• The direct detection of dark matter particles requires ultra-low background conditions at energies below a few tens of keV; cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in detectors and other materials is one of the background sources which has to be under control. In particular, tritium is specially relevant for its decay properties (very low endpoint energy and long half-life) when induced in the detector medium, and because it can be generated in any material as an spallation product. Quantification of cosmogenic production of tritium is not easy. A method for the calculation of production rates at sea level has been developed and applied to some of the materials typically used as targets in dark matter detectors (germanium, sodium iodide, argon and neon); it is based on a selection of excitation functions over the entire energy range of cosmic nucleons. Results have been compared with available data in the literature, either from other calculations or from measurements. The obtained tritium production rates, ranging from a few tens to a few hundreds of nuclei per kg and per day at sea level, point to a significant contribution to the background in dark matter experiments, requiring the application of specific protocols for target material purification, material storing underground and limiting the time the detector is on surface during the building process in order to minimize the exposure to the most dangerous cosmic rays component.
  • The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a compelling but technologically challenging strategy to provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Most directional detectors aim to reconstruct the dark-matter-induced nuclear recoil tracks, either in gas or solid targets. The main challenge with directional detection is the need for high spatial resolution over large volumes, which puts strong requirements on the readout technologies. In this paper we review the various detector readout technologies used by directional detectors. In particular, we summarize the challenges, advantages and drawbacks of each approach, and discuss future prospects for these technologies.
  • In the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe, a high pressure xenon time projection chamber (HPXe-TPC) has two advantages over liquid xenon TPCs: a better energy resolution and the access to topological features, which may provide extra discrimination from background events. The PandaX-III experiment has recently proposed a 200 kg HPXe-TPC based on Micromegas readout planes, to be located at the Jinping Underground Laboratory in China. Its detection concept is based on two results obtained within the T-REX project: Micromegas readouts can be built with extremely low levels of radioactivity; and the operation in xenon-trimethylamine at 10 bar in realistic experimental conditions has proven an energy resolution of 3% FWHM at the region of interest. In this work, two discrimination methods are applied to simulated signal and background data in a generic 200 kg HPXe-TPC, based on two well-known algorithms of graph theory: the identification of connections and the search for the longest path. Rejection factors greater than 100 are obtained for small pixel sizes and a signal efficiency of 40%. Moreover, a new observable (the blob charge density) rejects better surface contaminations, which makes the use of a trigger signal ($T_0$) not imperative in this experiment.
  • The most compelling candidates for Dark Matter to day are WIMPs and axions. The applicability of gasesous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) to the search of these particles is explored within this work. Both particles would produce an extremely low rate at very low energies in particle detectors. Micromegas detectors can provide both low background rates and low en- ergy threshold, due to the high granularity, radiopurity and uniformity of the readout. Small (few cm wide) Micromegas detectors are used to image the axion-induced x-ray signal expected in the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment. We show the background levels obtained in CAST and the prospects to further reduce them to the values required by the Internation Axion Observatory (IAXO). We also present TREX-DM, a scaled-up version of the Micromegas used in axion research, but this time dedicated to the low-mass WIMP detection. TREX-DM is a high-pressure Micromegas-based TPC designed to host a few hundreds of grams of light nuclei (argon or neon) with energy thresholds potentially at the level of 100 eV. The detector is described in detail, as well as the results of the commissioning and characterization phase on surface. Besides, the back- ground model of TREX-DM is presented, along with the anticipated sensitivity of this search, which could go beyond current experimental limits.
  • As part of the T-REX project, a number of R&D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of Micromegas-read gaseous TPCs in rare event searches like double beta decay (DBD), axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. While in the companion paper we focus on DBD, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the search for dark matter candidates, both axions and WIMPs. Small ultra-low background Micromegas detectors are used to image the x-ray signal expected in axion helioscopes like CAST at CERN. Background levels as low as $0.8\times 10^{-6}$ c keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ have already been achieved in CAST while values down to $\sim10^{-7}$ c keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ have been obtained in a test bench placed underground in the Laboratorio Subterr\'aneo de Canfranc. Prospects to consolidate and further reduce these values down to $\sim10^{-8}$ c keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$will be described. Such detectors, placed at the focal point of x-ray telescopes in the future IAXO experiment, would allow for 10$^5$ better signal-to-noise ratio than CAST, and search for solar axions with $g_{a\gamma}$ down to few 10$^{12}$ GeV$^{-1}$, well into unexplored axion parameter space. In addition, a scaled-up version of these TPCs, properly shielded and placed underground, can be competitive in the search for low-mass WIMPs. The TREX-DM prototype, with $\sim$0.300 kg of Ar at 10 bar, or alternatively $\sim$0.160 kg of Ne at 10 bar, and energy threshold well below 1 keV, has been built to test this concept. We will describe the main technical solutions developed, as well as the results from the commissioning phase on surface. The anticipated sensitivity of this technique might reach $\sim10^{-44}$ cm$^2$ for low mass ($<10$ GeV) WIMPs, well beyond current experimental limits in this mass range.
  • As part of the T-REX project, a number of R&D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of gaseous Micromegas-read TPCs in rare event searches like double beta decay (DBD), axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. In both this and its companion paper, we compile the main results of the project and give an outlook of application prospects for this detection technique. While in the companion paper we focus on axions and WIMPs, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the measurement of the DBD of $^{136}$Xe in a high pressure Xe (HPXe) TPC. Particularly relevant are the results obtained in Xe + TMA mixtures with microbulk Micromegas, showing very promising results in terms of gain, stability of operation, and energy resolution at pressures up to 10 bar. TMA at levels of $\sim$1\% reduces electron diffusion by a factor of 10 with respect to pure Xe, improving the quality of the topological pattern, with a positive impact on the discrimination capability. Operation with a medium size prototype (30 cm diameter and 38 cm drift) of 1 kg of Xe at 10 bar in the fiducial volumen has allowed to test the detection concept in realistic experimental conditions. Microbulk Micromegas are able to image the DBD ionization signature with high quality while, at the same time, measuring its energy deposition with a resolution of at least $\sim$3% FWHM @ Q$_{\beta\beta}$, and probably down to $\sim$1% FWHM. In addition, first results on the topological signature information show promising background discrimination capabilities out of reach of other experimental implementations. Moreover, microbulk Micromegas have very low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, and offer cost-effective scaling-up options. All these results demonstrate that Micromegas-read HPXe TPC is a very competitive technique for the next generation DBD experiments.
  • We report on the design, construction and operation of a low background x-ray detection line composed of a shielded Micromegas (micromesh gaseous structure) detector of the microbulk technique. The detector is made from radiopure materials and is placed at the focal point of a $\sim$~5 cm diameter, 1.3 m focal-length, cone-approximation Wolter I x-ray telescope (XRT) comprised of thermally-formed (or "slumped") glass substrates deposited with multilayer coatings. The system has been conceived as a technological pathfinder for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO), as it combines two of the techniques (optic and detector) proposed in the conceptual design of the project. It is innovative for two reasons: it is the first time an x-ray optic has been designed and fabricated specifically for axion research, and the first time a Micromegas detector has been operated with an x-ray optic. The line has been installed at one end of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) magnet and is currently looking for solar axions. The combination of the XRT and Micromegas detector provides the best signal-to-noise ratio obtained so far by any detection system of the CAST experiment with a background rate of 5.4$\times$10$^{-3}\;$counts per hour in the energy region-of-interest and signal spot area.
  • We model the response of a state of the art micro-hole single-stage charge amplication device (`microbulk' Micromegas) in a gaseous atmosphere consisting of Xenon/trimethylamine at various concentrations and pressures. The amplifying structure, made with photo-lithographic techniques similar to those followed in the fabrication of gas electron multipliers (GEMs), consisted of a 100 um-side equilateral-triangle pattern with 50 um-diameter holes placed at its vertexes. Once the primary electrons are guided into the holes by virtue of an optimized field configuration, avalanches develop along the 50 um-height channels etched out of the original doubly copper-clad polyimide foil. In order to properly account for the strong field gradients at the holes' entrance as well as for the fluctuations of the avalanche process (that ultimately determine the achievable energy resolution), we abandoned the hydrodynamic framework, resorting to a purely microscopic description of the electron trajectories as obtained from elementary cross-sections. We show that achieving a satisfactory description needs additional assumptions about atom-molecule (Penning) transfer reactions and charge recombination to be made.
  • Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.
  • Micromegas detectors are an optimum technological choice for the detection of low energy x-rays. The low background techniques applied to these detectors yielded remarkable background reductions over the years, being the CAST experiment beneficiary of these developments. In this document we report on the latest upgrades towards further background reductions and better understanding of the detectors' response. The upgrades encompass the readout electronics, a new detector design and the implementation of a more efficient cosmic muon veto system. Background levels below 10$^{-6}$keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ have been obtained at sea level for the first time, demonstrating the feasibility of the expectations posed by IAXO, the next generation axion helioscope. Some results obtained with a set of measurements conducted in the x-ray beam of the CAST Detector Laboratory will be also presented and discussed.