• Topological Dirac and Weyl semimetals not only host quasiparticles analogous to the elementary fermionic particles in high-energy physics, but also have nontrivial band topology manifested by exotic Fermi arcs on the surface. Recent advances suggest new types of topological semimetals, in which spatial symmetries protect gapless electronic excitations without high-energy analogy. Here we observe triply-degenerate nodal points (TPs) near the Fermi level of WC, in which the low-energy quasiparticles are described as three-component fermions distinct from Dirac and Weyl fermions. We further observe the surface states whose constant energy contours are pairs of Fermi arcs connecting the surface projection of the TPs, proving the nontrivial topology of the newly identified semimetal state.
  • We report a polarized Raman scattering study of non-symmorphic topological insulator KHgSb with hourglass-like electronic dispersion. Supported by theoretical calculations, we show that the lattice of the previously assigned space group $P6_3/mmc$ (No. 194) is unstable in KHgSb. While we observe one of two calculated Raman active E$_{2g}$ phonons of space group $P6_3/mmc$ at room temperature, an additional A$_{1g}$ peak appears at 99.5 ~cm$^{-1}$ upon cooling below $T^*$ = 150 K, which suggests a lattice distortion. Several weak peaks associated with two-phonon excitations emerge with this lattice instability. We also show that the sample is very sensitive to high temperature and high laser power, conditions under which it quickly decomposes, leading to the formation of Sb. Our first-principles calculations indicate that space group $P6_3mc$ (No. 186), corresponding to a vertical displacement of the Sb atoms with respect to the Hg atoms that breaks the inversion symmetry, is lower in energy than the presumed $P6_3/mmc$ structure and preserves the glide plane symmetry necessary to the formation of hourglass fermions.
  • We discover a pair of spin-polarized surface bands on the (111) face of grey arsenic by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In the occupied side, the pair resembles typical nearly-free-electron Shockley states observed on noble-metal surfaces. However, pump-probe ARPES reveals that the spin-polarized pair traverses the bulk band gap and that the crossing of the pair at $\bar\Gamma$ is topologically unavoidable. First-principles calculations well reproduce the bands and their non-trivial topology; the calculations also support that the surface states are of Shockley type because they arise from a band inversion caused by crystal field. The results provide compelling evidence that topological Shockley states are realized on As(111).
  • Condensed matter systems can host quasiparticle excitations that are analogues to elementary particles such as Majorana, Weyl, and Dirac fermions. Recent advances in band theory have expanded the classification of fermions in crystals, and revealed crystal symmetry-protected electron excitations that have no high-energy counterparts. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate the existence of a triply degenerate point in the electronic structure of MoP crystal, where the quasiparticle excitations are beyond the Majorana-Weyl-Dirac classification. Furthermore, we observe pairs of Weyl points in the bulk electronic structure coexisting with the 'new fermions', thus introducing a platform for studying the interplay between different types of fermions.
  • By using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we reveal that the topmost unit cell of ZrSnTe crystal hosts two-dimensional (2D) electronic bands of topological insulator (TI) state, though such a TI state is defined with a curved Fermi level instead of a global band gap. Furthermore, we find that by modifying the dangling bonds on the surface through hydrogenation, this 2D band structure can be manipulated so that the expected global energy gap is most likely to be realized. This facilitates the practical applications of 2D TI in heterostructural devices and those with surface decoration and coverage. Since ZrSnTe belongs to a large family of compounds having the similar crystal and band structures, our findings shed light on identifying more 2D TI candidates and superconductor-TI heterojunctions supporting topological superconductors.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) host novel states of quantum matter, distinguished from trivial insulators by the presence of nontrivial conducting boundary states connecting the valence and conduction bulk bands. Up to date, all the TIs discovered experimentally rely on the presence of either time reversal or symmorphic mirror symmetry to protect massless Dirac-like boundary states. Very recently, it has been theoretically proposed that several materials are a new type of TIs protected by nonsymmorphic symmetry, where glide-mirror can protect novel exotic surface fermions with hourglass-shaped dispersion. However, an experimental confirmation of such new nonsymmorphic TI (NSTI) is still missing. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we reveal that such hourglass topology exists on the (010) surface of crystalline KHgSb while the (001) surface has no boundary state, which is fully consistent with first-principles calculations. We thus experimentally demonstrate that KHgSb is a NSTI hosting hourglass fermions. By expanding the classification of topological insulators, this discovery opens a new direction in the research of nonsymmorphic topological properties of materials.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) with a large bulk band-gap are promising for experimental studies of the quantum spin Hall effect and for spintronic device applications. Despite considerable theoretical efforts in predicting large-gap 2D TI candidates, only few of them have been experimentally verified. Here, by combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we reveal that the top monolayer of ZrTe5 crystals hosts a large band gap of ~100 meV on the surface and a finite constant density-of-states within the gap at the step edge. Our first-principles calculations confirm the topologically nontrivial nature of the edge states. These results demonstrate that the top monolayer of ZrTe5 crystals is a large-gap 2D TI suitable for topotronic applications at high temperature.
  • The concept of a topological Kondo insulator (TKI) has been brought forward as a new class of topological insulators in which non-trivial surface states reside in the bulk Kondo band gap at low temperature due to the strong spin-orbit coupling [1-3]. In contrast to other three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (e.g. Bi2Se3), a TKI is truly insulating in the bulk [4]. Furthermore, strong electron correlations are present in the system, which may interact with the novel topological phase. Applying spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) to the Kondo insulator SmB6, a promising TKI candidate, we reveal that the surface states of SmB6 are spin polarized, and the spin is locked to the crystal momentum. Counter-propagating states (i.e. at k and -k) have opposite spin polarizations protected by time-reversal symmetry. Together with the odd number of Fermi surfaces of surface states between the 4 time-reversal invariant momenta in the surface Brillouin zone [5], these findings prove, for the first time, that SmB6 can host non-trivial topological surface states in a full insulating gap in the bulk stemming from the Kondo effect. Hence our experimental results establish that SmB6 is the first realization of a 3D TKI. It can also serve as an ideal platform for the systematic study of the interplay between novel topological quantum states with emergent effects and competing order induced by strongly correlated electrons.