• The influence of a supersonic projectile on a three-dimensional complex plasma is studied. Micron sized particles in a low-temperature plasma formed a large undisturbed system in the new 'Zyflex' chamber during microgravity conditions. A supersonic probe particle excited a Mach cone with Mach number M $\approx$ 1.5 - 2 and double Mach cone structure in the large weakly damped particle cloud. The speed of sound is measured with different methods and particle charge estimations are compared to calculations from standard theories. The high image resolution enables the study of Mach cones in microgravity on the single particle level of a three-dimensional complex plasma and gives insight to the dynamics. A heating of the microparticles is discovered behind the supersonic projectile but not in the flanks of the Mach cone.
  • We report an experimental observation of coupling of the transverse vertical and longitudinal in-plane dust-lattice wave modes in a two-dimensional complex plasma crystal in the absence of mode crossing. A new large diameter rf plasma chamber was used to suspend the plasma crystal. The observations are confirmed with molecular-dynamics simulations. The coupling manifests itself in traces of the transverse vertical mode appearing in the measured longitudinal spectra and vice versa. We calculate the expected ratio of the trace to the principal mode with a theoretical analysis of the modes in a crystal with finite temperature and find good agreement with the experiment and simulations.
  • In this paper we discuss the relations between the exact shape of interparticle interactions in complex (dusty) plasmas and the dispersion relation of the longitudinal collective mode. Several representative repulsive potentials, predicted previously theoretically, are chosen and the corresponding dispersion relations are calculated using the quasi-crystalline approximation. Both weakly coupled and strongly coupled regimes are considered. It is shown that the long-wavelength portions of the dispersion relations are sensitive to the long-range asymptote of the interaction potential. This can be used to discriminate between different interaction mechanisms operational in complex plasmas experimentally. Main requirements are briefly discussed.
  • An interaction of upstream extra particles with a monolayer highly-ordered complex plasma is studied. A principally new abnormal turbulent wake formed behind the supersonic upstream particle is discovered. An anomalous type of the turbulence wake clearly manifests in anomalously low thermal diffusivity and two orders of magnitude larger particle kinetic temperature compared to that of the 'normal' wake (Mach cone) observed by Du et al [Europhys. Lett. 99, 55001 (2012)].
  • An interferometric imaging technique has been proposed to instantly measure the diameter of individual spherical dust particles suspended in a gas discharge plasma. The technique is based on the defocused image analysis of both spherical particles and their binary agglomerates. Above a critical diameter, the defocused images of spherical particles contain stationary interference fringe patterns and the fringe number increases with particle diameters. Below this critical diameter, the particle size has been measured using the rotational interference fringe patterns which appear only on the defocused images of binary agglomerates. In this case, a lower cut-off limit of particle diameter has been predicted, below which no such rotational fringe patterns are observed for the binary agglomerates. The method can be useful as a diagnostics for complex plasma experiments on earth as well as under microgravity condition.
  • A new type of quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma system was observed which consisted of monodisperse microspheres and their binary agglomerations (dimers). The particles and their dimers levitated in a plasma sheath at slightly different heights and formed two distinct sublayers. The sys- tem did not crystallize and may be characterized as disordered solid. The dimers were identified based on their characteristic appearance in defocused images, i.e., rotating interference fringe pat- terns. The in-plane and inter-plane particle separations exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the discharge pressure which agrees well with theoretical predictions.
  • The collective motion of dust particles during the mode-coupling induced melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal is explored in molecular dynamics simulations. The crystal is compressed horizontally by an anisotropic confinement. This compression leads to an asymmetric triggering of the mode-coupling instability which is accompanied by alternating chains of in-phase and anti-phase oscillating particles. A new order parameter is proposed to quantify the synchronization with respect to different directions of the crystal. Depending on the orientation of the confinement anisotropy, mode-coupling instability and synchronized motion are observed in one or two directions. Notably, the synchronization is found to be direction-dependent. The good agreement with experiments suggests that the confinement anisotropy can be used to explain the observed synchronization process.
  • Application of the ion sphere model (ISM), well known in the context of the one-component-plasma, to estimate thermodynamic properties of model Yukawa systems is discussed. It is shown that the ISM approximation provides fairly good estimate of the internal energy of the strongly coupled Yukawa systems, in both fluid and solid phases. Simple expressions for the excess pressure and isothermal compressibility are derived, which can be particularly useful in connection to wave phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas. It is also shown that in the regime of strong screening a simple consideration of neighboring particles interactions can be sufficient to obtain quite accurate estimates of thermodynamic properties of Yukawa systems.
  • The observation is presented of naturally occurring pairing of particles and their cooperative drift in a two-dimensional plasma crystal. A single layer of plastic microspheres was suspended in the plasma sheath of a capacitively coupled rf discharge in argon at a low pressure of 1 Pa. The particle dynamics were studied by combining the top-view and side-view imaging of the suspension. Cross analysis of the particle trajectories allowed us to identify naturally occurring metastable pairs of particles. The lifetime of pairs was long enough for their reliable identification.
  • Experiments to explore stability conditions and topology of a dense microparticle cloud supported against gravity by a gas flow were carried out. By using a nozzle shaped glass insert within the glass tube of a dc discharge plasma chamber a weakly ionized gas flow through a de Laval nozzle was produced. The experiments were performed using neon gas at a pressure of 100 Pa and melamine-formaldehyde particles with a diameter of 3.43 {\mu}m. The capturing and stable global confining of the particles behind the nozzle in the plasma were demonstrated. The particles inside the cloud behaved as a single convection cell inhomogeneously structured along the nozzle axis in a tube-like manner. The pulsed acceleration localized in the very head of the cloud mediated by collective plasma-particle interactions and the resulting wave pattern were studied in detail.
  • The structure of driven three-dimensional complex plasma clusters was studied experimentally. The clusters consisted of around 60 hollow glass spheres with a diameter of 22 microns that were suspended in a plasma of rf discharge in argon. The particles were confined in a glass box with conductive yet transparent coating on its four side walls, this allowed to manipulate the particle cluster by biasing the confining walls in a certain sequence. In this work, a rotating electric field was used to drive the clusters. Depending on the excitation frequency, the clusters rotated (10^4 - 10^7 times slower than the rotating field) or remained stationary. The cluster structure was neither that of nested spherical shells nor simple chain structure. Strings of various lengths were found consisting of 2 to 5 particles, their spatial and temporal correlations were studied. The results are compared to recent simulations.
  • Structure of Mach cones in a crystalline complex plasma has been studied experimentally using an intensity sensitive imaging, which resolved particle motion in three dimensions. This revealed a previously unknown out-of-plane cone structure, which appeared due to excitation of the vertical wave mode. The complex plasma consisted of micron sized particles forming a monolayer in a plasma sheath of a gas discharge. Fast particles, spontaneously moving under the monolayer, created Mach cones with multiple structures. The in-plane cone structure was due to compressional and shear lattice waves.
  • Two-dimensional plasma crystals are characterized by a strong up-and-down asymmetry not only due to gravity but also due to the presence of plasma flow at the location of particles. We study for the first time the interaction of a single-layer plasma crystal with charged extra particles located above it (upstream of the flow of ions). Upstream extra particles tend to move between the rows of particles in the crystal, accelerate to supersonic speeds, and excite attraction-dominated Mach cones and wakes in the crystal.
  • A defocusing imaging technique has been used as a diagnostic to identify binary agglomerates (dimers) in complex plasmas. Quasi-two-dimensional plasma crystal consisting of monodisperse spheres and binary agglomerates has been created where the agglomerated particles levitate just below the spherical particles without forming vertical pairs. Unlike spherical particles, the defocused images of binary agglomerates show distinct, stationary/periodically rotating interference fringe patterns. The results can be of fundamental importance for future experiments on complex plasmas.
  • Phase behavior of large three-dimensional complex plasma systems under microgravity conditions onboard the International Space Station is investigated. The neutral gas pressure is used as a control parameter to trigger phase changes. Detailed analysis of structural properties and evaluation of three different melting/freezing indicators reveal that complex plasmas can exhibit melting by increasing the gas pressure. Theoretical estimates of complex plasma parameters allow us to identify main factors responsible for the observed behavior. The location of phase states of the investigated systems on a relevant equilibrium phase diagram is estimated. Important differences between the melting process of 3D complex plasmas under microgravity conditions and that of flat 2D complex plasma crystals in ground based experiments are discussed.
  • Experiments with two-dimensional (2D) plasma crystals are usually carried out in rf plasma sheaths, where the interparticle interactions are modified due to the presence of plasma wakes. The wake-mediated interactions result in the coupling between wave modes in 2D crystals, which can trigger the mode-coupling instability and cause melting. The theory predicts a number of distinct fingerprints to be observed upon the instability onset, such as the emergence of a new hybrid mode, a critical angular dependence, a mixed polarization, and distinct thresholds. In this paper we summarize these key features and provide their detailed discussion, analyze the critical dependence on experimental parameters, and highlight the outstanding issues.
  • Freezing and melting of large three-dimensional complex plasmas under microgravity conditions is investigated. The neutral gas pressure is used as a control parameter to trigger the phase changes: Complex plasma freezes (melts) by decreasing (increasing) the pressure. Evolution of complex plasma structural properties upon pressure variation is studied. Theoretical estimates allow us to identify main factors responsible for the observed behavior.
  • Dedicated experiments on melting of 2D plasma crystals were carried out. The melting was always accompanied by spontaneous growth of the particle kinetic energy, suggesting a universal plasma-driven mechanism underlying the process. By measuring three principal dust-lattice (DL) wave modes simultaneously, it is unambiguously demonstrated that the melting occurs due to the resonance coupling between two of the DL modes. The variation of the wave modes with the experimental conditions, including the emergence of the resonant (hybrid) branch, reveals exceptionally good agreement with the theory of mode-coupling instability.
  • Spectra of phonons with out-of-plane polarization were studied experimentally in a 2D plasma crystal. The dispersion relation was directly measured for the first time using a novel method of particle imaging. The out-of-plane mode was proven to have negative optical dispersion, comparison with theory showed good agreement. The effect of the plasma wakes on the dispersion relation is briefly discussed.
  • The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane formation process is in good agreement with computer simulations of a binary Yukawa model with Langevin dynamics. The laning is quantified in terms of the anisotropic scaling index, leading to a universal order parameter for driven systems.