro-Dynamical (MHD) simulations show that the magnetic interaction between planet and star enhances the density and the magnetic field in a region comprised between the planet and the star because of their relative orbital/rotation motion. X-ray observations and model predictions are globally found in agreement, despite the quite simple MHD model and the lack of precise estimate of parameters including the alignment and the intensity of stellar and planetary magnetic fields. Future observations should confirm or disprove this hypothesis, by determining whether flares are systematically recurring in the light curve at the same planetary phase.
  • The nearby transiting system GJ 436b offers a unique opportunity to probe the structure and atmosphere of an extra-solar "hot Neptune". In this Letter, we present the main results of observations covering two transit events with the NICMOS camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. The data consist in high-cadence time series of grism spectra covering the 1.1-1.9 micron spectral range. We find Rpl=4.04 +- 0.10 R_earth and Rstar= 0.446 +- 0.011 Rsun for the planet and star radius, confirming and improving earlier measurements with ground-based photometry and a Spitzer lightcurve at 8 microns, as opposed to a much higher value obtained with the Fine Guidance Sensor on the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure no departure from strict periodicity in the transits to the level of ~7 seconds. This strongly disfavours the proposed explanation of the orbital eccentricity of GJ 436b in terms of the perturbation by another close-by planet. We measure a flat transmission spectrum at the level of a few parts per 10 000 in flux, with no significant signal in the 1.4-micron water band to a level comparable to the maximum amplitude of the effect predicted by planetary atmosphere models.
  • The nearby transiting planet HD 189733b was observed during three transits with the ACS camera of the Hubble Space Telescope in spectroscopic mode. The resulting time series of 675 spectra covers the 550-1050 nm range, with a resolution element of ~8 nm, at extremely high accuracy (signal-to-noise ratio up to 10,000 in 50 nm intervals in each individual spectrum). Using these data, we disentangle the effects of limb darkening, measurement systematics, and spots on the surface of the host star, to calculate the wavelength dependence of the effective transit radius to an accuracy of ~50 km. This constitutes the ``transmission spectrum'' of the planetary atmosphere. It indicates at each wavelength at what height the planetary atmosphere becomes opaque to the grazing stellar light during the transit. In this wavelength range, strong features due to sodium, potassium and water are predicted by atmosphere models for a planet like HD 189733b, but they can be hidden by broad absorption from clouds or hazes higher up in the atmosphere. We observed an almost featureless transmission spectrum between 550 and 1050 nm, with no indication of the expected sodium or potassium atomic absorption features. Comparison of our results with the transit radius observed in the near and mid-infrared (2-8 microns), and the slope of the spectrum, suggest the presence of a haze of sub-micron particles in the upper atmosphere of the planet.