• Work belongs to the most basic notions in thermodynamics but it is not well understood in quantum systems, especially in open quantum systems. By introducing a novel concept of work functional along individual Feynman path, we invent a new approach to study thermodynamics in the quantum regime. Using the work functional, we derive a path-integral expression for the work statistics. By performing the $\hbar$ expansion, we analytically prove the quantum-classical correspondence of the work statistics. In addition, we obtain the quantum correction to the classical fluctuating work. We can also apply this approach to an open quantum system in the strong coupling regime described by the quantum Brownian motion model. This approach provides an effective way to calculate the work in open quantum systems by utilizing various path integral techniques. As an example, we calculate the work statistics for a dragged harmonic oscillator in both isolated and open quantum systems.
  • We study the heat statistics of a quantum Brownian motion described by the Caldeira-Leggett model. By using the path integral approach, we introduce a novel concept of the quantum heat functional along every pair of Feynman paths. This approach has an advantage of improving our understanding about heat in quantum systems. First, we demonstrate the microscopic reversibility of the system by connecting the heat functional to the forward and its time-reversed probabilities. Second, we analytically prove the quantum-classical correspondence of the heat functional and their statistics, which allows us to obtain better intuitions about the difference between classical and quantum heat.
  • We examine the effects of the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics in an anisotropic $XY$ spin chain, which is driven out of equilibrium by a sudden quench of the control parameter of the Hamiltonian. By analytically evaluating the statistical properties of the work distribution and the irreversible entropy production, we investigate the influences of the DM interaction on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system with different parameters at various temperatures. We find that depending on the anisotropy of the system and the temperature, the DM interaction may have different impacts on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Interestingly, the critical line induced by the DM interaction can be revealed via the properties of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In addition, our results suggest that the strength of the DM interaction can be detected experimentally by studying the nonequilibrium thermodynamics.
  • We extend the well-known static duality \cite{girardeau1960relationship, cheon1999fermion} between 1-D Bosons and 1-D Fermions to the dynamical version. By utilizing this dynamical duality we find the duality of non-equilibrium work distributions between interacting 1-D bosonic (Lieb-Liniger model) and 1-D fermionic (Cheon-Shigehara model) systems with dual contact interactions. As a special case, the work distribution of the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas is identical to that of 1-D free fermionic system even though their momentum distributions are significantly different. In the classical limit, the work distributions of Lieb-Liniger models (Cheon-Shigehara models) with arbitrary coupling strength converge to that of the 1-D noninteracting distinguishable particles, although their elemetary excitations (quasi-particles) obey different statistics, e.g. the Bose-Einstein, the Fermi-Dirac and the fractional statistics. We also present numerical results of the work distributions of Lieb-Liniger model with various coupling strengths, which demonstrate the convergence of work distributions in the classical limit.
  • Nonequilibrium processes of small systems such as molecular machines are ubiquitous in biology, chemistry and physics, but are often challenging to comprehend. In the past two decades, several exact thermodynamic relations of nonequilibrium processes, collectively known as fluctuation theorems, have been discovered and provided critical insights. These fluctuation theorems are generalizations of the second law, and can be unified by a differential fluctuation theorem. Here we perform the first experimental test of the differential fluctuation theorem, using an optically levitated nanosphere in both underdamped and overdamped regimes, and in both spatial and velocity spaces. We also test several theorems that can be obtained from it directly, including a generalized Jarzynski equality that is valid for arbitrary initial states, and the Hummer-Szabo relation. Our study experimentally verifies these fundamental theorems, and initiates the experimental study of stochastic energetics with the instantaneous velocity measurement.
  • Although nonequilibrium work and fluctuation relations have been studied in detail within classical statistical physics, extending these results to open quantum systems has proven to be conceptually difficult. For systems that undergo decoherence but not dissipation, we argue that it is natural to define quantum work exactly as for isolated quantum systems, using the two-point measurement protocol. Complementing previous theoretical analysis using quantum channels, we show that the nonequilibrium work relation remains valid in this situation, and we test this assertion experimentally using a system engineered from an optically trapped ion. Our experimental results reveal the work relation's validity over a variety of driving speeds, decoherence rates, and effective temperatures and represent the first confirmation of the work relation for non-unitary dynamics.
  • In conventional thermodynamics, it is widely acknowledged that the realization of an isothermal process for a system requires a quasi-static controlling protocol. Here we propose and design a strategy to realize a finite-rate isothermal transition from an equilibrium state to another one with same temperature, which is named shortcut to isothermality~(STI). By using STI, we unexpectedly derive three nonequilibrium work relations, including an identity between the free energy difference and the mean work due to the potential of the original system, a generalized Jarzynski equality, and the inverse relationship between the irreversible work and the total driving time. We numerically confirm these three relations by considering the motion of a Brownian particle trapped in a harmonic potential and dragged by a time-dependent force.
  • In this article, we introduce two kinds of Fluctuation Theorems (FT) containing information for autonomous Maxwell's demon-assisted machines. Using Jensen's Inequality, we obtain Landauer's principle formulation of the second law for the whole process of the machine. Finally we make use of our results to analyze a new information device. \pacs{05.70.Ln, 05.40.-a, 89.70.Cf}
  • Based on previous studies in a single particle system in both the integrable [Jarzynski, Quan, and Rahav, Phys.~Rev.~X {\bf 5}, 031038 (2015)] and the chaotic systems [Zhu, Gong, Wu, and Quan, Phys.~Rev.~E {\bf 93}, 062108 (2016)], we study the the correspondence principle between quantum and classical work distributions in a quantum many-body system. Even though the interaction and the indistinguishability of identical particles increase the complexity of the system, we find that for a quantum many-body system the cumulative quantum work distribution still converges to its classical counterpart in the semiclassical limit. Our results imply that there exists a correspondence principle between quantum and classical work distributions in an interacting quantum many-body system, especially in the large particle number limit, and further justify the definition of quantum work via two point energy measurements in quantum many-body systems.
  • The piston system (particles in a box) is the simplest and paradigmatic model in traditional thermodynamics. However, the recently established framework of stochastic thermodynamics (ST) fails to apply to this model system due to the embedded singularity in the potential. In this Letter we study the stochastic thermodynamics of a particle in a box by adopting a novel coordinate transformation technique. Through comparing with the exact solution of a breathing harmonic oscillator, we obtain analytical results of work distribution for an arbitrary protocol in the linear response regime, and verify various predictions of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Relation. When applying to the Brownian Szilard's engine model, we obtain the optimal protocol $\lambda_t = \lambda_0 2^{t/\tau}$ for a given sufficiently long total time $\tau$. Our study not only establishes a paradigm for studying ST of a particle in a box, but also bridges the long-standing gap in the development of ST.
  • For closed quantum systems driven away from equilibrium, work is often defined in terms of projective measurements of initial and final energies. This definition leads to statistical distributions of work that satisfy nonequilibrium work and fluctuation relations. While this two-point measurement definition of quantum work can be justified heuristically by appeal to the first law of thermodynamics, its relationship to the classical definition of work has not been carefully examined. In this paper we employ semiclassical methods, combined with numerical simulations of a driven quartic oscillator, to study the correspondence between classical and quantal definitions of work in systems with one degree of freedom. We find that a semiclassical work distribution, built from classical trajectories that connect the initial and final energies, provides an excellent approximation to the quantum work distribution when the trajectories are assigned suitable phases and are allowed to interfere. Neglecting the interferences between trajectories reduces the distribution to that of the corresponding classical process. Hence, in the semiclassical limit, the quantum work distribution converges to the classical distribution, decorated by a quantum interference pattern. We also derive the form of the quantum work distribution at the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, where this distribution tunnels into the forbidden region. Our results clarify how the correspondence principle applies in the context of quantum and classical work distributions, and contribute to the understanding of work and nonequilibrium work relations in the quantum regime.
  • By taking full advantage of the dynamic property imposed by the detailed balance condition, we derive a new refined unified fluctuation theorem (FT) for general stochastic thermodynamic systems. This FT involves the joint probability distribution functions of the final phase space point and a thermodynamic variable. Jarzynski equality, Crooks fluctuation theorem, and the FTs of heat as well as the trajectory entropy production can be regarded as special cases of this refined unified FT, and all of them are generalized to arbitrary initial distributions. We also find that the refined unified FT can easily reproduce the FTs for processes with the feedback control, due to its unconventional structure that separates the thermodynamic variable from the choices of initial distributions. Our result is heuristic for further understanding of the relations and distinctions between all kinds of FTs, and might be valuable for studying thermodynamic processes with information exchange.
  • Quantum mechanical particles in a confining potential interfere with each other while undergoing thermodynamic processes far from thermal equilibrium. By evaluating the corresponding transition probabilities between many-particle eigenstates we obtain the quantum work distribution function, for identical Bosons and Fermions, which we compare with the case of distinguishable particles. We find that the quantum work distributions for Bosons and Fermions significantly differ at low temperatures, while, as expected, at high temperatures the work distributions converge to the classical expression. These findings are illustrated with two analytically solvable examples, namely the time-dependent infinite square well and the parametric harmonic oscillator.
  • The past two decades witnessed important developments in the field of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Among these developments, the Jarzynski equality, being a milestone following the landmark work of Clausius and Kelvin, stands out. The Jarzynski equality relates the free energy difference between two equilibrium states and the work done on the system through far from equilibrium processes. While experimental tests of the equality have been performed in classical regime, the verification of the quantum Jarzynski equality has not yet been fully demonstrated due to experimental challenges. Here, we report an experimental test of the quantum Jarzynski equality with a single \Yb ion trapped in a harmonic potential. We perform projective measurements to obtain phonon distributions of the initial thermal state. Following that we apply the laser induced force on the projected energy eigenstate, and find transition probabilities to final energy eigenstates after the work is done. By varying the speed of applying the force from equilibrium to far-from equilibrium regime, we verified the quantum Jarzynski equality in an isolated system.
  • We study the maximum efficiency of a Carnot cycle heat engine based on a small system. It is revealed that due to the finiteness of the system, irreversibility may arise when the working substance contacts with a heat bath. As a result, there is a working-substance-dependent correction to the usual Carnot efficiency, which is valid only when the working substance is in the thermodynamic limit. We derives a general and simple expression for the maximum efficiency of a Carnot cycle heat engine in terms of the relative entropy. This maximum efficiency approaches the usual Carnot efficiency asymptotically when the size of the working substance increases to the thermodynamic limit. Our study extends the Carnot's result to cases with arbitrary size working substance and demonstrates the subtlety of thermodynamics in small systems.
  • We describe a simple and solvable model of a device that -- like the "neat-fingered being" in Maxwell's famous thought experiment -- transfers energy from a cold system to a hot system by rectifying thermal fluctuations. In order to accomplish this task, our device requires a memory register to which it can write information: the increase in the Shannon entropy of the memory compensates the decrease in the thermodynamic entropy arising from the flow of heat against a thermal gradient. We construct the nonequilibrium phase diagram for this device, and find that it can alternatively act as an eraser of information. We discuss our model in the context of the second law of thermodynamics.
  • This is a reply to the comment from Patrick Bruno (arXiv:1211.4792) on our paper (Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 163001 (2012)).
  • Spontaneous symmetry breaking can lead to the formation of time crystals, as well as spatial crystals. Here we propose a space-time crystal of trapped ions and a method to realize it experimentally by confining ions in a ring-shaped trapping potential with a static magnetic field. The ions spontaneously form a spatial ring crystal due to Coulomb repulsion. This ion crystal can rotate persistently at the lowest quantum energy state in magnetic fields with fractional fluxes. The persistent rotation of trapped ions produces the temporal order, leading to the formation of a space-time crystal. We show that these space-time crystals are robust for direct experimental observation. We also study the effects of finite temperatures on the persistent rotation. The proposed space-time crystals of trapped ions provide a new dimension for exploring many-body physics and emerging properties of matter.
  • Recent work by Teifel and Mahler [Eur. Phys. J. B 75, 275 (2010)] raises legitimate concerns regarding the validity of quantum nonequilibrium work relations in processes involving moving hard walls. We study this issue in the context of the rapidly expanding one-dimensional quantum piston. Utilizing exact solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, we find that the evolution of the wave function can be decomposed into static and dynamic components, which have simple semiclassical interpretations in terms of particle-piston collisions. We show that nonequilibrium work relations remains valid at any finite piston speed, provided both components are included, and we study explicitly the work distribution for this model system.
  • We study decoherence induced by a dynamic environment undergoing a quantum phase transition. Environment's susceptibility to perturbations - and, consequently, efficiency of decoherence - is amplified near a critical point. Over and above this near-critical susceptibility increase, we show that decoherence is dramatically enhanced by non-equilibrium critical dynamics of the environment. We derive a simple expression relating decoherence to the universal critical exponents exhibiting deep connections with the theory of topological defect creation in non-equilibrium phase transitions.
  • The radical-pair-based chemical reaction could be used by birds for the navigation via the geomagnetic direction. An inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could response to the weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field and then results in different photopigments in the avian eyes to be sensed. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup for the ultra-sensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via the recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the weak magnetic field.
  • Based on a microscopic model, we study the interplay between superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in a multi-layered system, where two superconductors are separated by an antiferromagnetic region. Within a self-consistent mean-field theory, this system is solved numerically. We find that the antiferromagnetism in the middle layers profoundly affects the supercurrent flowing across the junction, while the phase difference across the junction influences the development of antiferromagnetism in the middle layers. This study may not only shed new light on the mechanism for high-$T_{c}$ superconductors, but also bring important insights to building Josephson-junction-based quantum devices, such as SQUID and superconducting qubit.
  • Adiabaticity of quantum evolution is important in many settings. One example is the adiabatic quantum computation. Nevertheless, up to now, there is no effective method to test the adiabaticity of the evolution when the eigenenergies of the driven Hamiltonian are not known. We propose a simple method to check adiabaticity of a quantum process for an arbitrary quantum system. We further propose a operational method for finding a uniformly adiabatic quench scheme based on Kibble-Zurek mechanism for the case when the initial and the final Hamiltonians are given. This method should help in implementing adiabatic quantum computation.
  • Quantum Darwinism provides an information-theoretic framework for the emergence of the objective, classical world from the quantum substrate. The key to this emergence is the proliferation of redundant information throughout the environment where observers can then intercept it. We study this process for a purely decohering interaction when the environment, E, is in a non-ideal (e.g., mixed) initial state. In the case of good decoherence, that is, after the pointer states have been unambiguously selected, the mutual information between the system, S, and an environment fragment, F, is given solely by F's entropy increase. This demonstrates that the environment's capacity for recording the state of S is directly related to its ability to increase its entropy. Environments that remain nearly invariant under the interaction with S, either because they have a large initial entropy or a misaligned initial state, therefore have a diminished ability to acquire information. To elucidate the concept of good decoherence, we show that - when decoherence is not complete - the deviation of the mutual information from F's entropy change is quantified by the quantum discord, i.e., the excess mutual information between S and F is information regarding the initial coherence between pointer states of S. In addition to illustrating these results with a single qubit system interacting with a multi-qubit environment, we find scaling relations for the redundancy of information acquired by the environment that display a universal behavior independent of the initial state of S. Our results demonstrate that Quantum Darwinism is robust with respect to non-ideal initial states of the environment: the environment almost always acquires redundant information about the system but its rate of acquisition can be reduced.
  • Quantum Darwinism recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the "systems of interest" indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Here, we show that information about a system can be acquired from a mixed-state, or hazy, environment, but the storage capacity of an environment fragment is suppressed by its initial entropy. In the case of good decoherence, the mutual information between the system and the fragment is given solely by the fragment's entropy increase. For fairly mixed environments, this means a reduction by a factor 1-h, where h is the haziness of the environment, i.e., the initial entropy of an environment qubit. Thus, even such hazy environments eventually reveal the state of the system, although now the intercepted environment fragment must be larger by ~1/(1-h) to gain the same information about the system.