• Eruptive phenomena such as plasmoid ejections or jets are an important feature of solar activity with the potential for improving our understanding of the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Such ejections are often thought to be signatures of the outflows expected in regions of fast magnetic reconnection. The 304 A EUV line of Helium, formed at around 10^5 K, is found to be a reliable tracer of such phenomena, but the determination of physical parameters from such observations is not straightforward. We have observed a plasmoid ejection from an X-ray bright point simultaneously at millimeter wavelengths with ALMA, at EUV wavelengths with AIA, in soft X-rays with Hinode/XRT. This paper reports the physical parameters of the plasmoid obtained by combining the radio, EUV and X-ray data. As a result, we conclude that the plasmoid can consist either of (approximately) isothermal 10^5 K plasma that is optically thin at 100 GHz, or else a 10^4 K core with a hot envelope. The analysis demonstrates the value of the additional temperature and density constraints that ALMA provides, and future science observations with ALMA will be able to match the spatial resolution of space-borne and other high-resolution telescopes.
  • Coronal implosions - the convergence motion of plasmas and entrained magnetic field in the corona due to a reduction in magnetic pressure - can help to locate and track sites of magnetic energy release or redistribution during solar flares and eruptions. We report here on the analysis of a well-observed implosion in the form of an arcade contraction associated with a filament eruption, during the C3.5 flare SOL2013-06-19T07:29. A sequence of events including magnetic flux-rope instability and distortion, followed by filament eruption and arcade implosion, lead us to conclude that the implosion arises from the transfer of magnetic energy from beneath the arcade as part of the global magnetic instability, rather than due to local magnetic energy dissipation in the flare. The observed net contraction of the imploding loops, which is found also in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations, reflects a permanent reduction of magnetic energy underneath the arcade. This event shows that, in addition to resulting in expansion or eruption of overlying field, flux-rope instability can also simultaneously implode unopened field due to magnetic energy transfer. It demonstrates the "partial opening of the field" scenario, which is one of the ways in 3D to produce a magnetic eruption without violating the Aly-Sturrock hypothesis. In the framework of this observation we also propose a unification of three main concepts for active region magnetic evolution, namely the metastable eruption model, the implosion conjecture, and the standard "CSHKP" flare model.
  • We present the first observations of quiescent active regions (ARs) using NuSTAR, a focusing hard X-ray telescope capable of studying faint solar emission from high temperature and non-thermal sources. We analyze the first directly imaged and spectrally resolved X-rays above 2~keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures $3.1-4.4$~MK and emission measures $1-8\times 10^{46}$~cm$^{-3}$. We do not observe emission above 5~MK but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6~keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12~MK of $\sim 10^{46}$cm$^{-3}$ and $\sim 10^{43}$ cm$^{-3}$, respectively, at least an order of magnitude stricter than previous limits. With longer duration observations and a weakening solar cycle (resulting in an increased livetime), future NuSTAR observations will have sensitivity to a wider range of temperatures as well as possible non-thermal emission.
  • The sites of chromospheric excitation during solar flares are marked by extended extreme ultraviolet ribbons and hard X-ray footpoints. The standard interpretation is that these are the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons precipitating from the corona. We examine this picture using multi-wavelength observations of the early phase of an M-class flare SOL2010-08-07T18:24. We aim to determine the properties of the heated plasma in the flare ribbons, and to understand the partition of the power input into radiative and conductive losses. Using GOES, SDO/EVE, SDO/AIA and RHESSI we measure the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flare ribbons, and deduce approximate density values. The non-thermal emission measure, and the collisional thick target energy input to the ribbons are obtained from RHESSI using standard methods. We deduce the existence of a substantial amount of plasma at 10 MK in the flare ribbons, during the pre-impulsive and early-impulsive phase of the flare. The average column emission measure of this hot component is a few times 10^28/cm^5, and we can calculate that its predicted conductive losses dominate its measured radiative losses. If the power input to the hot ribbon plasma is due to collisional energy deposition by an electron beam from the corona then a low-energy cutoff of around 5 keV is necessary to balance the conductive losses, implying a very large electron energy content. Independent of the standard collisional thick-target electron beam interpretation, the observed non-thermal X-rays can be provided if one electron in 10^3 - 10^4 in the 10 MK (1 keV) ribbon plasma has an energy above 10 keV. We speculate that this could arise if a non-thermal tail is generated in the ribbon plasma which is being heated by other means, for example by waves or turbulence.
  • The physics of transient seismic emission in flares remains largely mysterious. Its discoverers proposed that these "sunquakes" are the signature of a shock driven by "thick-target heating" of the flaring chromosphere. H-{\alpha} observations show evidence for such a shock. However, simulations of shocks driven by impulsive chromospheric heating show withering radiative losses as the shock proceeds downward. The compression of the shocked gas heats and increases its density, making it more radiative. So, radiative losses increase radically with the strength of the shock. This has introduced doubt that sufficient energy from such a shock can penetrate into the solar interior to match that indicated by the helioseismic signatures. We point out that simulations of acoustic transients driven by impulsive heating have no account for magnetic fields characteristic of transient-seismic-source environments. These must have a major impact on the seismic flux conducted into the solar interior. A strong horizontal magnetic field, for example, greatly increases the compressional modulus of the chromospheric medium. This greatly reduces compression of the gas, hence the radiative losses as the transient passes through it. This could explain the strong affinity of seismic sources to regions of strong, highly inclined penumbral magnetic fields. The role of inclined magnetic fields, then, is fundamental to our understanding of the role of impulsive heating in transient seismic emission.
  • This contribution summarizes the splinter session "Non-thermal processes in coronae and beyond" held at the Cool Stars 17 workshop in Barcelona in 2012. It covers new developments in high energy non-thermal effects in the Earth's exosphere, solar and stellar flares, the diffuse emission in star forming regions and reviews the state and the challenges of the underlying atomic databases.
  • The most powerful explosions on the Sun [...] drive the most severe space-weather storms. Proxy records of flare energies based on SEPs in principle may offer the longest time base to study infrequent large events. We conclude that one suggested proxy, nitrate concentrations in polar ice cores, does not map reliably to SEP events. Concentrations of select radionuclides measured in natural archives may prove useful in extending the time interval of direct observations up to ten millennia, but as their calibration to solar flare fluences depends on multiple poorly known properties and processes, these proxies cannot presently be used to help determine the flare energy frequency distribution. Being thus limited to the use of direct flare observations, we evaluate the probabilities of large-energy solar explosions by combining solar flare observations with an ensemble of stellar flare observations. We conclude that solar flare energies form a relatively smooth distribution from small events to large flares, while flares on magnetically-active, young Sun-like stars have energies and frequencies markedly in excess of strong solar flares, even after an empirical scaling with the mean activity level of these stars. In order to empirically quantify the frequency of uncommonly large solar flares extensive surveys of stars of near-solar age need to be obtained, such as is feasible with the Kepler satellite. Because the likelihood of flares larger than approximately X30 remains empirically unconstrained, we present indirect arguments, based on records of sunspots and on statistical arguments, that solar flares in the past four centuries have likely not substantially exceeded the level of the largest flares observed in the space era, and that there is at most about a 10% chance of a flare larger than about X30 in the next 30 years.
  • This summary reports on papers presented at the Cool Stars-16 meeting in the splinter session "Solar and Stellar flares." Although many topics were discussed, the main themes were the commonality of interests, and of physics, between the solar and stellar flare communities, and the opportunities for important new observations in the near future.
  • This review surveys the statistics of solar X-ray flares, emphasising the new views that RHESSI has given us of the weaker events (the microflares). The new data reveal that these microflares strongly resemble more energetic events in most respects; they occur solely within active regions and exhibit high-temperature/nonthermal emissions in approximately the same proportion as major events. We discuss the distributions of flare parameters (e.g., peak flux) and how these parameters correlate, for instance via the Neupert effect. We also highlight the systematic biases involved in intercomparing data representing many decades of event magnitude. The intermittency of the flare/microflare occurrence, both in space and in time, argues that these discrete events do not explain general coronal heating, either in active regions or in the quiet Sun.
  • We use more than 4,500 microflares from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) microflare data set (Christe et al., 2008, Ap. J., 677, 1385) to estimate electron densities and volumetric filling factors of microflare loops using a cooling time analysis. We show that if the filling factor is assumed to be unity, the calculated conductive cooling times are much shorter than the observed flare decay times, which in turn are much shorter than the calculated radiative cooling times. This is likely unphysical, but the contradic- tion can be resolved by assuming the radiative and conductive cooling times are comparable, which is valid when the flare loop temperature is a maximum and when external heating can be ignored. We find that resultant radiative and con- ductive cooling times are comparable to observed decay times, which has been used as an assumption in some previous studies. The inferred electron densities have a mean value of 10^11.6 cm^-3 and filling factors have a mean of 10^-3.7. The filling factors are lower and densities are higher than previous estimates for large flares, but are similar to those found for two microflares by Moore et al. (Ap. J., 526, 505, 1999).
  • We present new RHESSI upper limits in the 3-200 keV energy range for solar hard X-ray emission in the absence of flares and active regions, i.e. the quiet Sun, using data obtained between July 2005 and April 2009. These new limits, substantially deeper than any previous ones, constrain several physical processes that could produce hard X-ray emission. These include cosmic-ray effects and the generation of axions within the solar core. The data also limit the properties of "nanoflares", a leading candidate to explain coronal heating. We find it unlikely for nanoflares involving nonthermal effects to heat the corona because such events would require a steep electron spectrum E^{-\delta} with index \delta > 5 extending to very low energies (<1 keV), into the thermal energy range. We also use the limits to constrain the parameter space of an isothermal model and coronal thin-target emission models (powerlaw and kappa distributions)
  • We use Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements from the VIRGO (Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations) instrument on board SOHO to obtain preliminary estimates of the mean total radiative energy emitted by X-class solar flares. The basic tool is that of summed-epoch analysis, which has also enabled us to detect and partially characterize systematic errors present in the basic data. We describe these errors, which significantly degrade the photometry at high frequencies. We find the ratio of GOES 1-8\{AA} luminosity to total bolometric luminosity to be of order 0.01.
  • Type III solar radio storms, observed at frequencies below approximately 16 MHz by space borne radio experiments, correspond to the quasi-continuous, bursty emission of electron beams onto open field lines above active regions. The mechanisms by which a storm can persist in some cases for more than a solar rotation whilst exhibiting considerable radio activity are poorly understood. To address this issue, the statistical properties of a type III storm observed by the STEREO/WAVES radio experiment are presented, examining both the brightness distribution and (for the first time) the waiting-time distribution. Single power law behavior is observed in the number distribution as a function of brightness; the power law index is approximately 2.1 and is largely independent of frequency. The waiting-time distribution is found to be consistent with a piecewise-constant Poisson process. This indicates that during the storm individual type III bursts occur independently and suggests that the storm dynamics are consistent with avalanche type behavior in the underlying active region.
  • The magnetic field of the solar corona has a large-scale dipole character, which maps into the bipolar field in the solar wind. Using standard representations of the coronal field, we show that high-energy ions can be trapped stably in these large-scale closed fields. The drift shells that describe the conservation of the third adiabatic invariant may have complicated geometries. Particles trapped in these zones would resemble the Van Allen Belts and could have detectable consequences. We discuss potential sources of trapped particles.
  • The impulsive phase of a solar flare marks the epoch of rapid conversion of energy stored in the pre-flare coronal magnetic field. Hard X-ray observations imply that a substantial fraction of flare energy released during the impulsive phase is converted to the kinetic energy of mildly relativistic electrons (10-100 keV). The liberation of the magnetic free energy can occur as the coronal magnetic field reconfigures and relaxes following reconnection. We investigate a scenario in which products of the reconfiguration - large-scale Alfven wave pulses - transport the energy and magnetic-field changes rapidly through the corona to the lower atmosphere. This offers two possibilities for electron acceleration. Firstly, in a coronal plasma with beta < m_e/m_p, the waves propagate as inertial Alfven waves. In the presence of strong spatial gradients, these generate field-aligned electric fields that can accelerate electrons to energies on the order of 10 keV and above, including by repeated interactions between electrons and wavefronts. Secondly, when they reflect and mode-convert in the chromosphere, a cascade to high wavenumbers may develop. This will also accelerate electrons by turbulence, in a medium with a locally high electron number density. This concept, which bridges MHD-based and particle-based views of a flare, provides an interpretation of the recently-observed rapid variations of the line-of-sight component of the photospheric magnetic field across the flare impulsive phase, and offers solutions to some perplexing flare problems, such as the flare "number problem" of finding and resupplying sufficient electrons to explain the impulsive-phase hard X-ray emission.
  • We present X-ray imaging and spectral analysis of all microflares the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observed between March 2002 and March 2007, a total of 25,705 events. These microflares are small flares, from low GOES C Class to below A Class (background subtracted) and are associated with active regions. They were found by searching the 6-12 keV energy range during periods when the full sensitivity of RHESSI's detectors was available (see paper I). Each microflare is automatically analyzed at the peak time of the 6-12 keV emission: the thermal source size is found by forward-fitting the complex visibilities for 4-8 keV, and the spectral parameters (temperature, emission measure, power-law index) are found by forward fitting a thermal plus non-thermal model. The combination of these parameters allows us to present the first statistical analysis of the thermal and non-thermal energy at the peak times of microflares.
  • Investigate particle acceleration and heating in a solar microflare. In a microflare with non-thermal emission to remarkably high energies ($>50$ keV), we investigate the hard X-rays with RHESSI imaging and spectroscopy and the resulting thermal emission seen in soft X-rays with Hinode/XRT and in EUV with TRACE. The non-thermal footpoints observed with RHESSI spatially and temporally match bright footpoint emission in soft X-rays and EUV. There is the possibility that the non-thermal spectrum extends down to 4 keV. The hard X-ray burst clearly does not follow the expected Neupert effect, with the time integrated hard X-rays not matching the soft X-ray time profile. So although this is a simple microflare with good X-ray observation coverage it does not fit the standard flare model.
  • We present the first results using the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI, to observe solar X-ray emission not associated with active regions, sunspots or flares (the quiet Sun). Using a newly developed chopping technique (fan-beam modulation) during seven periods of offpointing between June 2005 to October 2006, we obtained upper limits over 3-200 keV for the quietest times when the GOES12 1-8A flux fell below $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$. These values are smaller than previous limits in the 17-120 keV range and extend them to both lower and higher energies. The limit in 3-6 keV is consistent with a coronal temperature $\leq 6$ MK. For quiet Sun periods when the GOES12 1-8A background flux was between $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$ and $10^{-7}$ Wm$^{-2}$, the RHESSI 3-6 keV flux correlates to this as a power-law, with an index of $1.08 \pm 0.13$. The power-law correlation for microflares has a steeper index of $1.29 \pm 0.06$. We also discuss the possibility of observing quiet Sun X-rays due to solar axions and use the RHESSI quiet Sun limits to estimate the axion-to-photon coupling constant for two different axion emission scenarios.