• We report that the sample miniaturization of first-order-phase-transition bulk systems causes a greater degree of supercooling. From a theoretical perspective, the size effects can be rationalized by considering two mechanisms: (i) the nucleation is a rare and stochastic event, and thus, its rate is correlated with the volume and/or surface area of a given sample; (ii) when the sample size decreases, the dominant heterogeneous nucleation sites that play a primary role for relatively large samples are annealed out. We experimentally verified the size effects on the supercooling phenomena for two different types of strongly correlated electron systems: the transition-metal dichalcogenide IrTe$_2$ and the organic conductor $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$RbZn(SCN)$_4$. The origin of the size effects considered in this study does not depend on microscopic details of the material; therefore, they may often be involved in the first-order-transition behavior of small-volume specimens.
  • Skyrmions, topologically-protected nanometric spin vortices, are being investigated extensively in various magnets. Among them, many of structurally-chiral cubic magnets host the triangular-lattice skyrmion crystal (SkX) as the thermodynamic equilibrium state. However, this state exists only in a narrow temperature and magnetic-field region just below the magnetic transition temperature $T_\mathrm{c}$, while a helical or conical magnetic state prevails at lower temperatures. Here we describe that for a room-temperature skyrmion material, $\beta$-Mn-type Co$_8$Zn$_8$Mn$_4$, a field-cooling via the equilibrium SkX state can suppress the transition to the helical or conical state, instead realizing robust metastable SkX states that survive over a very wide temperature and magnetic-field region, including down to zero temperature and up to the critical magnetic field of the ferromagnetic transition. Furthermore, the lattice form of the metastable SkX is found to undergo reversible transitions between a conventional triangular lattice and a novel square lattice upon varying the temperature and magnetic field. These findings exemplify the topological robustness of the once-created skyrmions, and establish metastable skyrmion phases as a fertile ground for technological applications.
  • Quantum spin liquids are exotic Mott insulators that carry extraordinary spin excitations and thus, when doped, expected to afford novel metallic states coupled to the unconventional magnetic excitations. The organic triangular-lattice system k-(ET)4Hg2.89Br8 is a promising candidate for the doped spin-liquid and hosts a non-Fermi liquid at low pressures. We show that, in the non-Fermi liquid regime, the charge transport confined in the layer gets deconfined sharply at low temperatures, coinciding with the entrance of spins into a quantum regime as signified by a steep decrease in spin susceptibility behaving like the triangular-lattice Heisenberg model indicative of spin-charge separation at high temperatures. This suggests a new type of non-Fermi liquid, where interlayer charge-deconfimement is associated with spin-charge entanglement.
  • Topologically stable matters can have a long lifetime, even if thermodynamically costly, when the thermal agitation is sufficiently low. A magnetic skyrmion lattice (SkL) represents a unique form of long-range magnetic order that is topologically stable, and therefore, a long-lived, metastable SkL can form. Experimental observations of the SkL in bulk crystals, however, have mostly been limited to a finite and narrow temperature region in which the SkL is thermodynamically stable; thus, the benefits of the topological stability remain unclear. Here, we report a metastable SkL created by quenching a thermodynamically stable SkL. Hall-resistivity measurements of MnSi reveal that, although the metastable SkL is short-lived at high temperatures, the lifetime becomes prolonged (>> 1 week) at low temperatures. The manipulation of a delicate balance between thermal agitation and the topological stability enables a deterministic creation/annihilation of the metastable SkL by exploiting electric heating and subsequent rapid cooling, thus establishing a facile method to control the formation of a SkL.
  • Phase-change memory (PCM), a promising candidate for next-generation non-volatile memories, exploits quenched glassy and thermodynamically stable crystalline states as reversibly switchable state variables. We demonstrate PCM functions emerging from a charge-configuration degree of freedom in strongly correlated electron systems. Non-volatile reversible switching between a high-resistivity charge-crystalline (or charge-ordered) state and a low-resistivity quenched state, charge glass, is achieved experimentally via heat pulses supplied by optical or electrical means in organic conductors $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$$X$. Switching that is one order of magnitude faster is observed in another isostructural material that requires faster cooling to kinetically avoid charge crystallization, indicating that the material's critical cooling rate can be useful guidelines for pursuing a faster correlated-electron PCM function.
  • We report the pressure study of a doped organic superconductor with Hall coefficient and conductivity measurements. We find that maximally enhanced superconductivity and a non-Fermi liquid appear around a certain pressure where mobile carriers increase critically, suggesting a possible quantum phase transition between strongly and weakly correlated regimes. Our description extends the conventional picture of a Mott metal-insulator transition at half filling to the case of a doped Mott insulator with tunable correlation.