• Recent extensive data from the beam energy scan of the STAR collaboration at BNL-RHIC provide the basis for a detailed update for the universal behavior of the strangeness suppression factor gamma_s as function of the initial entropy density, as proposed in our recent paper [1]. [1] P. Castorina, S. Plumari and H. Satz, Int. J. Mod. Phys. E26 (2017) 1750081 (arXiv:1709.02706)
  • This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme.
  • The interpretation of quark ($q$)- antiquark ($\bar q$) pairs production and the sequential string breaking as tunneling through the event horizon of colour confinement leads to a thermal hadronic spectrum with a universal Unruh temperature, $T \simeq 165$ Mev,related to the quark acceleration, $a$, by $T=a/2\pi$. The resulting temperature depends on the quark mass and then on the content of the produced hadrons, causing a deviation from full equilibrium and hence a suppression of strange particle production in elementary collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions, where the quark density is much bigger, one has to introduce an average temperature (acceleration) which dilutes the quark mass effect and the strangeness suppression almost disappears.
  • The thermal multihadron production observed in different high energy collisions poses many basic problems: why do even elementary, $e^+e^-$ and hadron-hadron, collisions show thermal behaviour? Why is there in such interactions a suppression of strange particle production? Why does the strangeness suppression almost disappear in relativistic heavy ion collisions? Why in these collisions is the thermalization time less than $\simeq 0.5$ fm/c? We show that the recently proposed mechanism of thermal hadron production through Hawking-Unruh radiation can naturally answer the previous questions. Indeed, the interpretation of quark- antiquark pairs production, by the sequential string breaking, as tunneling through the event horizon of colour confinement leads to thermal behavior with a universal temperature, $T \simeq 170$ Mev,related to the quark acceleration, a, by $T=a/2\pi$. The resulting temperature depends on the quark mass and then on the content of the produced hadrons, causing a deviation from full equilibrium and hence a suppression of strange particle production in elementary collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions, where the quark density is much bigger, one has to introduce an average temperature (acceleration) which dilutes the quark mass effect and the strangeness suppression almost disappears.
  • We study the properties of charmonium states at finite temperature in quenched lattice QCD on large and fine isotropic lattices. We perform a detailed analysis of charmonium correlation and spectral functions both below and above Tc. Our analysis suggests that the S wave states disappear at about 1.5 Tc. The charm diffusion coefficient is estimated and found to be approximately 1/{\pi}T at 1.5Tc {\leq} T {\leq} 3Tc.
  • We study the properties of charmonium states at finite temperature in quenched QCD on large and fine isotropic lattices. We perform a detailed analysis of charmonium correlation and spectral functions both below and above $T_c$. Our analysis suggests that both S wave states ($J/\psi$ and $\eta_c$) and P wave states ($\chi_{c0}$ and $\chi_{c1}$) disappear already at about $1.5 T_c$. The charm diffusion coefficient is estimated through the Kubo formula and found to be compatible with zero below $T_c$ and approximately $1/\pi T$ at $1.5 T_c\lesssim T\lesssim 3 T_c$.
  • We study the centrality dependence to be expected if only charmonium production in the corona survives in high energy nuclear collisions, with full suppression in the hot, deconfined core. To eliminate cold nuclear matter effects as far as possible, we consider the ratio of charmonium to open charm production. The centrality dependence of this ratio is found to follow a universal geometric form, applicable to both RHIC and LHC in collisions at central and forward rapidities.
  • We analyze the low frequency part of charmonium spectral functions on large lattices close to the continuum limit in the temperature region $1.5\lesssim T/T_c\lesssim 3$ as well as for $T \simeq 0.75T_c$. We present evidence for the existence of a transport peak above $T_c$ and its absence below $T_c$. The heavy quark diffusion constant is then estimated using the Kubo formula. As part of the calculation we also determine the temperature dependence of the signature for the charmonium bound state in the spectral function and discuss the fate of charmonium states in the hot medium.
  • We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Thereafter, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in a broader perspective, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.
  • We study the properties of charmonium states at finite temperature in quenched QCD on isotropic lattices. We measured charmonium correlators using non-perturbatively $\cO(a)$ improved clover fermions on fine ($a=0.01$ fm) lattices with a relatively large size of $128^{3}\times 96$, $128^3\times48$, $128^3\times32$ and $128^3\times24$ at $0.73~T_c$, $1.46~T_c$, $2.20~T_c$ and $2.93~T_c$, respectively. Our analysis suggests that $\Jpsi$ is melted already at $1.46~T_c$ and $\eta_c$ starts to dissolve at $1.46~T_c$ and does not exist at higher temperatures. We also identify the heavy quark transport contribution at the spectral function level for the first time.
  • We consider the possibility that color deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration do not coincide in dense baryonic matter at low temperature. As a consequence, a state of massive "constituent" quarks would exist as an intermediate phase between confined nuclear matter and the plasma of deconfined massless quarks and gluons. We discuss the properties of this state and its relation to the recently proposed quarkyonic matter.
  • We argue that features of hadron production in relativistic nuclear collisions, mainly at CERN-SPS energies, may be explained by the existence of three forms of matter: Hadronic Matter, Quarkyonic Matter, and a Quark-Gluon Plasma. We suggest that these meet at a triple point in the QCD phase diagram. Some of the features explained, both qualitatively and semi-quantitatively, include the curve for the decoupling of chemical equilibrium, along with the non-monotonic behavior of strange particle multiplicity ratios at center of mass energies near 10 GeV. If the transition(s) between the three phases are merely crossover(s), the triple point is only approximate.
  • We perform a systematic comparison of the statistical model parametrization of hadron abundances measured in high energy pp, AA and e+e- collisions. The basic aim of the study is to test if the quality of the description depends on the nature of the collision process. In particular, we want to see if nuclear collisions, with multiple initial interactions, lead to "more thermal" average multiplicities than elementary pp collisions or e+e- annihilation. Such a comparison is meaningful only if it is based on data for the same or similar hadronic species and if the analyzed data has quantitatively similar errors. When these requirements are maintained, the quality of the statistical model description is found to be the same for the different initial collision configurations.
  • We study charmonium correlators and spectral functions in quenched QCD, using Clover improved Wilson fermions on very fine (0.015 fm) isotropic lattices at 0.75 Tc and 1.5 Tc. We use a new approach to distinguish the zero mode contribution from the other contributions. Once this is removed, we find that the ratios of correlators to reconstructed correlators remain almost unity at all distances. The ground state peaks of spectral functions obtained at 0.75 Tc are reliable and robust. The present accuracy and limited number of points in the temporal direction at 1.5 Tc do not allow for a reliable conclusion about a possible melting of charmonium states in the QGP.
  • We calculate the speed of sound $c_s$ in an ideal gas of resonances whose mass spectrum is assumed to have the Hagedorn form $\rho(m) \sim m^{-a}\exp{bm}$, which leads to singular behavior at the critical temperature $T_c = 1/b$. With $a = 4$ the pressure and the energy density remain finite at $T_c$, while the specific heat diverges there. As a function of the temperature the corresponding speed of sound initially increases similarly to that of an ideal pion gas until near $T_c$ where the resonance effects dominate causing $c_s$ to vanish as $(T_c - T)^{1/4}$. In order to compare this result to the physical resonance gas models, we introduce an upper cut-off M in the resonance mass integration. Although the truncated form still decreases somewhat in the region around $T_c$, the actual critical behavior in these models is no longer present.
  • We present an operational approach to address the in-medium behavior of charmonium and analyze the reliability of maximum entropy method (MEM). We study the dependences of the ratio of correlators to the reconstructed one and the free one on the resonance's width and the continuum's threshold. Furthermore, we discuss the issue of the default model dependence of the spectral function obtained from MEM.
  • We summarise the perspectives on heavy-quarkonium production at the LHC, both for proton-proton and heavy-ion runs, as emanating from the round table held at the HLPW 2008 Conference. The main topics are: present experimental and theoretical knowledge, experimental capabilities, open questions, recent theoretical advances and potentialities linked to some new observables.
  • We conjecture that because of color confinement, the physical vacuum forms an event horizon for quarks and gluons which can be crossed only by quantum tunneling, i.e., through the QCD counterpart of Hawking radiation by black holes. Since such radiation cannot transmit information to the outside, it must be thermal, of a temperature determined by the chromodynamic force at the confinement surface, and it must maintain color neutrality. We explore the possibility that the resulting process provides a common mechanism for thermal hadron production in high energy interactions, from $e^+e^-$ annihilation to heavy ion collisions.
  • Finite temperature lattice QCD indicates that the charmonium ground state J/psi can survive in a quark-gluon plasma up to 1.5 T_c or more, while the excited states chi_c and psi-prime are dissociated just above T_c. We assume that the chi_c suffers the same form of suppression as that observed for the psi-prime in SPS experiments, and that the directly produced J/psi is unaffected at presently available energy densities. This provides a parameter-free description of J/psi and psi-prime suppression which agrees quite well with that observed in SPS and RHIC data.
  • This report is the result of the collaboration and research effort of the Quarkonium Working Group over the last three years. It provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in heavy-quarkonium theory and experiment, covering quarkonium spectroscopy, decay, and production, the determination of QCD parameters from quarkonium observables, quarkonia in media, and the effects on quarkonia of physics beyond the Standard Model. An introduction to common theoretical and experimental tools is included. Future opportunities for research in quarkonium physics are also discussed.
  • We study the free energy of a heavy quark-antiquark pair in a thermal medium. We constuct a simple ansatz for the free energy for two quark flavors motivated by the Debye-H\"uckel theory of screening.
  • We present the results from the heavy quarks and quarkonia working group. This report gives benchmark heavy quark and quarkonium cross sections for $pp$ and $pA$ collisions at the LHC against which the $AA$ rates can be compared in the study of the quark-gluon plasma. We also provide an assessment of the theoretical uncertainties in these benchmarks. We then discuss some of the cold matter effects on quarkonia production, including nuclear absorption, scattering by produced hadrons, and energy loss in the medium. Hot matter effects that could reduce the observed quarkonium rates such as color screening and thermal activation are then discussed. Possible quarkonium enhancement through coalescence of uncorrelated heavy quarks and antiquarks is also described. Finally, we discuss the capabilities of the LHC detectors to measure heavy quarks and quarkonia as well as the Monte Carlo generators used in the data analysis.
  • Parton percolation provides geometric deconfinement in the pre-equilibrium stage of nuclear collisions. The resulting parton condensate can lead to charmonium suppression. We formulate a local percolation condition viable for non-uniform collision environments and show that it correctly reproduces the suppression observed for S-U and Pb-Pb collisions at the SPS. Using this formulation, we then determine the behavior of J/Psi suppression for In-In collisions at the SPS and for Au-Au collisions at RHIC.
  • Matter implies the existence of a large-scale connected cluster of a uniform nature. The appearance of such clusters as function of hadron density is specified by percolation theory. We can therefore formulate the freeze-out of interacting hadronic matter in terms of the percolation of hadronic clusters. The resulting freeze-out condition as function of temperature and baryo-chemical potential interpolates between resonance gas behaviour at low baryon density and repulsive nucleonic matter at low temperature, and it agrees well with data.
  • An essential prerequisite for quark-gluon plasma production in nuclear collisions is cross-talk between the partons from different nucleons in the colliding nuclei. The initial density of partons is determined by the parton distribution functions obtained from deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering and by the nuclear geometry; it increases with increasing $A$ and/or $\sqrt s$. In the transverse collision plane, this results in clusters of overlapping partons, and at some critical density, the cluster size suddenly reaches the size of the system. The onset of large-scale cross-talk through color connection thus occurs as geometric critical behavior. Percolation theory specifies the details of this transition, which leads to the formation of a condensate of deconfined partons. Given sufficient time, this condensate could eventually thermalize. However, already the onset of parton condensation in the initial state, without subsequent thermalization, leads to a number of interesting observable consequences.