• Waves propagating through a weakly scattering random medium show a pronounced branching of the flow accompanied by the formation of freak waves, i.e., extremely intense waves. Theory predicts that this strong fluctuation regime is accompanied by its own fundamental length scale of transport in random media, parametrically different from the mean free path or the localization length. We show numerically how the scintillation index can be used to assess the scaling behavior of the branching length. We report the experimental observation of this scaling using microwave transport experiments in quasi-two-dimensional resonators with randomly distributed weak scatterers. Remarkably, the scaling range extends much further than expected from random caustics statistics.
  • A realisation of a periodically driven microwave system is presented. The principal element of the scheme is a variable capacity, i.e. a varicap, introduced as an element of the resonant circuit. Sideband structures corresponding to different driving signals, have been measured experimentally. In the linear regime we observed sideband structures with specific shapes. The main peculiarities of these shapes can be explained within a semiclassical approximation. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical expectations has been found.
  • Symmetry reduced three-disk and five-disk systems are studied in a microwave setup. Using harmonic inversion the distribution of the imaginary parts of the resonances is determined. With increasing opening of the systems, a spectral gap is observed for thick as well as for thin repellers and for the latter case it is compared with the known topological pressure bounds. The maxima of the distributions are found to coincide for a large range of the distance to radius parameter with half of the classical escape rate. This confirms theoretical predictions based on rigorous mathematical analysis for the spectral gap and on numerical experiments for the maxima of the distributions.
  • We present microwave experiments on the symmetry reduced 5-disk billiard studying the transition from a closed to an open system. The measured microwave reflection signal is analyzed by means of the harmonic inversion and the counting function of the resulting resonances is studied. For the closed system this counting function shows the Weyl asymptotic with a leading exponent equal to 2. By opening the system successively this exponent decreases smoothly to an non-integer value. For the open systems the extraction of resonances by the harmonic inversion becomes more challenging and the arising difficulties are discussed. The results can be interpreted as a first experimental indication for the fractal Weyl conjecture for resonances.
  • A microwave setup for mode-resolved transport measurement in quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) structures is presented. We will demonstrate a technique for direct measurement of the Green's function of the system. With its help we will investigate quasi-1D structures with various types of disorder. We will focus on stratified structures, i.e., structures that are homogeneous perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. In this case the interaction between different channels is absent, so wave propagation occurs individually in each open channel. We will apply analytical results developed in the theory of one-dimensional (1D) disordered models in order to explain main features of the quasi-1D transport. The main focus will be selective transport due to long-range correlations in the disorder. In our setup, we can intentionally introduce correlations by changing the positions of periodically spaced brass bars of finite thickness. Because of the equivalence of the stationary Schr\"odinger equation and the Helmholtz equation, the result can be directly applied to selective electron transport in nanowires, nanostripes, and superlattices.
  • We present a microwave realization of finite tight-binding graphene-like structures. The structures are realized using discs with a high index of refraction. The discs are placed on a metallic surface while a second surface is adjusted atop the discs, such that the waves coupling the discs in the air are evanescent, leading to the tight-binding behavior. In reflection measurements the Dirac point and a linear increase close to the Dirac point is observed, if the measurement is performed inside the sample. Resonances due to edge states are found close to the Dirac point if the measurements are performed at the zigzag-edge or at the corner in case of a broken benzene ring.
  • Microwave transport experiments have been performed in a quasi-two-dimensional resonator with randomly distributed scatterers, each mimicking an $r^{-2}$ repulsive potential. Analysis of both stationary wave fields and transient transport shows large deviations from Rayleigh's law for the wave height distribution, which can only partially be described by existing multiple-scattering theories. At high frequencies, the flow shows branching structures similar to those observed previously in stationary imaging of electron flow. Semiclassical simulations confirm that caustics in the ray dynamics are likely to be responsible for the observed structures. Particular conspicuous features observed in the stationary patterns are "hot spots" with intensities far beyond those expected in a random wave field. Reinterpreting the flow patterns as ocean waves in the presence of spatially varying currents or depth variations in the sea floor, the branches and hot spots lead to enhanced frequency of freak or rogue wave formation in these regions.
  • We study the effects of random positional disorder in the transmission of waves in a 1D Kronig-Penny model. For weak disorder we derive an analytical expression for the localization length and relate it to the transmission coefficient for finite samples. The obtained results describe very well the experimental frequency dependence of the transmission in a microwave realization of the model. Our results can be applied both to photonic crystals and semiconductor super lattices.
  • This article reports on a joint theoretical and experimental study of the Pauli quantum-mechanical stress tensor $T_{\alpha \beta}(x,y)$ for open two-dimensional chaotic billiards. In the case of a finite current flow through the system the interior wave function is expressed as $\psi = u+iv$. With the assumption that $u$ and $v$ are Gaussian random fields we derive analytic expressions for the statistical distributions for the quantum stress tensor components $T_{\alpha \beta}$. The Gaussian random field model is tested for a Sinai billiard with two opposite leads by analyzing the scattering wave functions obtained numerically from the corresponding Schroedinger equation. Two-dimensional quantum billiards may be emulated from planar microwave analogues. Hence we report on microwave measurements for an open 2D cavity and how the quantum stress tensor analogue is extracted from the recorded electric field. The agreement with the theoretical predictions for the distributions for $T_{\alpha \beta}(x,y)$ is quite satisfactory for small net currents. However, a distinct difference between experiments and theory is observed at higher net flow, which could be explained using a Gaussian random field, where the net current was taken into account by an additional plane wave with a preferential direction and amplitude.
  • From the measurement of a reflection spectrum of an open microwave cavity the poles of the scattering matrix in the complex plane have been determined. The resonances have been extracted by means of the harmonic inversion method. By this it became possible to resolve the resonances in a regime where the line widths exceed the mean level spacing up to a factor of 10, a value inaccessible in experiments up to now. The obtained experimental distributions of line widths were found to be in perfect agreement with predictions from random matrix theory when wall absorption and fluctuations caused by couplings to additional channels are considered.
  • From a reflection measurement in a rectangular microwave billiard with randomly distributed scatterers the scattering and the ordinary fidelity was studied. The position of one of the scatterers is the perturbation parameter. Such perturbations can be considered as {\em local} since wave functions are influenced only locally, in contrast to, e. g., the situation where the fidelity decay is caused by the shift of one billiard wall. Using the random-plane-wave conjecture, an analytic expression for the fidelity decay due to the shift of one scatterer has been obtained, yielding an algebraic $1/t$ decay for long times. A perfect agreement between experiment and theory has been found, including a predicted scaling behavior concerning the dependence of the fidelity decay on the shift distance. The only free parameter has been determined independently from the variance of the level velocities.
  • We study the effects of single impurities on the transmission in microwave realizations of the photonic Kronig-Penney model, consisting of arrays of Teflon pieces alternating with air spacings in a microwave guide. As only the first propagating mode is considered, the system is essentially one dimensional obeying the Helmholtz equation. We derive analytical closed form expressions from which the band structure, frequency of defect modes, and band profiles can be determined. These agree very well with experimental data for all types of single defects considered (e.g. interstitial, substitutional) and shows that our experimental set-up serves to explore some of the phenomena occurring in more sophisticated experiments. Conversely, based on the understanding provided by our formulas, information about the unknown impurity can be determined by simply observing certain features in the experimental data for the transmission. Further, our results are directly applicable to the closely related quantum 1D Kronig-Penney model.
  • The theoretical interpretation of measurements of "wavefunctions" and spectra in electromagnetic cavities excited by antennas is considered. Assuming that the characteristic wavelength of the field inside the cavity is much larger than the radius of the antenna, we describe antennas as "point-like perturbations". This approach strongly simplifies the problem reducing the whole information on the antenna to four effective constants. In the framework of this approach we overcame the divergency of series of the phenomenological scattering theory and justify assumptions lying at the heart of "wavefunction measurements". This selfconsistent approach allowed us to go beyond the one-pole approximation, in particular, to treat the experiments with degenerated states. The central idea of the approach is to introduce ``renormalized'' Green function, which contains the information on boundary reflections and has no singularity inside the cavity.
  • Nodal domains are studied both for real $\psi_R$ and imaginary part $\psi_I$ of the wavefunctions of an open microwave cavity and found to show the same behavior as wavefunctions in closed billiards. In addition we investigate the variation of the number of nodal domains and the signed area correlation by changing the global phase $\phi_g$ according to $\psi_R+i\psi_I=e^{i\phi_g}(\psi_R'+i\psi_I')$. This variation can be qualitatively, and the correlation quantitatively explained in terms of the phase rigidity characterising the openness of the billiard.
  • Symmetries as well as other special conditions can cause anomalous slowing down of fidelity decay. These situations will be characterized, and a family of random matrix models to emulate them generically presented. An analytic solution based on exponentiated linear response will be given. For one representative case the exact solution is obtained from a supersymmetric calculation. The results agree well with dynamical calculations for a kicked top.
  • We review recent research on the transport properties of classical waves through chaotic systems with special emphasis on microwaves and sound waves. Inasmuch as these experiments use antennas or transducers to couple waves into or out of the systems, scattering theory has to be applied for a quantitative interpretation of the measurements. Most experiments concentrate on tests of predictions from random matrix theory and the random plane wave approximation. In all studied examples a quantitative agreement between experiment and theory is achieved. To this end it is necessary, however, to take absorption and imperfect coupling into account, concepts that were ignored in most previous theoretical investigations. Classical phase space signatures of scattering are being examined in a small number of experiments.
  • The scattering matrix was measured for a flat microwave cavity with classically chaotic dynamics. The system can be perturbed by small changes of the geometry. We define the "scattering fidelity" in terms of parametric correlation functions of scattering matrix elements. In chaotic systems and for weak coupling the scattering fidelity approaches the fidelity of the closed system. Without free parameters the experimental results agree with random matrix theory in a wide range of perturbation strengths, reaching from the perturbative to the Fermi golden rule regime.
  • Using supersymmetry techniques analytical expressions for the average of the fidelity amplitude f_epsilon(tau)=< psi(0)| exp(2 pi i H_epsilon tau) exp(-2 pi i H_0 tau)| psi(0) > are obtained, where H_epsilon=H_0+(sqrt{epsilon}/(2 pi) )*V, and H_0 and H_epsilon are taken from the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) or the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE), respectively. As long as the perturbation strength is small compared to the mean level spacing, a Gaussian decay of the fidelity amplitude is observed, whereas for stronger perturbations a change to a single-exponential decay takes place, in accordance with results from literature. Close to the Heisenberg time tau=1, however, a partial revival of the fidelity is found, which hitherto remained unnoticed. Random matrix simulations have been performed for the three Gaussian ensembles. For the case of the GOE and the GUE they are in perfect agreement with the analytical results.
  • Using supersymmetry calculations and random matrix simulations, we studied the decay of the average of the fidelity amplitude f_epsilon(tau)=<psi(0)| exp(2 pi i H_epsilon tau) exp(-2 pi i H_0 tau) |psi(0)>, where H_epsilon differs from H_0 by a slight perturbation characterized by the parameter epsilon. For strong perturbations a recovery of f_epsilon(tau) at the Heisenberg time tau=1 is found. It is most pronounced for the Gaussian symplectic ensemble, and least for the Gaussian orthogonal one. Using Dyson's Brownian motion model for an eigenvalue crystal, the recovery is interpreted in terms of a spectral analogue of the Debye-Waller factor known from solid state physics, describing the decrease of X-ray and neutron diffraction peaks with temperature due to lattice vibrations.
  • The concept of fidelity decay is discussed from the point of view of the scattering matrix, and the scattering fidelity is introduced as the parametric cross-correlation of a given S-matrix element, taken in the time domain, normalized by the corresponding autocorrelation function. We show that for chaotic systems, this quantity represents the usual fidelity amplitude, if appropriate ensemble and/or energy averages are taken. We present a microwave experiment where the scattering fidelity is measured for an ensemble of chaotic systems. The results are in excellent agreement with random matrix theory for the standard fidelity amplitude. The only parameter, namely the perturbation strength could be determined independently from level dynamics of the system, thus providing a parameter free agreement between theory and experiment.
  • We consider waveguides formed by single or multiple two-dimensional chaotic cavities connected to leads. The cavities are chaotic in the sense that the ray (or equivalently, classical particle) dynamics within them is chaotic. Geometrical parameters are chosen to produce a mixed phase space (chaotic regions surrounding islands of stability where motion is regular). Incoming rays (or particles) cannot penetrate into these islands but incoming plane waves dynamically tunnel into them at a certain discrete set of frequencies (energies). The support of the corresponding quasi-bound states is along the trajectories of periodic orbits trapped within the cavity. We take advantage of this difference in the ray/wave behavior to demonstrate how chaotic waveguides can be used to design beam splitters and microlasers. We also present some preliminary experimental results in a microwave realization of such chaotic waveguide.
  • It was recently conjectured that 1/f noise is a fundamental characteristic of spectral fluctuations in chaotic quantum systems. In this Letter we show that the level fluctuations of experimental realizations of the Sinai billiard exhibit {\em 1/f} noise, corroborating the conjecture. Assuming that the statistical properties of these systems are those of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE), we compare the experimental results with the universal behavior predicted in the random matrix framework, and find an excellent agreement. The deviations from this behavior observed at low frequencies can be easily explained with the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. In conclusion, it is shown that the main features of the conjecture are affected neither by non-universal properties due to the underlying classical dynamics nor by the uncertainties of the experimental setup.
  • A tunable microwave scattering device is presented which allows the controlled variation of Fano line shape parameters in transmission through quantum billiards. We observe a non-monotonic evolution of resonance parameters that is explained in terms of interacting resonances. The dissipation of radiation in the cavity walls leads to decoherence and thus to a modification of the Fano profile. We show that the imaginary part of the complex Fano q-parameter allows to determine the absorption constant of the cavity. Our theoretical results demonstrate further that the two decohering mechanisms, dephasing and dissipation, are equivalent in terms of their effect on the evolution of Fano resonance lineshapes.
  • We quantify the presence of direct processes in the S-matrix of chaotic microwave cavities with absorption in the one-channel case. To this end the full distribution P_S(S) of the S-matrix, i.e. S=\sqrt{R}e^{i\theta}, is studied in cavities with time-reversal symmetry for different antenna coupling strengths T_a or direct processes. The experimental results are compared with random-matrix calculations and with numerical simulations based on the Heidelberg approach including absorption. The theoretical result is a generalization of the Poisson kernel. The experimental and the numerical distributions are in excellent agreement with random-matrix predictions for all cases.
  • From random matrix theory it is known that for special values of the coupling constant the Calogero-Moser (CM) equation system is nothing but the radial part of a generalized harmonic oscillator Schroedinger equation. This allows an immediate construction of the solutions by means of a Rodriguez relation. The results are easily generalized to arbitrary values of the coupling constant. By this the CM equations become nearly trivial. As an application an expansion for <exp[i(XY)]> in terms of eigenfunctions of the CM equation system is obtained, where X and Y are matrices taken from one of the Gaussian ensembles, and the brackets denote an average over the angular variables.