• Even after elaborate investigations for 30 years, we still do not know well how the progenitor of SN 1987A has evolved. To explain unusual red-to-blue evolution, previous studies suggest that in a red giant stage either the increase of surface He abundance or the envelope mass was necessary. It is usually supposed that the He enhancement is caused by the rotational mixing, and the mass increase is by a binary merger. Thus, we have investigated these scenarios thoroughly. The obtained findings are that rotating single star models do not satisfy all the observational constraints and that the enhancement of envelope mass alone does not explain observations. Here, we consider a slow merger scenario in which both the He abundance and the envelope mass enhancements are expected to occur. We indeed show that most observational constraints such as the red-to-blue evolution, lifetime, total mass, position in the HR diagram at collapse, and the chemical anomalies are well reproduced by the merger model of 14 and 9 M$_{\odot}$ stars. We also discuss the effects of the added envelope spin in the merger scenarios.
  • We present recent advances in theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of dust in primordial supernovae (SNe) that are considered to be the main sources of dust in the early universe. Being combined with the results of calculations of dust formation in the ejecta of Population III SNe, the investigations of the evolution of newly formed dust within supernova remnants (SNRs) show that smaller grains are predominantly destroyed by sputtering in the shocked gas, while larger grains are injected into the ambient medium. The mass of dust grains surviving the destruction in SNRs reaches up to 0.1--15 $M_\odot$, which is high enough to account for the content of dust observed for the host galaxies of quasars at $z > 5$. In addition, the transport of dust formed in the ejecta causes the formation of low-mass stars in the dense shell of primordial SNRs and affects the elemental composition of those stars. We also show that the flat extinction curve is expected in the high-redshift universe where SNe are the possible sources of dust.
  • Several short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) were present in the early solar system, some of which should have formed just prior to or soon after the solar system formation. Stellar nucleosynthesis has been proposed as the mechanism for production of SLRs in the solar system, but no appropriate stellar source has been found to explain the abundances of all solar system SLRs. In this study, we propose a faint supernova with mixing and fallback as a stellar source of SLRs with mean lives of <5 Myr (26Al, 41Ca, 53Mn, and 60Fe) in the solar system. In such a supernova, the inner region of the exploding star experiences mixing, a small fraction of mixed materials is ejected, and the rest undergoes fallback onto the core. The modeled SLR abundances agree well with their solar system abundances if mixing-fallback occurs within the C/O-burning layer. In some cases, the initial solar system abundances of the SLRs can be reproduced within a factor of 2. The dilution factor of supernova ejecta to the solar system materials is ~10E-4 and the time interval between the supernova explosion and the formation of oldest solid materials in the solar system is ~1 Myr. If the dilution occurred due to spherically symmetric expansion, a faint supernova should have occurred nearby the solar system forming region in a star cluster.
  • SN 2006jc is a peculiar supernova (SN), in which the formation of dust has been confirmed at an early epoch of ~50 days after the explosion. We investigate the possibility of such an earlier formation of dust grains in the expanding ejecta of SN 2006jc, applying the Type Ib SN model that is developed to reproduce the observed light curve. We find that the rapid decrease of the gas temperature in SN 2006jc enables the condensation of C grains in the C-rich layer at 40-60 days after the explosion, which is followed by the condensation of silicate and oxide grains until ~200 days. The average radius of each grain species is confined to be less than 0.01 micron due to the low gas density at the condensation time. The calculated total dust mass reaches ~1.5 Msun, of which C dust shares 0.7 Msun. On the other hand, based on the calculated dust temperature, we show that the dust species and mass evaluated to reproduce the spectral energy distribution observed by AKARI and MAGNUM at day 200 are different from those obtained by the dust formation calculations; the dust species contributing to the observed flux are hot C and FeS grains with masses of $5.6 \times 10^{-4}$ Msun and $2.0 \times 10^{-3}$ Msun, respectively, though we cannot defy the presence of a large amount of cold dust such as silicate and oxide grains up to 0.5 Msun. One of the physical processes responsible for the difference between calculated and evaluated masses of C and FeS grains could be considered to be the destruction of small-sized clusters by energetic photons and electrons prevailing within the ejecta at the earlier epoch.
  • The connection between the long GRBs and Type Ic Supernovae (SNe) has revealed the interesting diversity: (i) GRB-SNe, (ii) Non-GRB Hypernovae (HNe), (iii) X-Ray Flash (XRF)-SNe, and (iv) Non-SN GRBs (or dark HNe). We show that nucleosynthetic properties found in the above diversity are connected to the variation of the abundance patterns of extremely-metal-poor (EMP) stars, such as the excess of C, Co, Zn relative to Fe. We explain such a connection in a unified manner as nucleosynthesis of hyper-aspherical (jet-induced) explosions Pop III core-collapse SNe. We show that (1) the explosions with large energy deposition rate, $\dot{E}_{\rm dep}$, are observed as GRB-HNe and their yields can explain the abundances of normal EMP stars, and (2) the explosions with small $\dot{E}_{\rm dep}$ are observed as GRBs without bright SNe and can be responsible for the formation of the C-rich EMP (CEMP) and the hyper metal-poor (HMP) stars. We thus propose that GRB-HNe and the Non-SN GRBs (dark HNe) belong to a continuous series of BH-forming stellar deaths with the relativistic jets of different $\dot{E}_{\rm dep}$.
  • We present our latest results on near- to mid- infrared observation of SN2006jc at 200 days after the discovery using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board $AKARI$. The near-infrared (2--5$\mu$m) spectrum of SN2006jc is obtained for the first time and is found to be well interpreted in terms of the thermal emission from amorphous carbon of 800$\pm 10$K with the mass of $6.9\pm 0.5 \times 10^{-5}M_{\odot}$ that was formed in the supernova ejecta. This dust mass newly formed in the ejecta of SN 2006jc is in a range similar to those obtained for other several dust forming core collapse supernovae based on recent observations (i.e., $10^{-3}$--$10^{-5}$$M_{\odot}$). Mid-infrared photometric data with {\it{AKARI}}/IRC MIR-S/S7, S9W, and S11 bands have shown excess emission over the thermal emission by hot amorphous carbon of 800K. This mid-infrared excess emission is likely to be accounted for by the emission from warm amorphous carbon dust of 320$\pm 10$K with the mass of 2.7$^{+0.7}_{-0.5} \times 10^{-3}M_{\odot}$ rather than by the band emission of astronomical silicate and/or silica grains. This warm amorphous carbon dust is expected to have been formed in the mass loss wind associated with the Wolf-Rayet stellar activity before the SN explosion. Our result suggests that a significant amount of dust is condensed in the mass loss wind prior to the SN explosion. A possible contribution of emission bands by precursory SiO molecules in 7.5--9.5$\mu$m is also suggested.
  • We review the nucleosynthesis yields of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) for various stellar masses, explosion energies, and metallicities. Comparison with the abundance patterns of metal-poor stars provides excellent opportunities to test the explosion models and their nucleosynthesis. We show that the abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, e.g., the excess of C, Co, Zn relative to Fe, are in better agreement with the yields of hyper-energetic explosions (Hypernovae, HNe) rather than normal supernovae. We note that the variation of the abundance patterns of EMP stars are related to the diversity of the Supernova-GRB connection. We summarize the diverse properties of (1) GRB-SNe, (2) Non-GRB HNe/SNe, (3) XRF-SN, and (4) Non-SN GRB. In particular, the Non-SN GRBs (dark hypernovae) have been predicted in order to explain the origin of C-rich EMP stars. We show that these variations and the connection can be modeled in a unified manner with the explosions induced by relativistic jets. Finally, we examine whether the most luminous supernova 2006gy can be consistently explained with the pair-instability supernova model.
  • Late phase nebular spectra and photometry of Type Ib Supernova (SN) 2005bf taken by the Subaru telescope at ~ 270 and ~ 310 days since the explosion are presented. Emission lines ([OI]6300, 6363, [CaII]7291, 7324, [FeII]7155) show the blueshift of ~ 1,500 - 2,000 km s-1. The [OI] doublet shows a doubly-peaked profile. The line luminosities can be interpreted as coming from a blob or jet containing only ~ 0.1 - 0.4 Msun, in which ~ 0.02 - 0.06 Msun is 56Ni synthesized at the explosion. To explain the blueshift, the blob should either be of unipolar moving at the center-of-mass velocity v ~ 2,000 - 5,000 km s-1, or suffer from self-absorption within the ejecta as seen in SN 1990I. In both interpretations, the low-mass blob component dominates the optical output both at the first peak (~ 20 days) and at the late phase (~ 300 days). The low luminosity at the late phase (the absolute R magnitude M_R ~ -10.2 mag at ~ 270 days) sets the upper limit for the mass of 56Ni < ~ 0.08 Msun, which is in contradiction to the value necessary to explain the second, main peak luminosity (M_R ~ -18.3 mag at ~ 40 days). Encountered by this difficulty in the 56Ni heating model, we suggest an alternative scenario in which the heating source is a newly born, strongly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar) with the surface magnetic field Bmag ~ 10^{14-15} gauss and the initial spin period P0 ~ 10 ms. Then, SN 2005bf could be a link between normal SNe Ib/c and an X-Ray Flash associated SN 2006aj, connected in terms of Bmag and/or P0.
  • We calculate the evolution of heavy element abundances from C to Zn in the solar neighborhood adopting our new nucleosynthesis yields. Our yields are calculated for wide ranges of metallicity (Z=0-Z_\odot) and the explosion energy (normal supernovae and hypernovae), based on the light curve and spectra fitting of individual supernovae. The elemental abundance ratios are in good agreement with observations. Among the alpha-elements, O, Mg, Si, S, and Ca show a plateau at [Fe/H] < -1, while Ti is underabundant overall. The observed abundance of Zn ([Zn/Fe] ~ 0) can be explained only by the high energy explosion models, which requires a large contribution of hypernovae. The observed decrease in the odd-Z elements (Na, Al, and Cu) toward low [Fe/H] is reproduced by the metallicity effect on nucleosynthesis. The iron-peak elements (Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni) are consistent with the observed mean values at -2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1$, and the observed trend at the lower metallicity can be explained by the energy effect. We also show the abundance ratios and the metallicity distribution functions of the Galactic bulge, halo, and thick disk. Our results suggest that the formation timescale of the thick disk is ~ 1-3 Gyr.
  • We calculate evolution, collapse, explosion, and nucleosynthesis of Population III very-massive stars with 500$M_{\odot}$ and 1000$M_{\odot}$. Presupernova evolution is calculated in spherical symmetry. Collapse and explosion are calculated by a two-dimensional code, based on the bipolar jet models. We compare the results of nucleosynthesis with the abundance patterns of intracluster matter, hot gases in M82, and extremely metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo. It was found that both 500$M_{\odot}$ and 1000$M_{\odot}$ models enter the region of pair-instability but continue to undergo core collapse. In the presupernova stage, silicon burning regions occupy a large fraction, more than 20% of the total mass. For moderately aspherical explosions, the patterns of nucleosynthesis match the observational data of both intracluster medium and M82. Our results suggest that explosions of Population III core-collapse very-massive stars contribute significantly to the chemical evolution of gases in clusters of galaxies. For Galactic halo stars, our [O/Fe] ratios are smaller than the observational abundances. However, our proposed scenario is naturally consistent with this outcome. The final black hole masses are $\sim 230M_{\odot}$ and $\sim 500M_{\odot}$ for the $500M_{\odot}$ and 1000$M_{\odot}$ models, respectively. This result may support the view that Population III very massive stars are responsible for the origin of intermediate mass black holes which were recently reported to be discovered.
  • Observations and modeling for the light curve (LC) and spectra of supernova (SN) 2005bf are reported. This SN showed unique features: the LC had two maxima, and declined rapidly after the second maximum, while the spectra showed strengthening He lines whose velocity increased with time. The double-peaked LC can be reproduced by a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, with most $^{56}$Ni at low velocity and a small amount at high velocity. The rapid post-maximum decline requires a large fraction of the $\gamma$-rays to escape from the $^{56}$Ni-dominated region, possibly because of low-density ``holes''. The presence of Balmer lines in the spectrum suggests that the He layer of the progenitor was substantially intact. Increasing $\gamma$-ray deposition in the He layer due to enhanced $\gamma$-ray escape from the $^{56}$Ni-dominated region may explain both the delayed strengthening and the increasing velocity of the He lines. The SN has massive ejecta ($\sim6-7\Msun$), normal kinetic energy ($\sim 1.0-1.5\times 10^{51}$ ergs), high peak bolometric luminosity ($\sim 5\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$) for an epoch as late as $\sim$ 40 days, and a large $^{56}$Ni mass ($\sim0.32\Msun$). These properties, and the presence of a small amount of H suggest that the progenitor was initially massive (M$\sim 25-30 \Msun$) and had lost most of its H envelope, and was possibly a WN star. The double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution suggests that the explosion may have formed jets that did not reach the He layer. The properties of SN 2005bf resemble those of the explosion of Cassiopeia A.
  • Recent studies of core-collapse supernovae have revealed the existence of two distinct classes of massive supernovae (SNe): 1) very energetic SNe (Hypernovae), whose kinetic energy (KE) exceeds $10^{52}$ erg, about 10 times the KE of normal core-collapse SNe, and 2) very faint and low energy SNe (E < 0.5 $\times$ $10^{51}$ erg; Faint supernovae). These two classes of supernovae are likely to be "black-hole-forming" supernovae with rotating or non-rotating black holes. We compare their nucleosynthesis yields with the abundances of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars to identify the Pop III (or first) supernovae. We show that the EMP stars, especially the C-rich type, are likely to be enriched by black-hole-forming supernovae.
  • During the last few years, a number of exceptional core-collapse supernovae (SNe) have been discovered. Their kinetic energy of the explosions are larger by more than an order of magnitude than the typical values for this type of SNe, so that these SNe have been called `Hypernovae'. We first describe how the basic properties of hypernovae can be derived from observations and modeling. These hypernovae seem to come from rather massive stars, thus forming black holes. On the other hand, there are some examples of massive SNe with only a small kinetic energy. We suggest that stars with non-rotating black holes are likely to collapse "quietly" ejecting a small amount of heavy elements (Faint supernovae). In contrast, stars with rotating black holes are likely to give rise to very energetic supernovae (Hypernovae). We present distinct nucleosynthesis features of these two types of "black-hole-forming" supernovae. Hypernova nucleosynthesis is characterized by larger abundance ratios (Zn,Co,V,Ti)/Fe and smaller (Mn,Cr)/Fe. Nucleosynthesis in Faint supernovae is characterized by a large amount of fall-back. We show that the abundance pattern of the most Fe deficient star, HE0107-5240, and other extremely metal-poor carbon-rich stars are in good accord with those of black-hole-forming supernovae, but not pair-instability supernovae. This suggests that black-hole-forming supernovae made important contributions to the early Galactic (and cosmic) chemical evolution.
  • A key question for supernova cosmology is whether the peak luminosities of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are sufficiently free from the effects of cosmic and galactic evolution. To answer this question, we review the currently popular scenario of SN Ia progenitors, i.e., the single degenerate scenario for the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models. We identify the progenitor's evolution with two channels: (1) the WD+RG (red-giant) and (2) the WD+MS (near main-sequence He-rich star) channels. The strong wind from accreting WDs plays a key role, which yields important age and metallicity effects on the evolution. We suggest that the variation of the carbon mass fraction $X$(C) in the C+O WD (or the variation of the initial WD mass) causes the diversity of SN Ia brightness. This model can explain the observed dependence of SNe Ia brightness on the galaxy types. We then predict how SN Ia brightness evolves along the redshift (with changing metallicity and age) for elliptical and spiral galaxies. Such evolutionary effects along the redshift can be corrected as has been made for local SNe Ia. We also touch on several related issues: (1) the abundance pattern of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies in relation to the metallicity effect on SNe Ia, (2) effects of angular momentum brought into the WD in relation to the diversities and the fate of double degenerates, and (3) possible presence of helium in the peculiar SN Ia 2000cx in relation to the sub-Chandrasekhar mass model.
  • Spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations of SN 2003dh/GRB 030329 obtained in 2003 May using the Subaru 8.2 m telescope are presented. The properties of the SN are investigated through a comparison with spectra of the Type Ic hypernovae SNe 1997ef and 1998bw. (Hypernovae being a tentatively defined class of SNe with very broad absorption features: these features suggest a large velocity of the ejected material and possibly a large explosion kinetic energy.) Comparison with spectra of other hypernovae shows that the spectrum of SN 2003dh obtained on 2003 May 8 and 9, i.e., 34-35 rest-frame days after the GRB (for z=0.1685), are similar to those of SN 1997ef obtained ~34-42 days after the fiducial time of explosion of that SN. The match with SN 1998bw spectra is not as good (at rest 7300-8000 A, but again spectra obtained ~33-43 days after GRB 980425 are preferred. This indicates that the SN may have intermediate properties between SNe 1997ef and 1998bw. Based on the analogy with the other hypernovae, the time of explosion of SN 2003dh is then constrained to be between -8 and +2 days of the GRB. The Si and O P-Cygni lines of SN 2003dh seem comparable to those of SN 1997ef, which suggests that the ejected mass in SN 2003dh may match that in SN 1997ef. Polarization was marginally detected at optical wavelengths. This is consistent with measurements of the late afterglow, implying that it mostly originated in the interstellar medium of the host galaxy.
  • Stars more massive than $\sim$ 20 - 25 \ms form a black hole at the end of their evolution. Stars with non-rotating black holes are likely to collapse "quietly" ejecting a small amount of heavy elements (Faint supernovae). In contrast, stars with rotating black holes are likely to give rise to very energetic supernovae (Hypernovae). We present distinct nucleosynthesis features of these two types of "black-hole-forming" supernovae. Nucleosynthesis in Hypernovae is characterized by larger abundance ratios (Zn,Co,V,Ti)/Fe and smaller (Mn,Cr)/Fe than normal supernovae, which can explain the observed trend of these ratios in extremely metal-poor stars. Nucleosynthesis in Faint supernovae is characterized by a large amount of fall-back. We show that the abundance pattern of the recently discovered most Fe-poor star, HE0107-5240, and other extremely metal-poor carbon-rich stars are in good accord with those of black-hole-forming supernovae, but not pair-instability supernovae. This suggests that black-hole-forming supernovae made important contributions to the early Galactic (and cosmic) chemical evolution. Finally we discuss the nature of First (Pop III) Stars.
  • Supernova (SN) 2002ap in M74 was observed in the $UBVRIJHK$ bands for the first 40 days following its discovery (2002 January 29) until it disappeared because of solar conjunction, and then in June after it reappeared. The magnitudes and dates of peak brightness in each band were determined. While the rate of increase of the brightness before the peak is almost independent of wavelength, the subsequent rate of decrease becomes smaller with wavelength from the $U$ to the $R$ band, and is constant at wavelengths beyond $I$. The photometric evolution is faster than in the well-known ``hypernovae'' SNe~1998bw and 1997ef, indicating that SN 2002ap ejected less mass. The bolometric light curve of SN 2002ap for the full period of observations was constructed. The absolute magnitude is found to be much fainter than that of SN 1998bw, but is similar to that of SN 1997ef, which lies at the faint end of the hypernova population. The bolometric light curve at the early epochs was best reproduced with the explosion of a C+O star that ejects $2.5~M_\sun$ with kinetic energy $E_{\rm K}=4\times 10^{51}~{\rm ergs}$. A comparison of the predicted brightness of SN 2002ap with that observed after solar conjunction may imply that $\gamma$-ray deposition at the later epochs was more efficient than in the model. This may be due to an asymmetric explosion.
  • Photometric and spectroscopic data of the energetic Type Ic supernova (SN) 2002ap are presented, and the properties of the SN are investigated through models of its spectral evolution and its light curve. The SN is spectroscopically similar to the "hypernova" SN 1997ef. However, its kinetic energy [$\sim (4-10) \times 10^{51}$ erg] and the mass ejected (2.5-5 $M_{\odot}$) are smaller, resulting in a faster-evolving light curve. The SN synthesized $\sim 0.07 M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni, and its peak luminosity was similar to that of normal SNe. Brightness alone should not be used to define a hypernova, whose defining character, namely very broad spectral features, is the result of a high kinetic energy. The likely main-sequence mass of the progenitor star was 20-25 $M_{\odot}$, which is also lower than that of both hypernovae SNe 1997ef and 1998bw. SN 2002ap appears to lie at the low-energy and low-mass end of the hypernova sequence as it is known so far. Observations of the nebular spectrum, which is expected to dominate by summer 2002, are necessary to confirm these values.
  • We review the characteristics of nucleosynthesis and radioactivities in 'Hypernovae', i.e., supernovae with very large explosion energies ($ \gsim 10^{52} $ ergs) and their $\gamma$-ray line signatures. We also discuss the $^{44}$Ti line $\gamma$-rays from SN1987A and the detectability with INTEGRAL. Signatures of hypernova nucleosynthesis are seen in the large [(Ti, Zn)/Fe] ratios in very metal poor stars. Radioactivities in hypernovae compared to those of ordinary core-collapse supernovae show the following characteristics: 1) The complete Si burning region is more extended, so that the ejected mass of $^{56}$Ni can be much larger. 2) Si-burning takes place in higher entropy and more $\alpha$-rich environment. Thus the $^{44}$Ti abundance relative to $^{56}$Ni is much larger. In aspherical explosions, $^{44}$Ti is even more abundant and ejected with velocities as high as $\sim$ 15,000 km s$^{-1}$, which could be observed in $\gamma$-ray line profiles. 3) The abundance of $^{26}$Al is not so sensitive to the explosion energy, while the $^{60}$Fe abundance is enhanced by a factor of $\sim$ 3.
  • We study nucleosynthesis in 'hypernovae', i.e., supernovae with very large explosion energies ($ \gsim 10^{52} $ ergs) for both spherical and aspherical explosions. The hypernova yields compared to those of ordinary core-collapse supernovae show the following characteristics: 1) Complete Si-burning takes place in more extended region, so that the mass ratio between the complete and incomplete Si burning regions is generally larger in hypernovae than normal supernovae. As a result, higher energy explosions tend to produce larger [(Zn, Co)/Fe], small [(Mn, Cr)/Fe], and larger [Fe/O], which could explain the trend observed in very metal-poor stars. 2) Si-burning takes place in lower density regions, so that the effects of $\alpha$-rich freezeout is enhanced. Thus $^{44}$Ca, $^{48}$Ti, and $^{64}$Zn are produced more abundantly than in normal supernovae. The large [(Ti, Zn)/Fe] ratios observed in very metal poor stars strongly suggest a significant contribution of hypernovae. 3) Oxygen burning also takes place in more extended regions for the larger explosion energy. Then a larger amount of Si, S, Ar, and Ca ("Si") are synthesized, which makes the "Si"/O ratio larger. The abundance pattern of the starburst galaxy M82 may be attributed to hypernova explosions. Asphericity in the explosions strengthens the nucleosynthesis properties of hypernovae except for "Si"/O. We thus suggest that hypernovae make important contribution to the early Galactic (and cosmic) chemical evolution.
  • The influence of the metallicity at the main sequence on the chemical structure of the exploding white dwarf, the nucleosynthesis during the explosion and the light curves of an individual Type Ia supernovae have been studied. Detailed calculations of the stellar evolution, the explosion, and light curves of delayed detonation models are presented. Detailed stellar evolution calculations with a main sequence mass of 7 M_o have been performed to test the influence of the metallicity Z on the structure of the progenitor. A change of Z influences the central helium burning and, consequently, the size of the C/O core which becomes a C/O white dwarf and its C/O ratio. Subsequently, the white dwarf may grow to the Chandrasekhar mass and explode as a Type Ia supernovae. Consequently, the C/O structure of the exploding white dwarf depends on Z. Since C and O are the fuel for the thermonuclear explosion, Z indirectly changes the energetics of the explosion. In our example, changing Z from Pop I to Pop II causes a change in the zero point of the maximum brightness/decline relation by about $0.1^m$ and a change in the rise time by about 1 day. Combined with previous studies, We provide a relation between a change of the rise time in SNeIa and the off-set in the brightness/decline relation. We find that dM = dt where dM is the offset in the relation and dt is the change of the rise time in days. This relation provides a way to detect and test for evolutionary effects, and to estimate the possible consequences for the determination of the cosmological constant. However, due to uncertainties in the time evolution of the properties of the progenitors, we cannot predict whether evolution becomes important at z=0.5, 1 or 2. This question has to be answered by observations.
  • Observations suggest that the properties of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) may depend on environmental characteristics, such as morphology, metallicity, and age of host galaxies. The influence of these environmental properties on the resulting SNe Ia is studied in this paper. First it is shown that the carbon mass fraction X(C) in the C+O white dwarf SN Ia progenitors tends to be smaller for lower metallicity and older the binary system age. It is then suggested that the variation of X(C) causes the diversity in the brightness of SNe Ia: a smaller X(C) leads to a dimmer SN Ia. Further studies of the propagation of the turbulent flame are necessary to confirm this relation. Our model for the SN Ia progenitors then predicts that when the progenitors belong to an older population or to a low metallicity environment, the number of bright SNe Ia is reduced, so that the variation in brightness among the SNe Ia is also smaller. Thus our model can explain why the mean SN Ia brightness and its dispersion depend on the morphology of the host galaxies and on the distance of the SN from the center of the galaxy. It is further predicted that at higher redshift (z >~ 1) both the the mean brightness of SNe Ia and its variation should be smaller in spiral galaxies than in elliptical galaxies. These variations are within the range observed in nearby SNe Ia. In so far as the variation in X(C) is the most important cause for the diversity among SNe Ia, the light curve shape method currently used to determine the absolute magnitude of SNe Ia can be applied also to high redshift SNe Ia.
  • The discovery of X-ray, optical and radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the measurements of the distances to some of them have established that these events come from Gpc distances and are the most powerful photon emitters known in the Universe, with peak luminosities up to 10^52 erg/s. We here report the discovery of an optical transient, in the BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera error box of GRB980425, which occurred within about a day of the gamma-ray burst. Its optical light curve, spectrum and location in a spiral arm of the galaxy ESO 184-G82, at a redshift z = 0.0085, show that the transient is a very luminous type Ic supernova, SN1998bw. The peculiar nature of SN1998bw is emphasized by its extraordinary radio properties which require that the radio emitter expand at relativistical speed. Since SN1998bw is very different from all previously observed afterglows of GRBs, our discovery raises the possibility that very different mechanisms may give rise to GRBs, which differ little in their gamma-ray properties.