• We aim at describing and understanding binary interaction processes in systems with very evolved companions. Here, we focus on understanding the origin and determining the properties of the high-velocity outflow observed in one such system. We present a quantitative analysis of BD+46$^{\circ}$442, a post-AGB binary which shows active mass transfer that leads to the creation of a disk-driven outflow or jet. We obtained high-resolution optical spectra from the HERMES spectrograph, mounted on the 1.2m Flemish Mercator Telescope. By performing a time-series analysis of the Halpha profile, we dissected the different components of the system. We deduced the jet geometry by comparing the orbital phased data with our jet model. In order to image the accretion disk around the companion of BD+46$^{\circ}$442, we applied the technique of Doppler tomography. The orbital phase-dependent variations in the Halpha profile can be related to an accretion disk around the companion, from which a high-velocity outflow or jet is launched. Our model shows that there is a clear correlation between the inclination angle and the jet opening angle. The latitudinally dependent velocity structure of our jet model shows a good correspondence to the data, with outflow velocities at least higher than 400km/s. We show that BD+46$^{\circ}$442, is a result of a binary interaction channel. The origin of the fast outflow in this system can be attributed to a gaseous disk around the secondary component, which is most likely a main sequence star. Our analysis suggests the outflow to have a rather wide opening angle instead of being strongly collimated. Similar orbital phase-dependent Halpha profiles are commonly observed in post-AGB binaries. Post-AGB binaries provide ideal test bets to study jet formation and launching mechanisms over a wide range of orbital conditions.
  • Context: Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) binaries are surrounded by stable dusty and gaseous disks similar to the ones around young stellar objects. Whereas significant effort is spent on modeling observations of disks around young stellar objects, the disks around post-AGB binaries receive significantly less attention, even though they pose significant constraints on theories of disk physics and binary evolution. Aims: We want to examine the structure of and phenomena at play in circumbinary disks around post-AGB stars. We continue the analysis of our near-infrared interferometric image of the inner rim of the circumbinary disk around IRAS08544-4431. We want to understand the physics governing this inner disk rim. Methods: We use a radiative transfer model of a dusty disk to reproduce simultaneously the photometry as well as the near-infrared interferometric dataset on IRAS08544-4431. The model assumes hydrostatic equilibrium and takes dust settling self-consistently into account. Results: The best-fit radiative transfer model shows excellent agreement with the spectral energy distribution up to mm wavelengths as well as with the PIONIER visibility data. It requires a rounded inner rim structure, starting at a radius of 8.25 au. However, the model does not fully reproduce the detected over-resolved flux nor the azimuthal flux distribution of the inner rim. While the asymmetric inner disk rim structure is likely to be the consequence of disk-binary interactions, the origin of the additional over-resolved flux remains unclear. Conclusions: As in young stellar objects, the disk inner rim of IRAS08544-4431 is ruled by dust sublimation physics. Additional observations are needed to understand the origin of the extended flux and the azimuthal perturbation at the inner rim of the disk.
  • We report the discovery of MASCARA-1 b, the first exoplanet discovered with the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA (MASCARA). It is a hot Jupiter orbiting a bright $m_V=8.3$, rapidly rotating ($v\sin i_\star > 100~\rm{km~s}^{-1}$) A8 star with a period of $2.148780\pm8\times10^{-6} ~\rm{days}$. The planet has a mass and radius of $3.7\pm0.9~\rm{M}_{\rm{Jup}}$ and $1.5\pm0.3~\rm{R}_{\rm{Jup}}$, respectively. As with most hot Jupiters transiting early-type stars we find a misalignment between the planet orbital axis and the stellar spin axis, which may be signature of the formation and migration histories of this family of planets. MASCARA-1 b has a mean density of $1.5\pm0.9~\rm{g~cm^{-3}}$ and an equilibrium temperature of $2570^{+50}_{-30}~\rm{K}$, one of the highest temperatures known for a hot Jupiter to date. The system is reminiscent of WASP-33, but the host star lacks apparent delta-scuti variations, making the planet an ideal target for atmospheric characterization. We expect this to be the first of a series of hot Jupiters transiting bright early-type stars that will be discovered by MASCARA.
  • We are studying a class of binary post-AGB stars that seem to be systematically surrounded by equatorial disks and slow outflows. Although the rotating dynamics had only been well identified in three cases, the study of such structures is thought to be fundamental to the understanding of the formation of nebulae around evolved stars. We present ALMA maps of 12CO and 13CO J=3-2 lines in one of these sources, IRAS08544-4431. We analyzed the data by means of nebula models, which account for the expectedly composite source and can reproduce the data. From our modeling, we estimated the main nebula parameters, including the structure and dynamics and the density and temperature distributions. We discuss the uncertainties of the derived values and, in particular, their dependence on the distance. Our observations reveal the presence of an equatorial disk in rotation; a low-velocity outflow is also found, probably formed of gas expelled from the disk. The main characteristics of our observations and modeling of IRAS08544-4431 are similar to those of better studied objects, confirming our interpretation. The disk rotation indicates a total central mass of about 1.8 Mo, for a distance of 1100 pc. The disk is found to be relatively extended and has a typical diameter of ~ 4 10^16 cm. The total nebular mass is ~ 2 10^-2 Mo, of which ~ 90% corresponds to the disk. Assuming that the outflow is due to mass loss from the disk, we derive a disk lifetime of ~ 10000 yr. The disk angular momentum is found to be comparable to that of the binary system at present. Assuming that the disk angular momentum was transferred from the binary system, as expected, the high values of the disk angular momentum in this and other similar disks suggest that the size of the stellar orbits has significantly decreased as a consequence of disk formation.
  • LoTr 5 is a planetary nebula with an unusual long-period binary central star. As far as we know, the pair consists of a rapidly rotating G-type star and a hot star, which is responsible for the ionization of the nebula. The rotation period of the G-type star is 5.95 days and the orbital period of the binary is now known to be $\sim$2700 days, one of the longest in central star of planetary nebulae. The spectrum of the G central star shows a complex H$\alpha$ double-peaked profile which varies with very short time scales, also reported in other central stars of planetary nebulae and whose origin is still unknown. We present new radial velocity observations of the central star which allow us to confirm the orbital period for the long-period binary and discuss the possibility of a third component in the system at $\sim$129 days to the G star. This is complemented with the analysis of archival light curves from SuperWASP, ASAS and OMC. From the spectral fitting of the G-type star, we obtain a effective temperature of $T_{\rm eff}$ = 5410$\pm$250 K and surface gravity of $\log g$ = 2.7$\pm$0.5, consistent with both giant and subgiant stars. We also present a detailed analysis of the H$\alpha$ double-peaked profile and conclude that it does not present correlation with the rotation period and that the presence of an accretion disk via Roche lobe overflow is unlikely.
  • To understand the scientific imaging capability, one must characterize the intra-pixel sensitivity variation (IPSV) of the CMOS image sensor. Extracting an IPSV map contributes to an improved detector calibration that allows to eliminate some of the uncertainty in the spatial response of the system. This paper reports the measurement of the sub-pixel sensitivity variation and the extraction of the 2D IPSV map of a front-side illuminated CMOS image sensor with a pixel pitch of 6 {\mu}m. Our optical measurement setup focuses a collimated beam onto the imaging surface with a microscope objective. The spot was scanned in a raster over a single pixel and its immediate neighbors in order to probe its response at selected (sub-pixel) positions. In this work we introduced a novel technique to extract the IPSV map by fitting (forward modeling) the measured data to a mathematical model of the image, generated in a single pixel that allows for a spatially varying sensitivity.
  • Post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars are known to be chemically diverse. In this paper we present the first observational evidence of a star that has failed the third dredge-up (TDU). J005252.87-722842.9 is a A-type ($T_{\rm eff}$ = 8250 $\pm$ 250K) luminous (8200 $\pm$ 700 $\rm L_{\odot}$), metal-poor ($\textrm{[Fe/H]}$ = $- 1.18 \pm$ 0.10), low-mass (M$_{\rm initial}$ $\approx$ 1.5 $-$ 2.0 $\rm M_{\odot}$) post-AGB star in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Through a systematic abundance study, using high-resolution optical spectra from UVES, we found that this likely post-AGB object shows an intriguing photospheric composition with no confirmed carbon-enhancement (upper limit of [C/Fe] $<$ 0.50) nor enrichment of $s$-process elements. We derived an oxygen abundance of [O/Fe] = 0.29 $\pm$ 0.1. For Fe and O, we took into account the effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE). We could not derive an upper limit for the nitrogen abundance as there are no useful nitrogen lines within our spectral coverage. The chemical pattern displayed by this object has not been observed in single or binary post-AGBs. Based on its derived stellar parameters and inferred evolutionary state, single star nucleosynthesis models predict that this star should have undergone TDU episodes while on the AGB and be carbon-enriched. However, our observations are in contrast with these predictions. We identify two possible Galactic analogues which are likely to be post-AGB stars, but the lack of accurate distances (hence luminosities) to these objects does not allow us to confirm their post-AGB status. If they have low luminosities then they are likely to be dusty post-RGB stars. The discovery of J005252.87-722842.9 reveals a new stellar evolutionary channel whereby a star evolves without any third dredge-up episodes.
  • With the availability of parallaxes provided by the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution, it is possible to construct the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) of barium and related stars with unprecedented accuracy. A direct result from the derived HRD is that subgiant CH stars occupy the same region as barium dwarfs, contrary to what their designations imply. By comparing the position of barium stars in the HRD with STAREVOL evolutionary tracks, it is possible to evaluate their masses, provided the metallicity is known. We used an average metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.25 and derived the mass distribution of barium giants. The distribution peaks around 2.5 Msun with a tail at higher masses up to 4.5 Msun. This peak is also seen in the mass distribution of a sample of normal K and M giants used for comparison and is associated with stars located in the red clump. When we compare these mass distributions, we see a deficit of low-mass (1 - 2 Msun) barium giants. This is probably because low-mass stars reach large radii at the tip of the red giant branch, which may have resulted in an early binary interaction. Among barium giants, the high-mass tail is however dominated by stars with barium indices of less than unity, based on a visual inspection of the barium spectral line; that is, these stars have a very moderate barium line strength. We believe that these stars are not genuine barium giants, but rather bright giants, or supergiants, where the barium lines are strengthened because of a positive luminosity effect. Moreover, contrary to previous claims, we do not see differences between the mass distributions of mild and strong barium giants.
  • Whether planetary nebulae (PNe) are predominantly the product of binary stellar evolution as some population synthesis models (PSM) suggest remains an open question. Around 50 short period binary central stars ($P\sim1$ d) are known, but with only four with measured orbital periods over 10 d, our knowledge is severely incomplete. Here we report on the first discovery from a systematic SALT HRS survey for long period binary central stars. We find a 142 d orbital period from radial velocities of the central star of NGC~1360, HIP~16566. NGC~1360 appears to be the product of common-envelope (CE) evolution, with nebula features similar to post-CE PNe, albeit with an orbital period considerably longer than expected to be typical of post-CE PSM. The most striking feature is a newly-identified ring of candidate low-ionisation structures (LIS). Previous spatio-kinematic modelling of the nebula gives a nebula inclination of $30\pm10$ deg, and assuming the binary nucleus is coplanar with the nebula, multi-wavelength observations best fit a more massive, evolved WD companion. A WD companion in a 142 d orbit is not the focus of many PSM, making NGC~1360 a valuable system with which to improve future PSM work. HIP~16566 is amongst many central stars in which large radial velocity variability was found by low-resolution surveys. The discovery of its binary nature may indicate long period binaries may be more common than PSM models predict.
  • Lithium abundance A(Li) and surface rotation are good diagnostic tools to probe the internal mixing and angular momentum transfer in stars. We explore the relation between surface rotation, A(Li) and age in a sample of seismic solar-analogue (SA) stars and study their possible binary nature. We select a sample of 18 SA observed by the NASA Kepler satellite for an in-depth analysis. Their seismic properties and surface rotation are well constrained from previous studies. About 53 hours of high-resolution spectroscopy were obtained to derive fundamental parameters and A(Li). These values were combined and confronted with seismic masses, radii and ages, as well as surface rotation periods. We identify a total of 6 binary systems. A well-defined relation between A(Li) and rotation was obtained. With models constrained by the characterisation of the individual mode frequencies for single stars, we identify a sequence of three SA with similar mass (~1.1Mo) and stellar ages ranging between 1 to 9 Gyr. Within the realistic estimate of ~7% for the mass uncertainty, we find a good agreement between the measured A(Li) and the predicted A(Li) evolution from a grid of models calculated with the Toulouse-Geneva stellar evolution code, which includes rotational internal mixing, calibrated to reproduce solar chemical properties. We present A(Li) for a consistent spectroscopic survey of SA with a mass of 1.00+/-0.15Mo, and characterised through asteroseismology and surface rotation rates based on Kepler observations. The correlation between A(Li) and P_rot supports the gyrochronological concept for stars younger than the Sun. The consensus between measured A(Li) for solar analogues with model grids, calibrated onto the Sun's chemical properties suggests that these targets share the same internal physics. In this light, the solar Li and rotation rate appear to be normal for a star like the Sun.
  • We aim to study the presence of both rotation and expansion in post-AGB nebulae, in particular around IW Car, a binary post-AGB star that was suspected to be surrounded by a Keplerian disk. We obtained high-quality ALMA observations of 12CO and 13CO J=3-2 lines in IW Car. The maps were analyzed by means of a simplified model of CO emission, based on those used for similar objects. Our observations clearly show the presence of gas components in rotation, in an equatorial disk, and expansion, which shows an hourglass-like structure with a symmetry axis perpendicular to the rotation plane and is probably formed of material extracted from the disk. Our modeling can reproduce the observations and shows moderate uncertainties. The rotation velocity corresponds to a central stellar mass of approximately 1 Mo. We also derive the total mass of the molecule-rich nebula, found to be of ~ 4 10e-3 Mo; the outflow is approximately eight times less massive than the disk. From the kinematical age of the outflow and the mass values derived for both components, we infer a (future) lifetime of the disk of approximately 5000--10000 yr.
  • Yellow hypergiants are rare and represent a fast evolutionary stage of massive evolved stars. That evolutionary phase is characterised by a very intense mass loss, the understanding of which is still very limited. Here we report ALMA Compact Array observations of a 50$"$-mosaic toward the Fried Egg nebula, around one of the few Galactic yellow hypergiants IRAS 17163-3907. The emission from the $^{12}$CO J=2-1 line, H30$\alpha$ recombination line, and continuum is imaged at a resolution of $\sim$8$"$, revealing the morphology of the molecular environment around the star. The continuum emission is unresolved and peaks at the position of the star. The radio recombination line H30$\alpha$ shows unresolved emission at the star, with an approximately gaussian spectrum centered on a velocity of 21$\pm$3~km/s with a width of 57$\pm$6~km/s. In contrast, the CO 2-1 emission is complex and decomposes into several components beyond the contamination from interstellar gas in the line of sight. The CO spectrum toward the star is a broad plateau, centered at the systemic velocity of +18 km/s and with an expansion velocity of 100$\pm$10 km/s. Assuming isotropic and constant mass-loss, we estimate a mass-loss rate of 8$\pm$1.5 $\times10^{-5}$~M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. At a radius of 25$"$ from the star, we detect CO emission associated with the dust ring previously imaged by {\it Herschel}. The kinematics of this ring, however, is not consistent with an expanding shell, but show a velocity gradient of $v_{sys} \pm$20 km/s. In addition, we find a puzzling bright feature radially connecting the star to the CO ring, at a velocity of +40 km/s relative to the star. This spur feature may trace a unidirectional ejection event from the star. Our ACA observations reveal the complex morphology around IRAS 17163 and illustrate the breakthroughs that ALMA will bring to the field of massive stellar evolution.
  • Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the \Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al. (2016a,b) and Beck et al (2016a,b), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By investigating the chromospheric and photospheric activity of the solar analogues in this sample, it was shown that for a large fraction of these stars the measured activity levels are compatible to levels of the 11-year solar activity cycle 23. A clear correlation between the lithium abundance and surface rotation was found for rotation periods shorter than the solar value. Comparing the lithium abundance measured in the solar analogues to evolutionary models with the Toulouse-Geneva Evolutionary Code (TGEC), we found that the solar models calibrated to the Sun also correctly describe the set of solar/stellar analogs showing that they share the same internal mixing physics. Finally, the star KIC 3241581 and KIC 10644353 are discussed in more detail.
  • We present a mid-IR interferometric survey of the circumstellar environment of a specific class of post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) binaries. For this class the presence of a compact dusty disk has been postulated on the basis of various spatially unresolved measurements. Our interferometric survey was performed with the MIDI instrument on the VLTI. In total 19 different systems were observed using variable baseline configurations. Combining all the visibilities at a single wavelength at 10.7 micron, we fitted two parametric models to the data: a uniform disk (UD) and a ring model mimicking a temperature gradient. We compared our observables of the whole sample, with synthetic data computed from a grid of radiative transfer models of passively irradiated disks in hydrostatic equilibrium. These models are computed with a Monte Carlo code that has been widely applied to describe the structure of protoplanetary disks around young stellar objects (YSO). The spatially resolved observations show that the majority of our targets cluster closely together in the distance-independent size-colour diagram, and have extremely compact N-band emission regions. The typical uniform disk diameter of the N-band emission region is about 40 mass which corresponds to a typical brightness temperature of 400-600~K. The resolved objects display very similar characteristics in the interferometric observables and in the spectral energy distributions. Therefore, the physical properties of the disks around our targets must be similar. The grid of protoplanetary disk models covers very well the observed objects. Much like for young stars, the spatially resolved N-band emission region is determined by the hot inner rim of the disk. Continued comparisons between post-AGB and protoplanetary disks will help to understand grain growth and disk evolution processes,
  • We report on the discovery of a planetary companion candidate with a minimum mass Msini = 4.6 M_J orbiting the K2 III giant star HD 175370 (KIC 007940959). This star was a target in our program to search for planets around a sample of 95 giant stars observed with Kepler. This detection was made possible using precise stellar radial velocity measurements of HD 175370 taken over five years and four months using the coude echelle spectrograph of the 2-m Alfred Jensch Telescope and the fibre-fed echelle spectrograph HERMES of the 1.2-m Mercator Telescope. Our radial velocity measurements reveal a periodic (349.5 days) variation with a semi-amplitude K = 133 m/s, superimposed on a long-term trend. A low-mass stellar companion with an orbital period of ~88 years in a highly eccentric orbit and a planet in a Keplerian orbit with an eccentricity e = 0.22 are the most plausible explanation of the radial velocity variations. However, we cannot exclude the existence of stellar envelope pulsations as a cause for the low-amplitude radial velocity variations and only future continued monitoring of this system may answer this uncertainty. From Kepler photometry we find that HD 175370 is most likely a low-mass red-giant branch or asymptotic-giant branch star.
  • CMOS imagers are becoming increasingly popular in astronomy. A very low noise level is required to observe extremely faint targets and to get high-precision flux measurements. Although CMOS technology offers many advantages over CCDs, a major bottleneck is still the read noise. To move from an industrial CMOS sensor to one suitable for scientific applications, an improved design that optimizes the noise level is essential. Here, we study the 1/f and thermal noise performance of the source follower (SF) of a CMOS pixel in detail. We identify the relevant design parameters, and analytically study their impact on the noise level using the BSIM3v3 noise model with an enhanced model of gate capacitance. Our detailed analysis shows that the dependence of the 1/f noise on the geometrical size of the source follower is not limited to minimum channel length, compared to the classical approach to achieve the minimum 1/f noise. We derive the optimal gate dimensions (the width and the length) of the source follower that minimize the 1/f noise, and validate our results using numerical simulations. By considering the thermal noise or white noise along with 1/f noise, the total input noise of the source follower depends on the capacitor ratio CG/CFD and the drain current (Id). Here, CG is the total gate capacitance of the source follower and CFD is the total floating diffusion capacitor at the input of the source follower. We demonstrate that the optimum gate capacitance (CG) depends on the chosen bias current but ranges from CFD/3 to CFD to achieve the minimum total noise of the source follower. Numerical calculation and circuit simulation with 180nm CMOS technology are performed to validate our results.
  • We present new high-quality ALMA observations of the Red Rectangle (a well known post-AGB object) in C17O J=6-5 and H13CN J=4-3 line emission and results from a new reduction of already published 13CO J=3-2 data. A detailed model fitting of all the molecular line data, including previous maps and single-dish spectra, was performed using a sophisticated code. These observations and the corresponding modeling allowed us to deepen the analysis of the nebular properties. We also stress the uncertainties in the model fitting. We confirm the presence of a rotating equatorial disk and an outflow, which is mainly formed of gas leaving the disk. The mass of the disk is ~ 0.01 Mo, and that of the CO-rich outflow is ~ 10 times smaller. High temperatures of ~ 100 K are derived for most components. From comparison of the mass values, we roughly estimate the lifetime of the rotating disk, which is found to be of about 10000 yr. Taking data of a few other post-AGB composite nebulae into account, we find that the lifetimes of disks around post-AGB stars typically range between 5000 and more than 20000 yr. The angular momentum of the disk is found to be high, ~ 9 Mo AU km/s, which is comparable to that of the stellar system at present. Our observations of H13CN show a particularly wide velocity dispersion and indicate that this molecule is only abundant in the inner Keplerian disk, at ~ 60 AU from the stellar system. We suggest that HCN is formed in a dense photodissociation region (PDR) due to the UV excess known to be produced by the stellar system, following chemical mechanisms that are well established for interstellar medium PDRs and disks orbiting young stars. We further suggest that this UV excess could lead to the efficient formation and excitation of PAHs and other C-bearing macromolecules, whose emission is very intense in the optical counterpart.
  • Classical novae are the product of thermonuclear runaway-initiated explosions occurring on accreting white dwarfs. V339 Del (Nova Delphinus 2013) was one of the brightest classical novae of the last hundred years. Spectroscopy and photometry are available from $\gamma$-rays through infrared at stages that have frequently not been well observed. The complete data set is intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with modeling and for understanding more sparsely monitored historical classical and recurrent novae. This paper is the first in the series of reports on the development of the nova. We report here on the early stages of the outburst, through the X-ray active stage. A time sequence of optical, flux calibrated high resolution spectra was obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) using FIES simultaneously, or contemporaneously, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope during the early stages of the outburst. These were supplemented with MERCATOR/HERMES optical spectra. High resolution IUE ultraviolet spectra of OS And 1986, taken during the Fe curtain phase, served as a template for the distance determination. We used standard plasma diagnostics (e.g., [O III] and [N II] line ratios, and the H$\beta$ line flux) to constrain electron densities and temperatures of the ejecta. Using Monte Carlo modeling of the ejecta, we derived the structure, filling factor, and mass from comparisons of the optical and ultraviolet line profiles.
  • We present the first near-IR milli-arcsecond-scale image of a post-AGB binary that is surrounded by hot circumbinary dust. A very rich interferometric data set in six spectral channels was acquired of IRAS08544-4431 with the new RAPID camera on the PIONIER beam combiner at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A broadband image in the \textit{H} band was reconstructed by combining the data of all spectral channels using the SPARCO method. We spatially separate all the building blocks of the IRAS08544-4431 system in our milliarcsecond-resolution image. Our dissection reveals a dust sublimation front that is strikingly similar to that expected in early-stage protoplanetary disks, as well as an unexpected flux signal of $\sim$4\% from the secondary star. The energy output from this companion indicates the presence of a compact circum-companion accretion disk, which is likely the origin of the fast outflow detected in H$\alpha$. Our image provides the most detailed view into the heart of a dusty circumstellar disk to date. Our results demonstrate that binary evolution processes and circumstellar disk evolution can be studied in detail in space and over time.
  • Context: We present a newly discovered class of low-luminosity, dusty, evolved objects in the Magellanic Clouds. These objects have dust excesses, stellar parameters, and spectral energy distributions similar to those of dusty post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. However, they have lower luminosities and hence lower masses. We suggest that they have evolved off the red giant branch (RGB) instead of the AGB as a result of binary interaction. Aims: In this study we aim to place these objects in an evolutionary context and establish an evolutionary connection between RGB binaries (such as the sequence E variables) and our new sample of objects. Methods: We compared the theoretically predicted birthrates of the progeny of RGB binaries to the observational birthrates of the new sample of objects. Results: We find that there is order-of-magnitude agreement between the observed and predicted birthrates of post-RGB stars. The sources of uncertainty in the birthrates are discussed; the most important sources are probably the observational incompleteness factor and the post-RGB evolution rates. We also note that mergers are relatively common low on the RGB and that stars low on the RGB with mid-IR excesses may recently have undergone a merger. Conclusions: Our sample of dusty post-RGB stars most likely provides the first observational evidence for a newly discovered phase in binary evolution: post-RGB binaries with circumstellar dust.
  • Solar-analog stars provide an excellent opportunity to study the Sun's evolution, i.e. the changes with time in stellar structure, activity, or rotation for solar-like stars. The unparalleled photometric data from the NASA space telescope Kepler allows us to study and characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology. We aim to spectroscopically investigate the fundamental parameter and chromospheric activity of solar analogues and twins, based on observations obtained with the HERMES spectrograph and combine them with asteroseismology. Therefore, we need to build a solar atlas for the spectrograph, to provide accurate calibrations of the spectroscopically determined abundances of solar and late type stars observed with this instrument and thus perform differential spectral comparisons. We acquire high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectroscopy to construct three solar reference spectra by observing the reflected light of Vesta and Victoria asteroids and Europa (100<S/N<450) with the \Hermes spectrograph. We then observe the Kepler solar analog KIC3241581 (S/N~170). We constructed three solar spectrum atlases from 385 to 900 nm obtained with the Hermes spectrograph from observations of two bright asteroids and Europa. A comparison between our solar spectra atlas to the Kurucz and HARPS solar spectrum shows an excellent agreement. KIC3241581 was found to be a long-periodic binary system. The fundamental parameter for the stellar primary component are Teff=5689+/-11K, logg=4.385+/-0.005, [Fe/H]=+0.22+/-0.01, being in agreement with the published global seismic values confirming its status of solar analogue. KIC 3241581 is a metal rich solar analogue with a solar-like activity level in a binary system of unknown period. The chromospheric activity level is compatible to the solar magnetic activity.
  • The HERMES spectrograph installed on the 1.2-m Mercator telescope has been used to monitor the radial velocity of 13 low-metallicity carbon stars, among which 7 Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) stars and 6 CH stars. All stars but one show clear evidence for binarity. New orbits are obtained for 8 systems. The sample covers an extended range in orbital periods, extending from 3.4 d (for the dwarf carbon star HE 0024-2523) to about 54 yr (for the CH star HD 26, the longest known among barium, CH and extrinsic S stars). Three systems exhibit low-amplitude velocity variations with periods close to 1 yr superimposed on a long-term trend. In the absence of an accurate photometric monitoring of these systems, it is not clear yet whether these variations are the signature of a very low-mass companion, or of regular envelope pulsations. The period - eccentricity (P - e) diagram for the 40 low-metallicity carbon stars with orbits now available shows no difference between CH and CEMP-s stars (the latter corresponding to those CEMP stars enriched in s-process elements, as are CH stars). We suggest that they must be considered as one and the same family and that their different names only stem from historical reasons. Indeed, these two families have as well very similar mass-function distributions, corresponding to companions with masses in the range 0.5 - 0.7 Msun, indicative of white-dwarf companions, adopting 0.8 - 0.9 Msun for the primary component. This result confirms that CH and CEMP-s stars obey the same mass-transfer scenario as their higher-metallicity analogs, the barium stars. The P - e diagrams of barium, CH and CEMP-s stars are indeed very similar. They reveal two different groups of systems: one with short orbital periods (P < 1000 d) and mostly circular or almost circular orbits, and another with longer-period and eccentric (e > 0.1) orbits.
  • The enrichment in s-process elements of barium stars is known to be due to pollution by mass transfer from a companion formerly on the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB), now a carbon-oxygen white-dwarf (WD). This paper investigates the relationship between the s-process enrichment in the barium star and the mass of its WD companion. It is expected that helium WDs, which have masses smaller than about 0.5 Msun and never reached the AGB phase, should not pollute with s-process elements their giant companion, which should thus never turn into a barium star. Spectra with a resolution of R ~ 86000 were obtained with the HERMES spectrograph on the 1.2-m Mercator telescope for a sample of 11 binary systems involving WD companions of various masses. We use standard 1D LTE MARCS model atmospheres coupled with the Turbospectrum radiative-transfer code to derive the atmospheric parameters using equivalent widths of FeI and Fe II lines. The abundances of s-process elements for the entire sample of 11 binary stars were derived homogeneously. The sample encompasses all levels of overabundances: from solar [s/Fe]=0 to 1.5 dex in the 2 binary systems with S-star primaries (for which dedicated MARCS model atmospheres were used). The primary components of binary systems with a WD more massive than 0.5 Msun are enriched in s-process elements. We also found a trend of increasing [s/Fe] with [C/Fe] or [(C+N)/Fe]. Our results conform to the expectation that binary systems with WD companions less massive than 0.5 Msun do not host barium stars.
  • A radial-velocity monitoring of the Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) star HE 0017+0055 over 8 years with the Nordic Optical Telescope and Mercator telescopes reveals variability with a period of 384 d and amplitude of 540$\pm27$ m s$^{-1}$, superimposed on a nearly linear long-term decline of $\sim$1 m s$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$. High-resolution HERMES/Mercator and Keck/HIRES spectra have been used to derive elemental abundances using 1-D LTE MARCS models. A metallicity of [Fe/H] $\sim -2.4$ is found, along with s-process overabundances on the order of 2 dex (with the exception of [Y/Fe] $\sim+0.5$), and most notably overabundances of r-process elements like Sm, Eu, Dy, and Er in the range 0.9 - 2.0 dex. With [Ba/Fe] $ > 1.9$ dex and [Eu/Fe] = 2.3 dex, HE 0017+0055 is a CEMP-rs star. It appears to be a giant star below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). The s-process pollution must therefore originate from mass transfer from a companion formerly on the AGB, now a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (WD). If the 384 d velocity variations are attributed to the WD companion, its orbit must be seen almost face-on, with $i \sim 2.3^\circ$, because the mass function is very small: $f(M_1,M_2) = (6.1\pm1.1)\times10^{-6}$ Msun. Alternatively, the WD orbital motion could be responsible for the long-term velocity variations, with a period of several decades. The 384 d variations should then be attributed either to a low-mass inner companion (perhaps a brown dwarf, depending on the orbital inclination), or to stellar pulsations. The latter possibility is made likely by the fact that similar low-amplitude velocity variations, with periods close to 1 yr, have been reported for other CEMP stars in a companion paper (Jorissen et al., 2015). A definite conclusion about the origin of the 384 d velocity variations should however await the detection of synchronous low-amplitude photometric variations.
  • We explore modifications to the current scenario for the slow neutron capture process in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to account for the Pb deficiency observed in post-AGB stars of low metallicity ([Fe/H] ~ -1.2) and low initial mass (~ 1 - 1.5 Msun) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We calculated the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis for a 1.3 Msun star with [Fe/H]=-1.3 and tested different amounts and distributions of protons leading to the production of the main neutron source within the 13C-pocket and proton ingestion scenarios. No s-process models can fully reproduce the abundance patterns observed in the post-AGB stars. When the Pb production is lowered the abundances of the elements between Eu and Pb, such as Er, Yb, W, and Hf, are also lowered to below those observed. Neutron-capture processes with neutron densities intermediate between the s and the rapid neutron-capture processes may provide a solution to this problem and be a common occurrence in low-mass, low-metallicity AGB stars.