• The optimum scheme for geometric phase measurement in EAST Tokamak is proposed in this paper. The theoretical values of geometric phase for the probe beams of EAST Polarimeter-Interferometer (POINT) system are calculated by path integration in parameter space. Meanwhile, the influences of some controllable parameters on geometric phase are evaluated. The feasibility and challenge of distinguishing geometric effect in the POINT signal are also assessed in detail.
  • A unified ballooning theory, constructed on the basis of two special theories [Y. Z. Zhang, S. M. Mahajan, X. D. Zhang, Phys. Fluids B4, 2729 (1992); Y. Z. Zhang, T. Xie, Nucl. Fusion & Plasma Phys. 33, 193 (2013)], shows that a weak up-down asymmetric mode structure is normally formed in an up-down symmetric equilibrium; the weak up-down asymmetry in mode structure is the manifestation of non-trivial higher order effects beyond the standard ballooning equation. It is shown that the asymmetric mode may have even higher growth rate than symmetric modes. Salient features of the theory are illustrated by investigating a fluid model for the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. The two dimensional (2D) analytical form of ITG mode, solved in ballooning representation, is then converted into the radial-poloidal space to provide the natural boundary condition for solving the 2D mathematical local eigenmode problem. We find the analytical expression of mode structure in good agreement with finite difference solution. This sets a reliable framework for quasi-linear computation.
  • The Boris algorithm for integrating charged particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields is popular due to its simple implementation, rapid iteration, and observed long-term numerical fidelity. The underlying cause of this long-term fidelity has become a matter of controversy, with one article claiming the method to be symplectic [S. D. Webb, J. Comput. Phys. 270 (2014) 570], and others claiming the method to be volume preserving but not symplectic [e.g. H. Qin et al., Phys. Plasmas 20 (2013) 084503]. To resolve the discrepancy, this letter leverages a discrete Helmholtz condition to demonstrate that no variational formulation of the Boris algorithm exists, indicating that the long-term fidelity should be attributed to the volume-preserving properties of the algorithm.
  • We present a formulation of collisional gyrokinetic theory with exact conservation laws for energy and canonical toroidal momentum. Collisions are accounted for by a nonlinear gyrokinetic Landau operator. Gyroaveraging and linearization do not destroy the operator's conservation properties. Just as in ordinary kinetic theory, the conservation laws for collisional gyrokinetic theory are selected by the limiting collisionless gyrokinetic theory.
  • The difference between the guiding center phase-space Lagrangians derived in [J.W. Burby, J. Squire, and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas {\bf 20}, 072105 (2013)] and [F.I. Parra, and I. Calvo, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion {\bf 53}, 045001 (2011)] is due to a different definition of the guiding center coordinates. In this brief communication the difference between the guiding center coordinates is calculated explicitly.
  • The gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are cast as an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system. The gyrokinetic Poisson bracket is remarkably simple and similar to the Morrison-Marsden-Weinstein bracket for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. By identifying many of the bracket's Casimirs, this work enables (i) the derivation of gyrokinetic equilibrium variational principles and (ii) the application of the energy-Casimir method and the method of dynamically-accessible variations to study stability properties of gyrokinetic equilibria.
  • In accordance with the Keller-Maslov global WKB theory, a semiclassical scalar wave field is best encoded as a triple consisting of (i) a Lagrangian submanifold $\Lambda$ in the ray phase space, (ii) a density $\mu$ on $\Lambda$, and (iii) an overall phase factor $\phi$. We present the Hamiltonian structure of the Cauchy problem for such a "geometric semiclassical state" in the special case where the wave operator is Hermetian. Variational, symplectic, and Poisson formulations of the time evolution equations for $(\Lambda,\mu,\phi)$ are identitfied. Because we work in terms of the Keller-Maslov global WKB ansatz, as opposed to the more restrictive $\psi=a \exp(i S/\epsilon)$, all of our results are insensitive to the presence of caustics. In particular, because the variational principle is insensitive to caustics, the latter may be used to construct structure-perserving numerical integrators for scalar wave equations.
  • Finite-dimensional non-canonical Hamiltonian systems arise naturally from Hamilton's principle in phase space. We present a method for deriving variational integrators that can be applied to perturbed non-canonical Hamiltonian systems on manifolds based on discretizing this phase-space variational principle. Relative to the perturbation parameter $\epsilon$, this type of integrator can take $O(1)$ time steps with arbitrary accuracy in $\epsilon$ by leveraging the unperturbed dynamics. Moreover, these integrators are coordinate independent in the sense that their time-advance rules transform correctly when passing from one phase space coordinate system to another.
  • Backward error initialization and parasitic mode control are well-suited for use in algorithms that arise from a discrete variational principle on phase-space dynamics. Dynamical systems described by degenerate Lagrangians, such as those occurring in phase-space action principles, lead to variational multistep algorithms for the integration of first-order differential equations. As multistep algorithms, an initialization procedure must be chosen and the stability of parasitic modes assessed. The conventional selection of initial conditions using accurate one-step methods does not yield the best numerical performance for smoothness and stability. Instead, backward error initialization identifies a set of initial conditions that minimize the amplitude of undesirable parasitic modes. This issue is especially important in the context of structure-preserving multistep algorithms where numerical damping of the parasitic modes would violate the conservation properties. In the presence of growing parasitic modes, the algorithm may also be periodically re-initialized to prevent the undesired mode from reaching large amplitude. Numerical examples of variational multistep algorithms are presented in which the backward error initialized trajectories outperform those initialized using highly accurate approximations of the true solution.
  • We demonstrate a coined quantum walk over ten steps in a one-dimensional network of linear optical elements. By applying single-point phase defects, the translational symmetry of an ideal standard quantum walk is broken resulting in localization effect in a quantum walk architecture. We furthermore investigate how the level of phase due to single-point phase defects and coin settings influence the strength of the localization signature.
  • We report on the use of the recently-developed Mathematica package \emph{VEST} (Vector Einstein Summation Tools) to automatically derive the guiding center transformation. Our Mathematica code employs a recursive procedure to derive the transformation order-by-order. This procedure has several novel features. (1) It is designed to allow the user to easily explore the guiding center transformation's numerous non-unique forms or representations. (2) The procedure proceeds entirely in cartesian position and velocity coordinates, thereby producing manifestly gyrogauge invariant results; the commonly-used perpendicular unit vector fields $e_1,e_2$ are never even introduced. (3) It is easy to apply in the derivation of higher-order contributions to the guiding center transformation without fear of human error. Our code therefore stands as a useful tool for exploring subtle issues related to the physics of toroidal momentum conservation in tokamaks.
  • We show how to find the physical Langevin equation describing the trajectories of particles undergoing collisionless stochastic acceleration. These stochastic differential equations retain not only one-, but two-particle statistics, and inherit the Hamiltonian nature of the underlying microscopic equations. This opens the door to using stochastic variational integrators to perform simulations of stochastic interactions such as Fermi acceleration. We illustrate the theory by applying it to two example problems.
  • In the guiding center theory, smooth unit vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field are required to define the gyrophase. The question of global existence of these vectors is addressed using a general result from the theory of characteristic classes. It is found that there is, in certain cases, an obstruction to global existence. In these cases, the gyrophase cannot be defined globally. The implications of this fact on the basic structure of the guiding center theory are discussed. In particular it is demonstrated that the guiding center asymptotic expansion of the equations of motion can still be performed in a globally consistent manner when a single global convention for measuring gyrophase is unavailable. The latter fact is demonstrated directly by deriving a new expression for the guiding-center Poincar\'e-Cartan form exhibiting no dependence on the choice of perpendicular unit vectors.
  • We present a new variational principle for the gyrokinetic system, similar to the Maxwell-Vlasov action presented in Ref. 1. The variational principle is in the Eulerian frame and based on constrained variations of the phase space fluid velocity and particle distribution function. Using a Legendre transform, we explicitly derive the field theoretic Hamiltonian structure of the system. This is carried out with a modified Dirac theory of constraints, which is used to construct meaningful brackets from those obtained directly from Euler-Poincar\'{e} theory. Possible applications of these formulations include continuum geometric integration techniques, large-eddy simulation models and Casimir type stability methods. [1] H. Cendra et. al., Journal of Mathematical Physics 39, 3138 (1998)
  • In a GaN/AlGaN field-effect terahertz detector, the directional photocurrent is mapped in the two-dimensional space of the gate voltage and the drain/source bias. It is found that not only the magnitude, but also the polarity, of the photocurrent can be tuned. A quasistatic self-mixing model taking into account the localized terahertz field provides a quantitative description of the detector characteristics. Strongly localized self-mixing is confirmed. It is therefore important to engineer the spatial distribution of the terahertz field and its coupling to the field-effect channel on the sub-micron scale.
  • This physics book provides detailed discussions on important topics in $\tau$-charm physics that will be explored during the next few years at \bes3 . Both theoretical and experimental issues are covered, including extensive reviews of recent theoretical developments and experimental techniques. Among the subjects covered are: innovations in Partial Wave Analysis (PWA), theoretical and experimental techniques for Dalitz-plot analyses, analysis tools to extract absolute branching fractions and measurements of decay constants, form factors, and CP-violation and \DzDzb-oscillation parameters. Programs of QCD studies and near-threshold tau-lepton physics measurements are also discussed.
  • We present measurements on spin blockade in a laterally integrated quantum dot. The dot is tuned into the regime of strong Coulomb blockade, confining ~ 50 electrons. At certain electronic states we find an additional mechanism suppressing electron transport. This we identify as spin blockade at zero bias, possibly accompanied by a change in orbital momentum in subsequent dot ground states. We support this by probing the bias, magnetic field and temperature dependence of the transport spectrum. Weak violation of the blockade is modelled by detailed calculations of non-linear transport taking into account forbidden transitions.
  • We report on electron transport through an artificial molecule formed by two tunnel coupled quantum dots, which are laterally confined in a two-dimensional electron system of an Al$_x$Ga$_{1-x}$As/GaAs heterostructure. Coherent molecular states in the coupled dots are probed by photon-assisted tunneling (PAT). Above 10 GHz, we observe clear PAT as a result of the resonance between the microwave photons and the molecular states. Below 8 GHz, a pronounced superposition of phonon- and photon-assisted tunneling is observed. Coherent superposition of molecular states persists under excitation of acoustic phonons.
  • A small quantum dot containing approximately 20 electrons is realized in a two-dimensional electron system of an AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. Conventional transport and microwave spectroscopy reveal the dot's electronic structure. By applying a coherently coupled two-source technique, we are able to determine the complex microwave induced tunnel current. The amplitude of this photoconductance resolves photon-assisted tunneling (PAT) in the non-linear regime through the ground state and an excited state as well. The out-of-phase component (susceptance) allows to study charge relaxation within the quantum dot on a time scale comparable to the microwave beat period.
  • We present measurements on microwave spectroscopy on a double quantum dot with an on-chip microwave source. The quantum dots are realized in the two-dimensional electron gas of an AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure and are weakly coupled in series by a tunnelling barrier forming an 'ionic' molecular state. We employ a Josephson oscillator formed by a long Nb/Al-AlO$_x$/Nb junction as a microwave source. We find photon-assisted tunnelling sidebands induced by the Josephson oscillator, and compare the results with those obtained using an externally operated microwave source.