• Since its discovery in 2008, the Andromeda galaxy nova M31N 2008-12a has been observed in eruption every single year. This unprecedented frequency indicates an extreme object, with a massive white dwarf and a high accretion rate, which is the most promising candidate for the single-degenerate progenitor of a type-Ia supernova known to date. The previous three eruptions of M31N 2008-12a have displayed remarkably homogeneous multi-wavelength properties: (i) From a faint peak, the optical light curve declined rapidly by two magnitudes in less than two days; (ii) Early spectra showed initial high velocities that slowed down significantly within days and displayed clear He/N lines throughout; (iii) The supersoft X-ray source (SSS) phase of the nova began extremely early, six days after eruption, and only lasted for about two weeks. In contrast, the peculiar 2016 eruption was clearly different. Here we report (i) the considerable delay in the 2016 eruption date, (ii) the significantly shorter SSS phase, and (iii) the brighter optical peak magnitude (with a hitherto unobserved cusp shape). Early theoretical models suggest that these three different effects can be consistently understood as caused by a lower quiescence mass-accretion rate. The corresponding higher ignition mass caused a brighter peak in the free-free emission model. The less-massive accretion disk experienced greater disruption, consequently delaying re-establishment of effective accretion. Without the early refueling, the SSS phase was shortened. Observing the next few eruptions will determine whether the properties of the 2016 outburst make it a genuine outlier in the evolution of M31N 2008-12a.
  • The search of life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and a major priority for NASA. A key area of major progress since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 (NAS15) has been a shift from the exoplanet discovery phase to a phase of characterization and modeling of the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres, and the development of observational strategies for the search for life in the Universe by combining expertise from four NASA science disciplines including heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science and Earth science. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanetary System Science (NExSS) has provided an efficient environment for such interdisciplinary studies. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles produce disturbances in interplanetary space collectively referred to as space weather, which interacts with the Earth upper atmosphere and causes dramatic impact on space and ground-based technological systems. Exoplanets within close in habitable zones around M dwarfs and other active stars are exposed to extreme ionizing radiation fluxes, thus making exoplanetary space weather (ESW) effects a crucial factor of habitability. In this paper, we describe the recent developments and provide recommendations in this interdisciplinary effort with the focus on the impacts of ESW on habitability, and the prospects for future progress in searching for signs of life in the Universe as the outcome of the NExSS workshop held in Nov 29 - Dec 2, 2016, New Orleans, LA. This is one of five Life Beyond the Solar System white papers submitted by NExSS to the National Academy of Sciences in support of the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
  • We present the results of our analysis of KIC 4150611 (HD 181469) - an interesting, bright quintuple system that includes a hybrid $\delta$ Sct/$\gamma$ Dor pulsator. Four periods of eclipses - 94.2, 8.65, 1.52 and 1.43 d - have been observed by the Kepler satellite, and three point sources (A, B, and C) are seen in high angular resolution images. From spectroscopic observations made with the HIDES spectrograph attached to the 1.88-m telescope of the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO), for the first time we calculated radial velocities (RVs) of the component B - a pair of G-type stars - and combined them with Kepler photometry in order to obtain absolute physical parameters of this pair. We also managed to directly measure RVs of the pulsator, also for the first time. Additionally, we modelled the light curves of the 1.52 and 1.43-day pairs, and measured their eclipse timing variations (ETVs). We also performed relative astrometry and photometry of three sources seen on the images taken with the NIRC2 camera of the Keck II telescope. Finally, we compared our results with theoretical isochrones. The brightest component Aa is the hybrid pulsator, transited every 94.2 days by a pair of K/M-type stars (Ab1+Ab2), which themselves form a 1.52-day eclipsing binary. The components Ba and Bb are late G-type stars, forming another eclipsing pair with a 8.65 day period. Their masses and radii are $M_{Ba}=0.894\pm0.010$ M$_\odot$, $R_{Ba}=0.802\pm0.044$ R$_\odot$ for the primary, and $M_{Bb}=0.888\pm0.010$ M$_\odot$, $R_{Bb}=0.856\pm0.038$ R$_\odot$ for the secondary. The remaining period of 1.43 days is possibly related to a faint third star C, which itself is most likely a background object. The system's properties are well-represented by a 35 Myr isochrone. There are also hints of additional bodies in the system.
  • We present the results of our spectroscopic observations of eight detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the $Kepler$ Eclipsing Binary Catalog. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from high resolution spectra obtained with the HIDES pectrograph, attached to the 1.88-m telescope of the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and were used to characterize the targets in combination with the $Kepler$ light curves. For each binary we obtained a full set of orbital and physical parameters, reaching precision below 3% in masses and radii for 5 pairs. By comparing our results with theoretical models, we assess the distance, age and evolutionary status of the researched objects. We also study eclipse timing variations of selected objects, and identify a new system with a $\gamma$Dor pulsator. Two systems are triples, and show lines coming from three components. In one case the motion of the outer star and the perturbation in the RVs of the inner binary are clearly visible and periodical, which allows us to directly calculate the mass of the third star, and inclination of the outer orbit. In the second case we only see a clear motion of the tertiary, and investigate two scenarios: that it is a linear trend coming from the orbital motion around the inner binary, and that it is caused by a planetary mass companion. When possible, we also compare our results with the literature, and conclude that only by combining photometry with RVs it is possible to obtain correct physical parameters of both components of a DEB.
  • We present results of our spectroscopic observations of nine detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the $Kepler$ Eclipsing Binary Catalog, that only show one set of spectral lines. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from the high resolution spectra obtained with the HIDES instrument, attached to the 1.88-m telescope at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and from the public APOGEE archive. In our sample we found five single-lined binaries, with one component dominating the spectrum. The orbital and light curve solutions were found for four of them, and compared with isochrones, in order to estimate absolute physical parameters and evolutionary status of the components. For the fifth case we only update the orbital parameters, and estimate the properties of the unseen star. Two other systems show orbital motion with a period known from the eclipse timing variations (ETVs). For these we obtained parameters of outer orbits, by translating the ETVs to RVs of the centre of mass of the eclipsing binary, and combining with the RVs of the outer star. Of the two remaining ones, one is most likely a blend of a faint background DEB with a bright foreground star, which lines we see in the spectra, and the last case is possibly a quadruple bearing a sub-stellar mass object. Where possible, we compare our results with literature, especially with results from asteroseismology. We also report possible detections of solar-like oscillations in our RVs.
  • The Andromeda Galaxy recurrent nova M31N 2008-12a had been observed in eruption ten times, including yearly eruptions from 2008-2014. With a measured recurrence period of $P_\mathrm{rec}=351\pm13$ days (we believe the true value to be half of this) and a white dwarf very close to the Chandrasekhar limit, M31N 2008-12a has become the leading pre-explosion supernova type Ia progenitor candidate. Following multi-wavelength follow-up observations of the 2013 and 2014 eruptions, we initiated a campaign to ensure early detection of the predicted 2015 eruption, which triggered ambitious ground and space-based follow-up programs. In this paper we present the 2015 detection; visible to near-infrared photometry and visible spectroscopy; and ultraviolet and X-ray observations from the Swift observatory. The LCOGT 2m (Hawaii) discovered the 2015 eruption, estimated to have commenced at Aug. $28.28\pm0.12$ UT. The 2013-2015 eruptions are remarkably similar at all wavelengths. New early spectroscopic observations reveal short-lived emission from material with velocities $\sim13000$ km s$^{-1}$, possibly collimated outflows. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eruption provide strong evidence supporting a red giant donor. An apparently stochastic variability during the early super-soft X-ray phase was comparable in amplitude and duration to past eruptions, but the 2013 and 2015 eruptions show evidence of a brief flux dip during this phase. The multi-eruption Swift/XRT spectra show tentative evidence of high-ionization emission lines above a high-temperature continuum. Following Henze et al. (2015a), the updated recurrence period based on all known eruptions is $P_\mathrm{rec}=174\pm10$ d, and we expect the next eruption of M31N 2008-12a to occur around mid-Sep. 2016.
  • The Andromeda Galaxy recurrent nova M31N 2008-12a had been caught in eruption eight times. The inter-eruption period of M31N 2008-12a is ~1 year, making it the most rapidly recurring system known, and a strong single-degenerate Type Ia Supernova progenitor candidate. Following the 2013 eruption, a campaign was initiated to detect the predicted 2014 eruption and to then perform high cadence optical photometric and spectroscopic monitoring using ground-based telescopes, along with rapid UV and X-ray follow-up with the Swift satellite. Here we report the results of a high cadence multicolour optical monitoring campaign, the spectroscopic evolution, and the UV photometry. We also discuss tantalising evidence of a potentially related, vastly-extended, nebulosity. The 2014 eruption was discovered, before optical maximum, on October 2, 2014. We find that the optical properties of M31N 2008-12a evolve faster than all Galactic recurrent novae known, and all its eruptions show remarkable similarity both photometrically and spectroscopically. Optical spectra were obtained as early as 0.26 days post maximum, and again confirm the nova nature of the eruption. A significant deceleration of the inferred ejecta expansion velocity is observed which may be caused by interaction of the ejecta with surrounding material, possibly a red giant wind. We find a low ejected mass and low ejection velocity, which are consistent with high mass-accretion rate, high mass white dwarf, and short recurrence time models of novae. We encourage additional observations, especially around the predicted time of the next eruption, towards the end of 2015.
  • We propose a new method to reconstruct the structure of accretion disks in dwarf novae using multi-band light curves of early superhumps. Our model assumes that early superhumps are caused by the rotation effect of non-axisymmetrically flaring disks. We have developed a Bayesian model for this reconstruction, in which a smoother disk-structure tends to have a higher prior probability. We analyzed simultaneous optical and near-infrared photometric data of early superhumps of the dwarf nova, V455 And using this technique. The reconstructed disk has two flaring parts in the outermost region of the disk. These parts are responsible for the primary and secondary maxima of the light curves. The height-to-radius ratio is h/r=0.20-0.25 in the outermost region. In addition to the outermost flaring structures, flaring arm-like patterns can be seen in an inner region of the reconstructed disk. The overall profile of the reconstructed disk is reminiscent of the disk structure that is deformed by the tidal effect. However, an inner arm-like pattern, which is responsible for the secondary minimum in the light curve, cannot be reproduced only by the tidal effect. It implies the presence of another mechanism that deforms the disk structure. Alternatively, the temperature distribution of the disk could be non-axisymmetric. We demonstrate that the disk structure with weaker arm-like patterns is optimal in the model including the irradiation effect. However, the strongly irradiated disk gives quite blue colors, which may conflict with the observation. Our results suggest that the amplitude of early superhumps depends mainly on the height of the outermost flaring regions of the disk. We predict that early superhumps can be detected with an amplitude of >0.02 mag in about 90% of WZ Sge stars.
  • We present a detailed study of the spin-torque diode effect in CoFeB/MgO/CoFe/NiFe magnetic tunnel junctions. From the evolution of the resonance frequency with magnetic field at different angles, we clearly identify the free-layer mode and find an excellent agreement with simulations by taking into account several terms for magnetic anisotropy. Moreover, we demonstrate the large contribution of the out-of-plane torque in our junctions with asymmetric electrodes compared to the in-plane torque. Consequently, we provide a way to enhance the sensitivity of these devices for the detection of microwave frequency.
  • Shifting electrically a magnetic domain wall (DW) by the spin transfer mechanism is one of the future ways foreseen for the switching of spintronic memories or registers. The classical geometries where the current is injected in the plane of the magnetic layers suffer from a poor efficiency of the intrinsic torques acting on the DWs. A way to circumvent this problem is to use vertical current injection. In that case, theoretical calculations attribute the microscopic origin of DW displacements to the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque. Here we report experiments in which we controllably displace a DW in the planar electrode of a magnetic tunnel junction by vertical current injection. Our measurements confirm the major role of the out-of-plane spin torque for DW motion, and allow to quantify this term precisely. The involved current densities are about 100 times smaller than the one commonly observed with in-plane currents. Step by step resistance switching of the magnetic tunnel junction opens a new way for the realization of spintronic memristive devices.
  • We present the results of photometric observations of SDSS J080434.20+510349.2 in its low state and during an outburst and spectroscopy during the outburst. We found such peculiarities as a long-term outburst with amplitude probably not less than 6m, rarity of the outbursts, eleven rebrightenings, and a short (0.059713(7) d) superhump period. We conclude that this star belongs to the WZ Sge-type subclass of cataclysmic variables. The spectrum shows both emission and absorption lines of H and He superimposed on the blue continuum. We also found 8 -- 9 min. brightness variations during the end of the super-outburst plateau that could be related to pulsations of the white dwarf in the binary.
  • Several SU UMa-type dwarf novae, in particular, WZ Sge-type stars tend to exhibit rebrightenings after superoutbursts. The rebrightening phenomenon is problematic for the disk instability theory of dwarf novae since it requires a large amount of remnant matter in the disk even after superoutbursts. Here, we report our optical and infrared observations during the first-ever outburst of a new dwarf nova, SDSS J102146.44+234926.3. During the outburst, we detected superhumps with a period of 0.056281 +/- 0.000015 d, which is typical for superhump periods in WZ Sge stars. In conjunction with the appearance of a long-lived rebrightening, we conclude that the object is a new member of WZ Sge stars. Our observations, furthermore, revealed infrared behaviors for the first time in the rebrightening phase of WZ Sge stars. We discovered prominent infrared superhumps. We calculate the color temperature of the infrared superhump source to be 4600-6400 K. These temperatures are too low to be explained with a fully-ionized disk appearing during dwarf nova outbursts. We also found a Ks-band excess over the hot disk component. These unprecedented infrared activities provide evidence for the presence of mass reservoir at the outermost part of the accretion disk. We propose that a moderately high mass-accretion rate at this infrared active region leads to the long-lived rebrightening observed in SDSS J102146.44+234926.3.
  • By using the high-dispersion spectra of 14 bright planet-harboring stars (along with 4 reference stars) observed with the new coude echelle spectrograph at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, we investigated the abundances of volatile elements (C, N, O, S, Zn; low condensation temperature Tc) in order to examine whether these show any significant difference compared to the abundances of other refractory elements (Si, Ti, V, Fe, Co, Ni; high Tc) which are known to be generally overabundant in those stars with planets, since a Tc-dependence is expected if the cause of such a metal-richness is due to the accretion of solid planetesimals onto the host star. We found, however, that all elements we studied behave themselves quite similarly to Fe (i.e., [X/Fe]~0) even for the case of volatile elements, which may suggest that the enhanced metallicity in those planet-bearing stars is not so much an acquired character (by accretion of rocky material) as rather primordial.
  • We discovered a new deeply eclipsing SU UMa-type dwarf nova, IY UMa, which experienced a superoutburst in 2000 January. Our monitoring revealed two distinct outbursts, which suggest a superoutburst interval of ~800 d, or its half, and an outburst amplitude of 5.4 mag. From time-series photometry during the superoutburst, we determined a superhump and orbital period of 0.07588 d and 0.0739132 d, respectively.