• We present LOFAR $120-168$ MHz images of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 1240 that hosts double radio relics. In combination with the GMRT $595-629$ MHz and VLA $2-4$ GHz data, we characterised the spectral and polarimetric properties of the radio emission. The spectral indices for the relics steepen from their outer edges towards the cluster centre and the electric field vectors are approximately perpendicular to the major axes of the relics. The results are consistent with the picture that these relics trace large-scale shocks propagating outwards during the merger. Assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), we obtain shock Mach numbers of $\mathcal{M}=2.4$ and $2.3$ for the northern and southern shocks, respectively. For $\mathcal{M}\lesssim3$ shocks, a pre-existing population of mildly relativistic electrons is required to explain the brightness of the relics due to the high ($>10$ per cent) particle acceleration efficiency required. However, for $\mathcal{M}\gtrsim4$ shocks the required efficiency is $\gtrsim1\%$ and $\gtrsim0.5\%$, respectively, which is low enough for shock acceleration directly from the thermal pool. We used the fractional polarization to constrain the viewing angle to $\geqslant(53\pm3)^\circ$ and $\geqslant(39\pm5)^\circ$ for the northern and southern shocks, respectively. We found no evidence for diffuse emission in the cluster central region. If the halo spans the entire region between the relics ($\sim1.8\,\text{Mpc}$) our upper limit on the power is $P_\text{1.4 GHz}=(1.4\pm0.6)\times10^{23}\,\text{W}\text{Hz}^{-1}$ which is approximately equal to the anticipated flux from a cluster of this mass. However, if the halo is smaller than this, our constraints on the power imply that the halo is underluminous.
  • Ultra-steep spectrum (USS) radio sources are good tracers of powerful radio galaxies at $z > 2$. Identification of even a single bright radio galaxy at $z > 6$ can be used to detect redshifted 21cm absorption due to neutral hydrogen in the intervening IGM. Here we describe a new sample of high-redshift radio galaxy (HzRG) candidates constructed from the TGSS ADR1 survey at 150 MHz. We employ USS selection ($\alpha \le -1.3$) in $\sim10000$ square degrees, in combination with strict size selection and non-detections in all-sky optical and infrared surveys. We apply flux density cuts that probe a unique parameter space in flux density ($50 < S_{\textrm{150}} < 200$ mJy) to build a sample of 32 HzRG candidates. Follow-up Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 1.4 GHz with an average beam size of $1.3$ arcseconds ($"$) revealed $\sim 48\%$ of sources to have a single radio component. P-band (370 MHz) imaging of 17 of these sources revealed a flattening radio SED for ten sources at low frequencies, which is expected from compact HzRGs. Two of our sources lie in fields where deeper multi-wavelength photometry and ancillary radio data are available and for one of these we find a best-fit photo-z of $4.8 \pm 2.0$. The other source has $z_{\textrm{phot}}=1.4 \pm 0.1$ and a small angular size ($3.7"$), which could be associated with an obscured star forming galaxy or with a "dead" elliptical. One USS radio source not part of the HzRG sample but observed with the VLA nonetheless is revealed to be a candidate giant radio galaxy with a host galaxy photo-z of $1.8\pm0.5$, indicating a size of 875 kpc.
  • We describe an image-based method that uses two radio criteria, compactness and spectral index, to identify promising pulsar candidates among Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) unassociated sources. These criteria are applied to those radio sources from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope all-sky survey at 150 MHz (TGSS ADR1) found within the error ellipses of unassociated sources from the 3FGL catalog and a preliminary source list based on 7 years of LAT data. After follow-up interferometric observations to identify extended or variable sources, a list of 16 compact, steep-spectrum candidates is generated. An ongoing search for pulsations in these candidates, in gamma rays and radio, has found six millisecond pulsars and one normal pulsar. A comparison of this method with existing selection criteria based on gamma-ray spectral and variability properties suggests that the pulsar discovery space using Fermi may be larger than previously thought. Radio imaging is a hitherto underutilized source selection method that can be used, as with other multi-wavelength techniques, in the search for Fermi pulsars.
  • A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources whose origins are investigated through multi-wavelength studies of cluster samples. We investigate the presence of diffuse radio emission in a sample of seven galaxy clusters in the largely unexplored intermediate redshift range (0.3 < z < 0.44). In search of diffuse emission, deep radio imaging of the clusters are presented from wide band (1.1-3.1 GHz), full resolution ($\sim$ 5 arcsec) observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The visibilities were also imaged at lower resolution after point source modelling and subtraction and after a taper was applied to achieve better sensitivity to low surface brightness diffuse radio emission. In case of non-detection of diffuse sources, we set upper limits for the radio power of injected diffuse radio sources in the field of our observations. Furthermore, we discuss the dynamical state of the observed clusters based on an X-ray morphological analysis with XMM-Newton. We detect a giant radio halo in PSZ2 G284.97-23.69 (z=0.39) and a possible diffuse source in the nearly relaxed cluster PSZ2 G262.73-40.92 (z=0.421). Our sample contains three highly disturbed massive clusters without clear traces of diffuse emission at the observed frequencies. We were able to inject modelled radio halos with low values of total flux density to set upper detection limits; however, with our high-frequency observations we cannot exclude the presence of RH in these systems because of the sensitivity of our observations in combination with the high z of the observed clusters.
  • The radio spectral index is a powerful probe for classifying cosmic radio sources and understanding the origin of the radio emission. Combining data at 147 MHz and 1.4 GHz from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), we produced a large-area radio spectral index map of ~80 per cent of the sky (Dec > -40 deg), as well as a radio spectral index catalogue containing 1,396,515 sources, of which 503,647 are not upper or lower limits. Almost every TGSS source has a detected counterpart, while this is true only for 36 per cent of NVSS sources. We released both the map and the catalogue to the astronomical community. The catalogue is analysed to discover systematic behaviours in the cosmic radio population. We find a differential spectral behaviour between faint and bright sources as well as between compact and extended sources. These trends are explained in terms of radio galaxy evolution. We also confirm earlier reports of an excess of steep-spectrum sources along the galactic plane. This corresponds to 86 compact and steep-spectrum source in excess compared to expectations. The properties of this excess are consistent with normal non-recycled pulsars, which may have been missed by pulsation searches due to larger than average scattering along the line of sight.
  • We report L-band VLA observations of 1RXS J0603.3+4214, a cluster that hosts a bright radio relic, known as the Toothbrush, and an elongated giant radio halo. These new observations allow us to study the surface brightness distribution down to one arcsec resolution with very high sensitivity. Our images provide an unprecedented detailed view of the Toothbrush, revealing enigmatic filamentary structures. To study the spectral index distribution, we complement our analysis with published LOFAR and GMRT observations. The bright `brush' of the Toothbrush shows a prominent narrow ridge to its north with a sharp outer edge. The spectral index at the ridge is in the range $-0.70\leq\alpha\leq-0.80$. We suggest that the ridge is caused by projection along the line of sight. With a simple toy model for the smallest region of the ridge, we conclude that the magnetic field is below $5\,\rm\mu G$ and varies significantly across the shock front. Our model indicates that the actual Mach number is higher than that obtained from the injection index and agrees well with the one derived from the overall spectrum, namely ${\cal M}=3.78^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$. The radio halo shows an average spectral index of $\alpha=-1.16\pm0.05$ and a slight gradient from north to south. The southernmost part of the halo is steeper and possibly related to a shock front. Excluding the southernmost part, the halo morphology agrees very well with the X-ray morphology. A power-law correlation is found between the radio and X-ray surface brightness
  • We present a deep, low-frequency radio continuum study of the nearby Fanaroff--Riley class I (FR I) radio galaxy 3C 31 using a combination of LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR; 30--85 and 115--178 MHz), Very Large Array (VLA; 290--420 MHz), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 609 MHz) and Giant Metre Radio Telescope (GMRT; 615 MHz) observations. Our new LOFAR 145-MHz map shows that 3C 31 has a largest physical size of $1.1$ Mpc in projection, which means 3C 31 now falls in the class of giant radio galaxies. We model the radio continuum intensities with advective cosmic-ray transport, evolving the cosmic-ray electron population and magnetic field strength in the tails as functions of distance to the nucleus. We find that if there is no in-situ particle acceleration in the tails, then decelerating flows are required that depend on radius $r$ as $v\propto r^{\beta}$ ($\beta\approx -1$). This then compensates for the strong adiabatic losses due to the lateral expansion of the tails. We are able to find self-consistent solutions in agreement with the entrainment model of Croston & Hardcastle, where the magnetic field provides $\approx$$1/3$ of the pressure needed for equilibrium with the surrounding intra-cluster medium (ICM). We obtain an advective time-scale of $\approx$$190$ Myr, which, if equated to the source age, would require an average expansion Mach number ${\cal M} \approx 5$ over the source lifetime. Dynamical arguments suggest that instead, either the outer tail material does not represent the oldest jet plasma or else the particle ages are underestimated due to the effects of particle acceleration on large scales.
  • Galaxy clusters are the most massive constituents of the large-scale structure of the Universe. While the hot thermal gas that pervades galaxy clusters is relatively well understood through observations with X-ray satellites, our understanding of the non-thermal part of the intra-cluster medium remains incomplete. With LOFAR and GMRT observations, we have identified a phenomenon that can be unveiled only at extremely low radio-frequencies and offers new insights into the non-thermal component. We propose that the interplay between radio-emitting plasma and the perturbed intra-cluster medium can gently re-energise relativistic particles initially injected by active galactic nuclei. Sources powered through this mechanism can maintain electrons at higher energies than radiative ageing would allow. If this mechanism is common for aged plasma, a population of mildly relativistic electrons can be accumulated inside galaxy clusters providing the seed population for merger-induced re-acceleration mechanisms on larger scales such as turbulence and shock waves.
  • We present radio observations of the galaxy cluster PLCK G004.5-19.5 ($z=0.52$) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 150~MHz, 325~MHz, and 610~MHz. We find an unusual arrangement of diffuse radio emission in the center and periphery of the cluster, as well as several radio galaxies with head-tail emission. A patch of peripheral emission resembles a radio relic, and central emission resembles a radio halo. Reanalysis of archival XMM-Newton X-ray data shows that PLCK G004.5-19.5 is disturbed, which has a known correlation with the existence of radio relics and halos. Given that the number of known radio halos and radio relics at $z>0.5$ is very limited, PLCK G004.5-19.5 is an important addition to understanding merger-related particle acceleration at higher redshifts.
  • The current generation of experiments aiming to detect the neutral hydrogen signal from the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) is likely to be limited by systematic effects associated with removing foreground sources from target fields. In this paper we develop a model for the compact foreground sources in one of the target fields of the MWA's EoR key science experiment: the `EoR1' field. The model is based on both the MWA's GLEAM survey and GMRT 150 MHz data from the TGSS survey, the latter providing higher angular resolution and better astrometric accuracy for compact sources than is available from the MWA alone. The model contains 5049 sources, some of which have complicated morphology in MWA data, Fornax A being the most complex. The higher resolution data show that 13% of sources that appear point-like to the MWA have complicated morphology such as double and quad structure, with a typical separation of 33~arcsec. We derive an analytic expression for the error introduced into the EoR two-dimensional power spectrum due to peeling close double sources as single point sources and show that for the measured source properties, the error in the power spectrum is confined to high $k_\bot$ modes that do not affect the overall result for the large-scale cosmological signal of interest. The brightest ten mis-modelled sources in the field contribute 90% of the power bias in the data, suggesting that it is most critical to improve the models of the brightest sources. With this hybrid model we reprocess data from the EoR1 field and show a maximum of 8% improved calibration accuracy and a factor of two reduction in residual power in $k$-space from peeling these sources. Implications for future EoR experiments including the SKA are discussed in relation to the improvements obtained.
  • Previous studies have shown that CIZA J2242.8+5301 (the 'Sausage' cluster, $z=0.192$) is a massive merging galaxy cluster that hosts a radio halo and multiple relics. In this paper we present deep, high fidelity, low-frequency images made with the LOw-Frequency Array (LOFAR) between 115.5 and 179 MHz. These images, with a noise of 140 mJy/beam and a resolution of $\theta_{\text{beam}}=7.3"\times5.3"$, are an order of magnitude more sensitive and five times higher resolution than previous low-frequency images of this cluster. We combined the LOFAR data with the existing GMRT (153, 323, 608 MHz) and WSRT (1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 GHz) data to study the spectral properties of the radio emission from the cluster. Assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), we found Mach numbers of $\mathcal{M}_{n}=2.7{}_{-0.3}^{+0.6}$ and $\mathcal{M}_{s}=1.9_{-0.2}^{+0.3}$ for the northern and southern shocks. The derived Mach number for the northern shock requires an acceleration efficiency of several percent to accelerate electrons from the thermal pool, which is challenging for DSA. Using the radio data, we characterised the eastern relic as a shock wave propagating outwards with a Mach number of $\mathcal{M}_{e}=2.4_{-0.3}^{+0.5}$, which is in agreement with $\mathcal{M}_{e}^{X}=2.5{}_{-0.2}^{+0.6}$ that we derived from Suzaku data. The eastern shock is likely to be associated with the major cluster merger. The radio halo was measured with a flux of $346\pm64\,\text{mJy}$ at $145\,\text{MHz}$. Across the halo, we observed a spectral index that remains approximately constant ($\alpha^{\text{145 MHz-2.3 GHz}}_{\text{across \(\sim\)1 Mpc}^2}=-1.01\pm0.10$) after the steepening in the post-shock region of the northern relic. This suggests a generation of post-shock turbulence that re-energies aged electrons.
  • We present a low-frequency view of the Perseus cluster with new observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 230-470 MHz. The data reveal a multitude of new structures associated with the mini-halo. The mini-halo seems to be influenced both by the AGN activity as well as by the sloshing motion of the cool core cluster's gas. In addition, it has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in radio relics found in merging clusters. We present a detailed description of the data reduction and imaging process of the dataset. The depth and resolution of the observations allow us to conduct for the first time a detailed comparison of the mini-halo structure with the X-ray structure as seen in the Chandra X-ray images. The resulting image shows very clearly that the mini-halo emission is mostly contained behind the cold fronts, similar to that predicted by simulations of gas sloshing in galaxy clusters. However, due to the proximity of the Perseus cluster, as well as the quality of the data at low radio frequencies and at X-ray wavelengths, we also find evidence of fine structure. This structure includes several radial radio filaments extending in different directions, a concave radio structure associated with the southern X-ray bay and sharp edges that correlate with X-ray edges. Mini-halos are therefore not simply diffuse, uniform radio sources, but are rather filled with a rich variety of complex structures. These results illustrate the high-quality images that can be obtained with the new JVLA at low radio-frequencies, as well as the necessity to obtain deeper, higher-fidelity radio images of mini-halos and halos in clusters to further understand their origin.
  • We present a new analysis of the widely used relation between cavity power and radio luminosity in clusters of galaxies with evidence for strong AGN feedback. We study the correlation at low radio frequencies using two new surveys - the First Alternative Data Release of the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR1) at 148 MHz and LOFAR's first all-sky survey, the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) at 140 MHz. We find a scaling relation $P_{\rm cav} \propto L_{148}^{\beta}$, with a logarithmic slope of $\beta = 0.51 \pm 0.14$, which is in good agreement with previous results based on data at 327 MHz. The large scatter present in this correlation confirms the conclusion reached at higher frequencies that the total radio luminosity at a single frequency is a poor predictor of the total jet power. We show that including measurements at 148 MHz alone is insufficient to reliably compute the bolometric radio luminosity and reduce the scatter in the correlation. For a subset of four well-resolved sources, we examine the detected extended structures at low frequencies and compare with the morphology known from higher frequency images and Chandra X-ray maps. In Perseus we discuss details in the structures of the radio mini-halo, while in the 2A 0335+096 cluster we observe new diffuse emission associated with multiple X-ray cavities and likely originating from past activity. For A2199 and MS 0735.6+7421, we confirm that the observed low-frequency radio lobes are confined to the extents known from higher frequencies. This new low-frequency analysis highlights the fact that existing cavity power to radio luminosity relations are based on a relatively narrow range of AGN outburst ages. We discuss how the correlation could be extended using low frequency data from the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) in combination with future, complementary deeper X-ray observations.
  • We present a study of the low-frequency radio properties of star forming (SF) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) up to redshift $z=2.5$. The new spectral window probed by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) allows us to reconstruct the radio continuum emission from 150 MHz to 1.4 GHz to an unprecedented depth for a radio-selected sample of $1542$ galaxies in $\sim 7~ \rm{deg}^2$ of the LOFAR Bo\"otes field. Using the extensive multi-wavelength dataset available in Bo\"otes and detailed modelling of the FIR to UV spectral energy distribution (SED), we are able to separate the star-formation (N=758) and the AGN (N=784) dominated populations. We study the shape of the radio SEDs and their evolution across cosmic time and find significant differences in the spectral curvature between the SF galaxy and AGN populations. While the radio spectra of SF galaxies exhibit a weak but statistically significant flattening, AGN SEDs show a clear trend to become steeper towards lower frequencies. No evolution of the spectral curvature as a function of redshift is found for SF galaxies or AGN. We investigate the redshift evolution of the infrared-radio correlation (IRC) for SF galaxies and find that the ratio of total infrared to 1.4 GHz radio luminosities decreases with increasing redshift: $ q_{\rm 1.4GHz} = (2.45 \pm 0.04) \times (1+z)^{-0.15 \pm 0.03} $. Similarly, $q_{\rm 150MHz}$ shows a redshift evolution following $ q_{\rm 150GHz} = (1.72 \pm 0.04) \times (1+z)^{-0.22 \pm 0.05}$. Calibration of the 150 MHz radio luminosity as a star formation rate tracer suggests that a single power-law extrapolation from $q_{\rm 1.4GHz}$ is not an accurate approximation at all redshifts.
  • The Fermi Large Area Telescope has detected an extended region of GeV emission toward the Galactic Center that is currently thought to be powered by dark matter annihilation or a population of young and/or millisecond pulsars. In a test of the pulsar hypothesis, we have carried out an initial search of a 20 deg**2 area centered on the peak of the galactic center GeV excess. Candidate pulsars were identified as a compact, steep spectrum continuum radio source on interferometric images and followed with targeted single-dish pulsation searches. We report the discovery of the recycled pulsar PSR 1751-2737 with a spin period of 2.23 ms. PSR 1751-2737 appears to be an isolated recycled pulsar located within the disk of our Galaxy, and it is not part of the putative bulge population of pulsars that are thought to be responsible for the excess GeV emission. However, our initial success in this small pilot survey suggests that this hybrid method (i.e. wide-field interferometric imaging followed up with single dish pulsation searches) may be an efficient alternative strategy for testing whether a putative bulge population of pulsars is responsible for the GeV excess.
  • We have studied radio haloes and relics in nine merging galaxy clusters using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The images used for this study were obtained from the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) Survey which was carried out at 5 frequencies, viz. 88, 118, 154, 188 and 215 MHz. We detect diffuse radio emission in 8 of these clusters. We have estimated the spectra of haloes and relics in these clusters over the frequency range 80-1400 MHz; the first such attempt to estimate their spectra at low frequencies. The spectra follow a power law with a mean value of $\alpha = -1.13\pm0.21$ for haloes and $\alpha = -1.2\pm0.19$ for relics where, $S \propto \nu^{\alpha}$. We reclassify two of the cluster sources as radio galaxies. The low frequency spectra are thus an independent means of confirming the nature of cluster sources. Five of the nine clusters host radio haloes. For the remaining four clusters, we place upper limits on the radio powers of possible haloes in them. These upper limits are a factor of 2-20 below those expected from the $L_{\rm X}-P_{\rm 1.4}$ relation. These limits are the lowest ever obtained and the implications of these limits to the hadronic model of halo emission are discussed.
  • We present a search for transient and highly variable sources at low radio frequencies (150-200 MHz) that explores long timescales of 1-3 years. We conducted this search by comparing the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey Alternative Data Release 1 (TGSS ADR1) and the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey catalogues. To account for the different completeness thresholds in the individual surveys, we searched for compact GLEAM sources above a flux density limit of 100 mJy that were not present in the TGSS ADR1; and also for compact TGSS ADR1 sources above a flux density limit of 200 mJy that had no counterpart in GLEAM. From a total sample of 234 333 GLEAM sources and 275 612 TGSS ADR1 sources in the overlap region between the two surveys, there were 99658 GLEAM sources and 38 978 TGSS ADR sources that passed our flux density cutoff and compactness criteria. Analysis of these sources resulted in three candidate transient sources. Further analysis ruled out two candidates as imaging artefacts. We analyse the third candidate and show it is likely to be real, with a flux density of 182 +/- 26 mJy at 147.5 MHz. This gives a transient surface density of rho = (6.2 +/- 6) x 10-5 deg-2 . We present initial follow-up observations and discuss possible causes for this candidate. The small number of spurious sources from this search demonstrates the high reliability of these two new low-frequency radio catalogues.
  • Galaxy clusters undergo mergers that can generate extended radio sources called radio relics. Radio relics are the consequence of merger-induced shocks that propagate in the intra cluster medium (ICM). In this paper we analyse the radio, optical and X-ray data from a candidate galaxy cluster that has been selected from the radio emission coming from a candidate radio relic detected in NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Our aim is to clarify the nature of this source and prove that under certain conditions radio emission from radio relics can be used to trace relatively low-mass galaxy clusters. We have observed the candidate galaxy cluster with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at three different frequencies. These datasets have been analysed together with archival data from ROSAT in the X-ray and with archival data from the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) telescope in four different optical bands. We confirm the presence of a 1 Mpc long radio relic located in the outskirts of a previously unknown galaxy cluster. We confirm the presence of the galaxy cluster through dedicated optical observations and using archival X-ray data. Due to its proximity and similar redshift to a known Abell cluster, we named it: Abell 3527-bis. The galaxy cluster is among the least massive cluster known to host a radio relic. We showed that radio relics can be effectively used to trace a subset of relatively low-mass galaxy clusters that might have gone undetected in X-ray or Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys. This technique might be used in future deep, low-frequency surveys as those carried on by LOFAR, uGMRT and, ultimately, SKA.
  • Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z > 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep, but we also find ultra-steep SEDs. In particular, IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least 18% of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by the steep SEDs and the compact morphology of IFRS. The detailed multi-wavelength SED modelling of one IFRS shows that it is different from ordinary AGN, although it is consistent with a composite starburst-AGN model with a star formation rate of 170 solar masses per year.
  • We report on a search for steep spectrum radio sources within the 95% confidence error ellipses of the Fermi unassociated sources from the Large Array Telescope (LAT). Using existing catalogs and the newly released GMRT all-sky survey at 150 MHz we identify compact radio sources that are bright at MHz frequencies but faint or absent at GHz frequencies. Such steep spectrum radio sources are rare and constitute a sample of pulsar candidates, selected independently of period, dispersion measure, interstellar scattering and orbital parameters. We find point-like, steep spectrum candidates toward 11 Fermi sources. Based on the gamma-ray/radio positional coincidence, the rarity of such radio sources, and the properties of the 3FGL sources themselves, we argue that many of these sources could be pulsars. They may have been missed by previous radio periodicity searches due to interstellar propagation effects or because they lie in an unusually tight binary. If this hypothesis is correct, then renewed gamma-ray and radio periodicity searches at the positions of the steep spectrum radio sources may reveal pulsations.
  • We have used the 150 MHz radio continuum survey (TGSS ADR) from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to search for phase-averaged emission toward all well-localized radio pulsars north of -53deg Declination. We detect emission toward 200 pulsars with high confidence (>=5-sigma) and another 88 pulsars at fainter levels. We show that most of our identifications are likely from pulsars, except for a small number where the measured flux density is confused by an associated supernova or pulsar-wind nebula, or a globular cluster. We investigate the radio properties of the 150 MHz sample and we find an unusually high number of gamma-ray binary millisecond pulsars with very steep spectral indices. We also note a discrepancy in the measured flux densities between GMRT and LOFAR pulsar samples, suggesting that the flux density scale for the LOFAR pulsar sample may be in error by approximately a factor two. We carry out a separate search of 30 well-localized gamma-ray, radio-quiet pulsars in an effort to detect a widening of the radio beam into the line-of-sight at lower frequencies. No steep spectrum emission was detected either toward individual pulsars or in a weighted stack of all 30 images.
  • We present results based on X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the massive galaxy cluster CIZA J0107.7+5408. We find that this system is a post core passage, dissociative, binary merger, with the optical galaxy density peaks of each subcluster leading their associated X-ray emission peaks. This separation occurs because the diffuse gas experiences ram pressure forces while the effectively collisionless galaxies (and presumably their associated dark matter halos) do not. This system contains double peaked diffuse radio emission, possibly a double radio relic with the relics lying along the merger axis and also leading the X-ray cores. We find evidence for a temperature peak associated with the SW relic, likely created by the same merger shock that is powering the relic radio emission in this region. Thus, this system is a relatively rare clean example of a dissociative binary merger, which can in principle be used to place constraints on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter. Low frequency radio observations reveal ultra-steep spectrum diffuse radio emission that is not correlated with the X-ray, optical, or high frequency radio emission. We suggest that these sources are radio phoenixes, which are preexisting non-thermal particle populations that have been re-energized through adiabatic compression by the same merger shocks that power the radio relics. Finally, we place upper limits on inverse Compton emission from the SW radio relic.
  • With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intra cluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.
  • We present deep LOFAR observations between 120-181 MHz of the "Toothbrush" (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of $\alpha = -0.8 \pm 0.1$ at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening towards the south to $\alpha \approx - 2$. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform ($\alpha = -1.16$, with an intrinsic scatter of $\leq 0.04$). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of $\mathcal{M} = 2.8^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$, assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ($\mathcal{M} \approx 1.2$, with an upper limit of $\mathcal{M} \approx 1.5$). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.
  • LOFAR, the Low-Frequency Array, is a powerful new radio telescope operating between 10 and 240 MHz. LOFAR allows detailed sensitive high-resolution studies of the low-frequency radio sky. At the same time LOFAR also provides excellent short baseline coverage to map diffuse extended emission. However, producing high-quality deep images is challenging due to the presence of direction dependent calibration errors, caused by imperfect knowledge of the station beam shapes and the ionosphere. Furthermore, the large data volume and presence of station clock errors present additional difficulties. In this paper we present a new calibration scheme, which we name facet calibration, to obtain deep high-resolution LOFAR High Band Antenna images using the Dutch part of the array. This scheme solves and corrects the direction dependent errors in a number of facets that cover the observed field of view. Facet calibration provides close to thermal noise limited images for a typical 8 hr observing run at $\sim$ 5arcsec resolution, meeting the specifications of the LOFAR Tier-1 northern survey.