• A far-infrared observatory such as the {\it SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics} ({\it SPICA}), with its unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity, would unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last $\sim10$ Gyr of the Universe ($z=1.5-2$), through the use of far- and mid-infrared molecular and ionic fine structure lines that trace outflowing and infalling gas. Outflowing gas is identified in the far-infrared through P-Cygni line shapes and absorption blueshifted wings in molecular lines with high dipolar moments, and through emission line wings of fine-structure lines of ionized gas. We quantify the detectability of galaxy-scale massive molecular and ionized outflows as a function of redshift in AGN-dominated, starburst-dominated, and main-sequence galaxies, explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, and describe the most significant synergies with other current and future observatories that will measure feedback in galaxies via complementary tracers at other wavelengths.
  • We report on the energetics of molecular outflows in 14 local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that show unambiguous outflow signatures (P-Cygni profiles or high-velocity absorption wings) in the far-infrared lines of OH measured with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer. Detection of both ground-state (at 119 and 79 um) and one or more radiatively-excited (at 65 and 84 um) lines allows us to model the nuclear gas (<~300 pc) as well as the more extended components using spherically symmetric radiative transfer models. The highest molecular outflow velocities are found in buried sources, in which slower but massive expansion of the nuclear gas is also observed. With the exception of a few outliers, the outflows have momentum fluxes of (2-5)xL_IR/c and mechanical luminosities of (0.1-0.3)% of L_IR. The moderate momentum boosts in these sources (<~3) suggest that the outflows are mostly momentum-driven by the combined effects of AGN and nuclear starbursts, as a result of radiation pressure, winds, and supernovae remnants. In some sources (~20%), however, powerful (10^{10.5-11} Lsun) AGN feedback and (partially) energy-conserving phases are required, with momentum boosts in the range 3-20. These outflows appear to be stochastic strong-AGN feedback events that occur throughout the merging process. In a few sources, the outflow activity in the innermost regions has subsided in the last ~1 Myr. While OH traces the molecular outflows at sub-kpc scales, comparison of the masses traced by OH with those previously inferred from tracers of more extended outflowing gas suggests that most mass is loaded (with loading factors of Mdot/SFR=1-10) from the central galactic cores (a few x 100 pc). Outflow depletion timescales are <10^8 yr, shorter than the gas consumption timescales by factors of 1.1-15, and are anti-correlated with the AGN luminosity.
  • Herschel/PACS observations of 29 local (Ultra-)Luminous Infrared Galaxies, including both starburst and AGN-dominated sources as diagnosed in the mid-infrared/optical, show that the equivalent width of the absorbing OH 65 um Pi_{3/2} J=9/2-7/2 line (W_{eq}(OH65)) with lower level energy E_{low}~300 K, is anticorrelated with the [C ii]158 um line to far-infrared luminosity ratio, and correlated with the far-infrared luminosity per unit gas mass and with the 60-to-100 um far-infrared color. While all sources are in the active L_{IR}/M_{H2}>50 Lsun/Msun mode as derived from previous CO line studies, the OH65 absorption shows a bimodal distribution with a discontinuity at L_{FIR}/M_{H2}~100 Lsun/Msun. In the most buried sources, OH65 probes material partially responsible for the silicate 9.7 um absorption. Combined with observations of the OH 71 um Pi_{1/2} J=7/2-5/2 doublet (E_{low}~415 K), radiative transfer models characterized by the equivalent dust temperature, Tdust, and the continuum optical depth at 100 um, tau_{100}, indicate that strong [C ii]158 um deficits are associated with far-IR thick (tau_{100}>~0.7, N_{H}>~10^{24} cm^{-2}), warm (Tdust>~60 K) structures where the OH 65 um absorption is produced, most likely in circumnuclear disks/tori/cocoons. With their high L_{FIR}/M_{H2} ratios and columns, the presence of these structures is expected to give rise to strong [C ii] deficits. W_{eq}(OH65) probes the fraction of infrared luminosity arising from these compact/warm environments, which is >~30-50% in sources with high W_{eq}({OH65}). Sources with high W_{eq}({OH65}) have surface densities of both L_{IR} and M_{H2} higher than inferred from the half-light (CO or UV/optical) radius, tracing coherent structures that represent the most buried/active stage of (circum)nuclear starburst-AGN co-evolution.
  • We report on the Herschel/PACS observations of OH in Mrk 231, with detections in 9 doublets observed within the PACS range, and present radiative transfer models for the outflowing OH. Signatures of outflowing gas are found in up to 6 OH doublets with different excitation requirements. At least two outflowing components are identified, one with OH radiatively excited, and the other with low excitation, presumably spatially extended. Particularly prominent, the blue wing of the absorption detected in the in-ladder 2Pi_{3/2} J=9/2-7/2 OH doublet at 65 um, with E_lower=290 K, indicates that the excited outflowing gas is generated in a compact and warm (circum)nuclear region. Because the excited, outflowing OH gas in Mrk 231 is associated with the warm, far-IR continuum source, it is likely more compact (diameter of 200-300 pc) than that probed by CO and HCN. Nevertheless, its mass-outflow rate per unit of solid angle as inferred from OH is similar to that previously derived from CO, >~70x(2.5x10^{-6}/X_{OH}) Msun yr^{-1} sr^{-1}, where X_{OH} is the OH abundance relative to H nuclei. In spherical symmetry, this would correspond to >~850x(2.5x10^{-6}/X_{OH}) Msun yr^{-1}, though significant collimation is inferred from the line profiles. The momentum flux of the excited component attains ~15 L_{AGN}/c, with an OH column density of (1.5-3)x10^{17} cm^-2 and a mechanical luminosity of ~10^{11} Lsun. The detection of very excited OH peaking at central velocities indicates the presence of a nuclear reservoir of gas rich in OH, plausibly the 130-pc scale circumnuclear torus previously detected in OH megamaser emission, that may be feeding the outflow. An exceptional ^{18}OH enhancement, with OH/^{18}OH<~30 at both central and blueshifted velocities, is likely the result of interstellar-medium processing by recent starburst/SNe activity.
  • The mid-infrared (MIR) spectra observed with the \textit{Spitzer} Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) provide a valuable dataset for untangling the physical processes and conditions within galaxies. This paper presents the first attempt to blindly learn fundamental spectral components of MIR galaxy spectra, using non-negative matrix factorisation (NMF). NMF is a recently developed multivariate technique shown to be successful in blind source separation problems. Unlike the more popular multivariate analysis technique, principal component analysis, NMF imposes the condition that weights and spectral components are non-negative. This more closely resembles the physical process of emission in the mid-infrared, resulting in physically intuitive components. By applying NMF to galaxy spectra in the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS sources (CASSIS), we find similar components amongst different NMF sets. These similar components include two for AGN emission and one for star formation. [... ABBREVIATED...] We show an NMF set with seven components can reconstruct the general spectral shape of a wide variety of objects, though struggle to fit the varying strength of emission lines. We also show that the seven components can be used to separate out different types of objects. We model this separation with Gaussian Mixtures modelling and use the result to provide a classification tool. We also show the NMF components can be used to separate out the emission from AGN and star formation regions and define a new star formation/AGN diagnostic which is consistent with all mid-infrared diagnostics already in use but has the advantage that it can be applied to mid-infrared spectra with low signal to noise or with limited spectral range. The 7 NMF components and code for classification are made public on arxiv and are available at: \url{https://github.com/pdh21/NMF_software/}
  • Herschel/PACS spectroscopy of the luminous infrared galaxies NGC4418 and Arp220 reveals high excitation in H2O, OH, HCN, and NH3. In NGC4418, absorption lines were detected with E_low>800 K (H2O), 600 K (OH), 1075 K (HCN), and 600 K (NH3), while in Arp220 the excitation is somewhat lower. While outflow signatures in moderate excitation lines are seen in Arp220 as reported in previous studies, in NGC4418 the lines tracing its outer regions are redshifted relative to the nucleus, suggesting an inflow with Mdot<~12 Msun yr^{-1}. Both galaxies have warm (Tdust>~100 K) nuclear continuum components, together with a more extended component that is much more prominent and massive in Arp220. A chemical dichotomy is found in both sources: on the one hand, the nuclear regions have high H2O abundances, ~10^{-5}, and high HCN/H2O and HCN/NH3 column density ratios of 0.1-0.4 and 2-5, respectively, indicating a chemistry typical of evolved hot cores where grain mantle evaporation has occurred. On the other hand, the high OH abundance, with OH/H2O ratios of ~0.5, indicates the effects of X-rays and/or cosmic rays. The nuclear media have surface brightnesses >~10^{13} Lsun/kpc^2 and are estimated to be thick (N_H>~10^{25} cm^{-2}). While NGC4418 shows weak absorption in H2^{18}O and ^{18}OH, with a ^{16}O-to-^{18}O ratio of >~250-500, the strong absorption of the rare isotopologues in Arp220 indicates ^{16}O-to-^{18}O of 70-130. Further away from the nuclear regions, the H2O abundance decreases to <~10^{-7} and the OH/H2O ratio is 2.5-10. Despite the different scales of NGC4418, Arp220, and Mrk231, preliminary evidence is found for an evolutionary sequence from infall, hot-core like chemistry, and solar oxygen isotope ratio to high velocity outflow, disruption of the hot core chemistry and cumulative high mass stellar processing of 18O.
  • New optical HST, Spitzer, GALEX, and Chandra observations of the single-nucleus, luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) merger IC 883 are presented. The galaxy is a member of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), and is of particular interest for a detailed examination of a luminous late-stage merger due to the richness of the optically-visible star clusters and the extended nature of the nuclear X-ray, mid-IR, CO and radio emission. In the HST ACS images, the galaxy is shown to contain 156 optically visible star clusters distributed throughout the nuclear regions and tidal tails of the merger, with a majority of visible clusters residing in an arc ~ 3-7 kpc from the position of the mid-infrared core of the galaxy. The luminosity functions of the clusters have an alpha_F435W ~ -2.17+/-0.22 and alpha_F814W ~ -2.01+/-0.21. Further, the colors and absolute magnitudes of the majority of the clusters are consistent with instantaneous burst population synthesis model ages in the range of a few x10^7 - 10^8 yrs (for 10^5 M_sun clusters), but may be as low as few x10^6 yrs with extinction factored in. The X-ray and mid-IR spectroscopy are indicative of predominantly starburst-produced nuclear emission, and the star formation rate is ~ 80 M_sun / yr. The kinematics of the CO emission and the morphology of both the CO and radio emission are consistent with the nuclear starburst being situated in a highly inclined disk 2 kpc in diameter with an infrared surface brightness mu_IR ~ 2x10^11 L_sun kpc^-2, a factor of 10 less than that of the Orion star-forming region. Finally, the detection of the [Ne V] 14.32 um emission line is evidence that an AGN is present. The faintness of the line (i.e., [Ne V] / [Ne II] um ~ 0.01) and the small equivalent width of the 6.2 um PAH feature ($= 0.39\mu$m) are both indicative of a relatively weak AGN. (abridged)
  • We investigate the molecular gas properties of a sample of 23 galaxies in order to find and test chemical signatures of galaxy evolution and to compare them to IR evolutionary tracers. Observation at 3 mm wavelengths were obtained with the EMIR broadband receiver, mounted on the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. We compare the emission of the main molecular species with existing models of chemical evolution by means of line intensity ratios diagrams and principal component analysis. We detect molecular emission in 19 galaxies in two 8 GHz-wide bands centred at 88 and 112 GHz. The main detected transitions are the J=1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, HCN, HNC, HCO+, CN, and C2H. We also detect HC3N J=10-9 in the galaxies IRAS 17208, IC 860, NGC 4418, NGC 7771, and NGC 1068. The only HC3N detections are in objects with HCO+/HCN<1 and warm IRAS colours. Galaxies with the highest HC3N/HCN ratios have warm IRAS colours (60/100 {\mu}m>0.8). The brightest HC3N emission is found in IC 860, where we also detect the molecule in its vibrationally excited state.We find low HNC/HCN line ratios (<0.5), that cannot be explained by existing PDR or XDR chemical models. Bright HC3N emission in HCO+-faint objects may imply that these are not dominated by X-ray chemistry. Thus the HCN/HCO+ line ratio is not, by itself, a reliable tracer of XDRs. Bright HC3N and faint HCO+ could be signatures of embedded starformation, instead of AGN activity.
  • We present an analysis of the mid-infrared emission lines for a sample of 12 low metallicity Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies based on high resolution observations obtained with Infrared Spectrograph on board the {\rm Spitzer} Space Telescope. We compare our sample with a local sample of typical starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), to study the ionization field of starbursts over a broad range of physical parameters and examine its difference from the one produced by AGN. The high-ionization line [OIV]25.89$\mu$m is detected in most of the BCDs, starbursts, and AGNs in our sample. We propose a diagnostic diagram of the line ratios [OIV]25.89$\mu$m/[SIII]33.48$\mu$m as a function of [NeIII]15.56$\mu$m/[NeII]12.81$\mu$m which can be useful in identifying the principal excitation mechanism in a galaxy. Galaxies in this diagram split naturally into two branches. Classic AGNs as well as starburst galaxies with an AGN component populate the upper branch, with stronger AGNs displaying higher [NeIII]/[NeII] ratios. BCDs and pure starbursts are located in the lower branch. We find that overall the placement of galaxies on this diagram correlates well with their corresponding locations in the log([NII]/H$\alpha$) vs. log([OIII]/H$\beta$) diagnostic diagram, which has been widely used in the optical. The two diagrams provide consistent classifications of the excitation mechanism in a galaxy. On the other hand, the diagram of [NeIII]15.56$\mu$m/[NeII]12.81$\mu$m vs. [SIV]10.51$\mu$m/[SIII]18.71$\mu$m is not as efficient in separating AGNs from BCDs and pure starbursts. (abridged)
  • We analyze the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Dust emission dominates the MIR spectra of ULIRGs, and the reprocessed radiation that emerges is independent of the underlying heating spectrum. Instead, the resulting emission depends sensitively on the geometric distribution of the dust, which we diagnose with comparisons of numerical simulations of radiative transfer. Quantifying the silicate emission and absorption features that appear near 10 and 18um requires a reliable determination of the continuum, and we demonstrate that including a measurement of the continuum at intermediate wavelength (between the features) produces accurate results at all optical depths. With high-quality spectra, we successfully use the silicate features to constrain the dust chemistry. The observations of the ULIRGs and local sightlines require dust that has a relatively high 18/10um absorption ratio of the silicate features (around 0.5). Specifically, the cold dust of Ossenkopf et al. (1992) is consistent with the observations, while other dust models are not. We use the silicate feature strengths to identify two families of ULIRGs, in which the dust distributions are fundamentally different. Optical spectral classifications are related to these families. In ULIRGs that harbor an active galactic nucleus, the spectrally broad lines are detected only when the nuclear surroundings are clumpy. In contrast, the sources of lower ionization optical spectra are deeply embedded in smooth distributions of optically thick dust.
  • We explore the relationships between the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) feature strengths, mid-infrared continuum luminosities, far-infrared spectral slopes, optical spectroscopic classifications, and silicate optical depths within a sample of 107 ULIRGs observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The detected 6.2 micron PAH equivalent widths (EQWs) in the sample span more than two orders of magnitude (0.006-0.8 micron), and ULIRGs with HII-like optical spectra or steep far-infrared spectral slopes (S_{25} / S_{60} < 0.2) typically have 6.2 micron PAH EQWs that are half that of lower-luminosity starbursts. A significant fraction (~40-60%) of HII-like, LINER-like, and cold ULIRGs have very weak PAH EQWs. Many of these ULIRGs also have large (tau_{9.7} > 2.3) silicate optical depths. The far-infrared spectral slope is strongly correlated with PAH EQW, but not with silicate optical depth. In addition, the PAH EQW decreases with increasing rest-frame 24 micron luminosity. We argue that this trend results primarily from dilution of the PAH EQW by continuum emission from dust heated by a compact central source, probably an AGN. High luminosity, high-redshift sources studied with Spitzer appear to have a much larger range in PAH EQW than seen in local ULIRGs, which is consistent with extremely luminous starburst systems being absent at low redshift, but present at early epochs.
  • We present a new multi-component spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition method and use it to analyze the ultraviolet to millimeter wavelength SEDs of a sample of dusty infrared-luminous galaxies. SEDs are constructed from spectroscopic and photometric data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, in conjunction with photometry from the literature. Each SED is decomposed into emission from populations of stars, an AGN accretion disk, PAHs, atomic and molecular lines, and distributions of graphite and silicate grains. Decompositions of the SEDs of the template starburst galaxies NGC7714 and NGC2623 and the template AGNs PG0804+761 and Mrk463 provide baseline properties to aid in quantifying the strength of star-formation and accretion in the composite systems NGC6240 and Mrk1014. We find that obscured radiation from stars is capable of powering the total dust emission from NGC6240, although we cannot rule out a contribution from a deeply embedded AGN visible only in X-rays. The decomposition of Mrk1014 is consistent with ~65% of its power emerging from an AGN and ~35% from star-formation. We suggest that many of the variations in our template starburst SEDs may be explained in terms of the different mean optical depths through the clouds of dust surrounding the young stars within each galaxy. Prompted by the divergent far-IR properties of our template AGNs, we suggest that variations in the relative orientation of their AGN accretion disks with respect to the disks of the galaxies hosting them may result in different amounts of AGN-heated cold dust emission emerging from their host galaxies. We estimate that 30-50% of the far-IR and PAH emission from Mrk1014 may originate from such AGN-heated material in its host galaxy disk.
  • (Abridged) We present R~600, 10-37um spectra of 53 ULIRGs at z<0.32, taken using the IRS on board Spitzer. All of the spectra show fine structure emission lines of Ne, O, S, Si and Ar, as well as molecular Hydrogen lines. Some ULIRGs also show emission lines of Cl, Fe, P, and atomic Hydrogen, and/or absorption features from C_2H_2, HCN, and OH. We employ diagnostics based on the fine-structure lines, as well as the EWs and luminosities of PAH features and the strength of the 9.7um silicate absorption feature (S_sil), to explore the power source behind the infrared emission in ULIRGs. We show that the IR emission from the majority of ULIRGs is powered mostly by star formation, with only ~20% of ULIRGs hosting an AGN with a comparable or greater IR luminosity than the starburst. The detection of the 14.32um [NeV] line in just under half the sample however implies that an AGN contributes significantly to the mid-IR flux in ~42% of ULIRGs. The emission line ratios, luminosities and PAH EWs are consistent with the starbursts and AGN in ULIRGs being more extincted, and for the starbursts more compact, versions of those in lower luminosity systems. The excitations and electron densities in the NLRs of ULIRGs appear comparable to those of lower luminosity starbursts, though there is evidence that the NLR gas in ULIRGs is more dense. We show that the combined luminosity of the 12.81um [NeII] and 15.56um [NeIII] lines correlates with both IR luminosity and the luminosity of the 6.2 micron and 11.2 micron PAH features in ULIRGs, and use this to derive a calibration between PAH luminosity and star formation rate. Finally, we show that ULIRGs with 0.8 < S_sil < 2.4 are likely to be powered mainly by star formation, but that ULIRGs with S_sil < 0.8, and possibly those with S_sil > 2.4, contain an IR-luminous AGN.
  • The silicate cross section peak near 10um produces emission and absorption features in the spectra of dusty galactic nuclei observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Especially in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, the observed absorption feature can be extremely deep, as IRAS 08572+3915 illustrates. A foreground screen of obscuration cannot reproduce this observed feature, even at large optical depth. Instead, the deep absorption requires a nuclear source to be deeply embedded in a smooth distribution of material that is both geometrically and optically thick. In contrast, a clumpy medium can produce only shallow absorption or emission, which are characteristic of optically-identified active galactic nuclei. In general, the geometry of the dusty region and the total optical depth, rather than the grain composition or heating spectrum, determine the silicate feature's observable properties. The apparent optical depth calculated from the ratio of line to continuum emission generally fails to accurately measure the true optical depth. The obscuring geometry, not the nature of the embedded source, also determines the far-IR spectral shape.
  • We have conducted a survey of Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope, obtaining spectra from 5.0-38.5um for 77 sources with 0.02<z <0.93. Observations of the pure rotational H2 lines S(3) 9.67um, S(2) 12.28um, and S(1) 17.04um are used to derive the temperature and mass of the warm molecular gas. We detect H2 in 77% of the sample, and all ULIRGs with F(60um)>2Jy. The average warm molecular gas mass is ~2x10^8solar-masses. High extinction, inferred from the 9.7um silicate absorption depth, is not observed along the line of site to the molecular gas. The derived H2 mass does not depend on F(25um)/F(60um), which has been used to infer either starburst or AGN dominance. Similarly, the molecular mass does not scale with the 25 or 60um luminosities. In general, the H2 emission is consistent with an origin in photo-dissociation regions associated with star formation. We detect the S(0) 28.22um emission line in a few ULIRGs. Including this line in the model fits tends to lower the temperature by ~50-100K, resulting in a significant increase in the gas mass. The presence of a cooler component cannot be ruled out in the remainder of our sample, for which we do not detect the S(0) line. The measured S(7) 5.51um line fluxes in six ULIRGs implies ~3x10^6 solar-masses of hot (~1400K) H2. The warm gas mass is typically less than 1% of the cold gas mass derived from CO observations.
  • We present low-resolution (64 < R < 124) mid-infrared (8--38 micron) Spitzer/IRS spectra of two z~1.3 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LFIR~10^13) discovered in a Spitzer/MIPS survey of the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a bright 160 micron source with a large infrared-to-optical flux density ratio and a possible lensing amplification of <~10. The 6.2, 7.7, 11.3, and 12.8 micron PAH emission bands in its IRS spectrum indicate a redshift of z~1.3. The large equivalent width of the 6.2 micron PAH feature indicates that at least 50% of the mid-infrared energy is generated in a starburst, an interpretation that is supported by a large [NeII]/[NeIII] ratio and a low upper limit on the X-ray luminosity. SST24 J142827.19+354127.71 has the brightest 24 micron flux (10.55 mJy) among optically faint (R > 20) galaxies in the NDWFS. Its mid-infrared spectrum lacks emission features, but the broad 9.7 micron silicate absorption band places this source at z~1.3. Given this redshift, SST24 J142827.19+354127.71 has among the largest rest-frame 5 micron luminosities known. The similarity of its SED to those of known AGN-dominated ULIRGs and its lack of either PAH features or large amounts of cool dust indicate that the powerful mid-infrared emission is dominated by an active nucleus rather than a starburst. Our results illustrate the power of the IRS in identifying massive galaxies in the ``redshift desert'' and in discerning their power sources. Because they are bright, MIPS J142824.0+352619 (pending future observations to constrain its lensing amplification) and SST24 J142827.19+354127.71 are useful z>1 templates of a high luminosity starburst and AGN, respectively.
  • IR emission bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 um are generally attributed to IR fluorescence from (mainly) FUV pumped PAHs. As such, they trace the FUV stellar flux and are a measure of star formation. We examined the IR spectral characteristics of Galactic star forming regions, normal and starburst galaxies, AGNs and ULIRGs. The goal is to analyze if PAH bands are a good qualitative and/or quantitative tracer of star formation and hence the application of PAH bands as a diagnostic in order to identify the dominant processes contributing to the IR emission from Seyfert's and ULIRGs. We develop a MIR/FIR diagnostic and compare it to known diagnostics, with these also applied to the Galactic sample. This diagnostic is based on the FIR normalized 6.2 um PAH flux and the FIR normalized 6.2 um continuum flux. The Galactic sources form a sequence spanning a range of 3 orders of magnitude, from embedded compact HII regions to exposed PDRs and the (D)ISM. The variation in the 6.2 um PAH/continuum ratio is relative small. Normal and starburst galaxies ressemble exposed PDRs. While Seyfert-2's coincide with the starburst trend, Seyfert-1's are displaced by at least a factor 10 in 6.2 um continuum flux. ULIRGs show a diverse spectral appearance (AGN hot dust continuum, starburst-like or strong dust obscuration in the nucleus). ULIRGs also seems to have more prominent FIR emission than either starburst galaxies or AGNs. We discuss the observed variation in the Galactic sample in view of the evolutionary state and the PAH/dust abundance and the use of PAHs as quantitative tracers of star formation activity. We find that PAHs may be better suited as a tracer of B stars, which dominate the Galactic stellar energy budget, than as a tracer of massive star formation (O stars).
  • We present low resolution mid infrared spectra of 16 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) obtained with the CVF spectroscopy mode of ISOCAM on board the Infrared Space Observatory ISO. Our sample completes previous ISO spectroscopy of ultra- and hyperluminous infrared galaxies towards higher luminosities. The combined samples cover an infrared luminosity range of \~10^{12 -13.1} Lo. For about half of the high luminosity ULIRGs studied here, strong aromatic emission bands suggest starburst dominance. Other spectra are dominated by a strong AGN-related continuum with weak superposed emission features of uncertain nature. An improved method to quantitatively characterize the relative contribution of star formation and AGN activity to the mid-infrared emission of ULIRGs is presented. As dominant source of the bolometric luminosity, starbursts prevail at the lower end and AGNs at the higher end of this range. The transition between mostly starburst and mostly AGN powered occurs at ~10^{12.4}$ to $10^{12.5} Lo, and individual luminous starbursts are found up to ~10^{12.65} Lo.
  • We report the detection of absorption features in the 6-8 micron region superimposed on a featureless mid-infrared continuum in NGC 4418. For several of these features this is the first detection in an external galaxy. We compare the absorption spectrum of NGC 4418 to that of embedded massive protostars and the Galactic centre, and attribute the absorption features to ice grains and to hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains. From the depth of the ice features, the powerful central source responsible for the mid-infrared emission must be deeply enshrouded. Since this emission is warm and originates in a compact region, an AGN must be hiding in the nucleus of NGC 4418.
  • We have obtained ISOPHOT-S low resolution mid-infrared spectra of a sample of 60 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs). We use the strength of the `PAH' mid-infrared features as a discriminator between starburst and AGN activity, and to probe for evolutionary effects. We focus on the fact that observed ratios of PAH features in ULIRGs differ slightly from those in lower luminosity starbursts. We suggest that such PAH ratio changes relate to the conditions in the interstellar medium in these galaxies, and in particular to extinction.
  • We report the first results of a low resolution mid-infrared spectroscopic survey of an unbiased, far-infrared selected sample of 60 ultraluminous infrared galaxies, using ISOPHOT-S on board ISO. We use the ratio of the 7.7um `PAH' emission feature to the local continuum as a discriminator between starburst and AGN activity. About 80% of all the ULIRGs are found to be predominantly powered by star formation but the fraction of AGN powered objects increases with luminosity. Observed ratios of the PAH features in ULIRGs differ slightly from those in lower luminosity starbursts. This can be plausibly explained by the higher extinction and/or different physical conditions in the interstellar medium of ULIRGs. The PAH feature-to-continuum ratio is anticorrelated with the ratio of feature-free 5.9um continuum to the IRAS 60um continuum, confirming suggestions that strong mid-IR continuum is a prime AGN signature. The location of starburst-dominated ULIRGs in such a diagram is consistent with previous ISO-SWS spectroscopy which implies significant extinction even in the mid-infrared. We have searched for indications that ULIRGs which are advanced mergers might be more AGN-like, as postulated by the classical evolutionary scenario. No such trend has been found amongst those objects for which near infrared images are available to assess their likely merger status.
  • We report the detection of faint emission in the high-excitation [OIV] 25.90um line in a number of starburst galaxies, from observations obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board ISO. Further observations of M82 spatially resolve the [OIV] emitting region. Detection of this line in starbursts is surprising since it is not produced in measurable quantities in HII regions around hot main-sequence stars, the dominant energy source of starburst galaxies. We discuss various models for the formation of this line. [OIV] that is spatially resolved by ISO cannot originate in a weak AGN and must be due to very hot stars or ionizing shocks related to the starburst activity. For low-excitation starbursts like M82, shocks are the most plausible source of [OIV] emission.
  • We present an ISO SWS and ISOPHOT-S, mid-infrared spectroscopic survey of 15 ultra-luminous IRAS galaxies. We combine the survey results with a detailed case study, based on near-IR and mm imaging spectroscopy, of one of the sample galaxies (UGC 5101). We compare the near- and mid-IR characteristics of these ultra-luminous galaxies to ISO and literature data of thirty starburst and active galactic nuclei (AGN), template galaxies. We find that 1) 70-80% of the ultra-luminous IRAS galaxies in our sample are predominantly powered by recently formed massive stars. 20-30% are powered by a central AGN. These conclusions are based on a new infrared 'diagnostic diagram' involving the ratio of high to low excitation mid-IR emission lines on the one hand, and on the strength of the 7.7um PAH feature on the other hand. 2) at least half of the sources probably have simultaneously an active nucleus and starburst activity in a 1-2 kpc diameter circum-nuclear disk/ring. 3) the mid-infrared emitting regions are highly obscured. After correction for these extinctions, we estimate that the star forming regions in ULIRGs have ages between 10^7 and 10^8 years, similar to but somewhat larger than those found in lower luminosity starburst galaxies. 4) in the sample we have studied there is no obvious trend for the AGN component to dominate in the most compact, and thus most advanced mergers. Instead, at any given time during the merger evolution, the time dependent compression of the circum-nuclear interstellar gas, the accretion rate onto the central black hole and the associated radiation efficiency may determine whether star formation or AGN activity dominates the luminosity of the system.