• With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading ultraviolet emission indicates a high mass ($\approx0.03$ solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction ($Y_{e}\approx0.27$). Combined with the X-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of $\approx 30^{\circ}$ away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultra-relativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).
  • Swift J1734.5-3027 is a hard X-ray transient discovered by Swift while undergoing an outburst in September 2013. Archival observations showed that this source underwent a previous episode of enhanced X-ray activity in May-June 2013. In this paper we report on the analysis of all X-ray data collected during the outburst in September 2013, the first that could be intensively followed-up by several X-ray facilities. Our data-set includes INTEGRAL, Swift, and XMM-Newton observations. From the timing and spectral analysis of these observations, we show that a long type-I X-ray burst took place during the source outburst, making Swift J1734.5-3027 a new member of the class of bursting neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. The burst lasted for about 1.9 ks and reached a peak flux of (6.0$\pm$1.8)$\times$10$^{-8}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the 0.5-100 keV energy range. The estimated burst fluence in the same energy range is (1.10$\pm$0.10)$\times$10$^{-5}$ erg cm$^{-2}$. By assuming that a photospheric radius expansion took place during the first $\sim$200 s of the burst and that the accreted material was predominantly composed by He, we derived a distance to the source of 7.2$\pm$1.5 kpc.
  • GRB 110918A is the brightest long GRB detected by Konus-WIND during its 19 years of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final IPN localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderare $E_{peak}$ of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z=0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release $E_{iso}=(2.1\pm0.1)\times10^{54}$ erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity $L_{iso}=(4.7\pm0.2)\times10^{54}$erg s$^{-1}$. A tail of the soft gamma-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. Swift/XRT and Swift/UVOT observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and ISM-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.7-3.4 deg results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of $z\sim7.5$ for Konus-WIND, and $z\sim12$ for Swift/BAT, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early Universe.
  • MAXI J1659-152 was discovered on 2010 September 25 as a new X-ray transient, initially identified as a gamma-ray burst, but was later shown to be a new X-ray binary with a black hole as the most likely compact object. Dips in the X-ray light curves have revealed that MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest period black hole candidate identified to date. Here we present the results of a large observing campaign at radio, sub-millimeter, near-infrared (nIR), optical and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. We have combined this very rich data set with the available X-ray observations to compile a broadband picture of the evolution of this outburst. We have performed broadband spectral modeling, demonstrating the presence of a spectral break at radio frequencies and a relationship between the radio spectrum and X-ray states. Also, we have determined physical parameters of the accretion disk and put them into context with respect to the other parameters of the binary system. Finally, we have investigated the radio-X-ray and nIR/optical/UV-X-ray correlations up to ~3 years after the outburst onset to examine the link between the jet and the accretion disk, and found that there is no significant jet contribution to the nIR emission when the source is in the soft or intermediate X-ray spectral state, consistent with our detection of the jet break at radio frequencies during these states.
  • We report on the detection and follow-up high cadence monitoring observations of MAXI J1659-152, a bright Galactic X-ray binary transient with a likely black-hole accretor, by Swift over a 27 day period after its initial outburst detection. MAXI J1659-152 was discovered almost simultaneously by Swift and MAXI on 2010 Sept 25, and was monitored intensively from the early stages of the outburst through the rise to a brightness of ~0.5 Crab by the Swift XRT, UVOT, and BAT. We present temporal and spectral analysis of the Swift observations. The broadband light-curves show variability characteristic of black-hole candidate transients. We present the evolution of thermal and non-thermal components of the 0.5-150 keV combined X-ray spectra during the outburst. MAXI J1659-152 displays accretion state changes typically associated with black-hole binaries, transitioning from its initial detection in the Hard State, to the Steep Power-Law State, followed by a slow evolution towards the Thermal State, signified by an increasingly dominant thermal component associated with the accretion disk, although this state change did not complete before Swift observations ended. We observe an anti-correlation between the increasing temperature and decreasing radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk, suggesting that the inner edge of the accretion disk in-falls towards the black-hole as the disk temperature increases. We observed significant evolution in the absorption column during the initial rise of the outburst, with the absorption almost doubling, suggestive of the presence of an evolving wind from the accretion disk. We detect quasi- periodic oscillations that evolve with the outburst, as well as irregular shaped dips that recur with a period of 2.42\pm0.09 hours, strongly suggesting an orbital period that would make MAXI J1659-152 the shortest period black-hole binary yet known.
  • On 2009 June 5, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope triggered on two short, and relatively dim bursts with spectral properties similar to Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts. Independent localizations of the bursts by triangulation with the Konus-RF and with the Swift satellite, confirmed their origin from the same, previously unknown, source. The subsequent discovery of X-ray pulsations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), confirmed the magnetar nature of the new source, SGR J0418+5729. We describe here the Fermi/GBM observations, the discovery and the localization of this new SGR, and our infrared and Chandra X-ray observations. We also present a detailed temporal and spectral study of the two GBM bursts. SGR J0418+5729 is the second source discovered in the same region of the sky in the last year, the other one being SGR J0501+4516. Both sources lie in the direction of the galactic anti-center and presumably at the nearby distance of ~2 kpc (assuming they reside in the Perseus arm of our galaxy). The near-threshold GBM detection of bursts from SGR J0418+5729 suggests that there may be more such dim SGRs throughout our galaxy, possibly exceeding the population of bright SGRs. Finally, using sample statistics, we conclude that the implications of the new SGR discovery on the number of observable active magnetars in our galaxy at any given time is <10, in agreement with our earlier estimates.
  • The black hole X-ray transient, XTE J1118+480, has now twice been observed in outburst - 2000 and 2005 - and on both occasions remained in the low/hard X-ray spectral state. Here we present radio, infrared, optical, soft X-ray and hard X-ray observations of the more recent outburst. We find that the lightcurves have very different morphologies compared with the 2000 event and the optical decay is delayed relative to the X-ray/radio. We attribute this lesser degree of correlation to contributions of emission from multiple components, in particular the jet and accretion disc. Whereas the jet seemed to dominate the broadband spectrum in 2000, in 2005 the accretion disc seems to be more prominent and we use an analysis of the lightcurves and spectra to distinguish between the jet and disc emission. There also appears to be an optically thin component to the radio emission in the 2005 data, possibly associated with multiple ejection events and decaying as the outburst proceeds. These results add to the discussion that the term "low/hard state'" covers a wider range of properties than previously thought, if it is to account for XTE J1118+480 during these two outbursts.
  • Swift has allowed the possibility to give Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), the new class of High Mass X-ray Binaries discovered by INTEGRAL, non serendipitous attention throughout all phases of their life. We present our results based on the first year of intense Swift monitoring of four SFXTs, IGR J16479-4514, XTE J1739-302, IGR J17544-2619 and AX J1841.0-0536. We obtain the first assessment of how long each source spends in each state using a systematic monitoring with a sensitive instrument. The duty-cycle of inactivity is 17, 28, 39, 55% (5% uncertainty), for IGR J16479-4514, AX J1841.0-0536, XTE J1739-302, and IGR J17544-2619, respectively, so that true quiescence is a rare state. This demonstrates that these transients accrete matter throughout their life at different rates. AX J1841.0-0536 is the only source which has not undergone a bright outburst during our campaign. Although individual sources behave somewhat differently, common X-ray characteristics of this class are emerging such as outburst lengths well in excess of hours, with a multiple peaked structure. A high dynamic range (including bright outbursts) of 4 orders of magnitude has been observed. We performed out-of-outburst intensity-based spectroscopy. Spectral fits with an absorbed blackbody always result in blackbody radii of a few hundred meters, consistent with being emitted from a small portion of the neutron star surface, very likely the neutron star polar caps. We also present the UVOT data of these sources. (Abridged)
  • We describe our monitoring strategy which best exploits the sensitivity and flexibility of Swift to study the long-term behaviour of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs). We present observations of the recent outbursts from two objects of this class. IGR J16479-4514, underwent an outburst on 2008 March 19, reaching a peak luminosity of about 6E37 erg/s (0.5-100keV; at a distance of 4.9 kpc). We obtained a simultaneous broad-band spectrum (0.3-100 keV), the first for the SFXT class, which is fit with a heavily absorbed (column density 5E22 cm^-2) hard power-law with a high energy cut-off at about 7keV. This spectrum shows properties similar to the ones of accreting pulsars, although no X-ray pulsations were found. IGR J11215-5952, one of the only two periodic SFXT known to date, was observed with Swift several times, first with an intense 23-day long monitoring campaign around the 2007 February 9 outburst; then with a 26-day long monitoring around the unexpected July 24 outburst; finally with a deep exposure during the 2008 June 16 outburst. We present the whole dataset, which also includes observations which allowed us to firmly establish the outburst period at P~165 days. Thanks to our combined observations common characteristics to this class of objects are emerging, i.e., outburst lengths well in excess of hours, often with a multiple peaked structure, dynamic range ~3 orders of magnitude, and periodicities are starting to be found.
  • IGR J08408-4503 is a supergiant fast X-ray transient discovered in 2006 with a confirmed association with a O8.5Ib(f) supergiant star, HD 74194. We report on the analysis of two outbursts caught by Swift/BAT on 2006 October 4 and 2008 July 5, and followed up at softer energies with Swift/XRT. The 2008 XRT light curve shows a multiple-peaked structure with an initial bright flare that reached a flux of ~1E-9 erg/cm2/s (2-10 keV), followed by two equally bright flares within 75 ks. The spectral characteristics of the flares differ dramatically, with most of the difference, as derived via time-resolved spectroscopy, being due to absorbing column variations. We observe a gradual decrease of the NH, derived with a fit using absorbed power law model, as time passes. We interpret these NH variations as due to an ionization effect produced by the first flare, resulting in a significant decrease in the measured column density towards the source. The durations of the flares, as well as the times of the outbursts suggest that the orbital period is ~35 days, if the flaring activity is interpreted within the framework of the Sidoli et al 2007 model with the outbursts triggered by the neutron star passage inside an equatorial wind inclined with respect to the orbital plane.
  • The robotic ROTSE-III telescope network detected prompt optical emission contemporaneous with the gamma-ray emission of Swift events GRB051109A and GRB051111. Both datasets have continuous coverage at high signal-to-noise levels from the prompt phase onwards, thus the early observations are readily compared to the Swift XRT and BAT high energy detections. In both cases, the optical afterglow is established, declining steadily during the prompt emission. For GRB051111, there is evidence of an excess optical component during the prompt emission. The component is consistent with the flux spectrally extrapolated from the gamma-rays, using the gamma-ray spectral index. A compilation of spectral information from previous prompt detections shows that such a component is unusual. The existence of two prompt optical components - one connected to the high-energy emission, the other to separate afterglow flux, as indicated in GRB051111 - is not compatible with a simple ``external-external'' shock model for the GRB and its afterglow.
  • We report the first detection of an optical afterglow of a GRB (060108) that would have been classified as 'dark' in the absence of deep, rapid ground-based optical imaging with the 2-m robotic Faulkes Telesscope (FTN). Our multiwavelength analysis reveals an X-ray light curve typical of many Swift long GRBs (3-segments plus flare). Its optical afterglow, however, was already fainter than the detection limit of the UVOT within 100s of the burst. Optical imaging in BVRi' filters with the FTN began 2.75 minutes after the burst and resulted in the detection of the optical afterglow at 5.3 minutes, with a UKIRT K-band identification at ~45 mins. R and i'-band light curves are consistent with a single power law decay in flux, F(t) prop t^-a where a=0.43+/-0.08, or a 2-segment light curve with a steep decay a_1 <0.88, flattening to a_2 ~ 0.31, with evidence for rebrightening at i' band. Deep VLT R-band imaging at ~12 days reveals a faint, extended object (R ~23.5 mag) at the location of the afterglow. Although the brightness is compatible with the extrapolation of the a_2 slow decay, significant flux is likely due to a host galaxy. This implies that the optical light curve had a break before 12 days, akin to what observed in the X-rays. We derive a maximum photometric redshift z<3.2 for GRB 060108 and a best-fitting optical-to-X-ray SED at 1000 s after the burst consistent with a power law with index beta_OX = 0.54 and a small amount of extinction. The unambiguous detection at B-band and the derived photometric redshift rule out a high redshift as the reason for the optical faintness of GRB 060108. Instead, the hard opt/X-ray spectral index confirms it as one of the optically-darkest bursts detected and with modest host extinction explains the UVOT non-detection (abridged).
  • We present the results of a series of Swift and quasi simultaneous ground-based infra-red observations of the blazar 3C 454.3 carried out in April-May 2005 when the source was 10 to 30 times brighter than previously observed. We found 3C 454.3 to be very bright and variable at all frequencies covered by our instrumentation. The broad-band Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) shows the usual two-bump shape (in nu-nu f(nu) space) with the Infra-red, optical and UV data sampling the declining part of the synchrotron emission that, even during this extremely large outburst, had its maximum in the far-infrared. The X-ray spectral data from the XRT and BAT instruments are flat and due to inverse Compton emission. The remarkable SED observed implies that at the time of the Swift pointings 3C 454.3 was one of the brightest objects in the extragalactic sky with a gamma-ray emission similar or brighter than that of 3C 279 when observed in a high state by EGRET. Time variability in the optical-UV flux is very different from that in the X-ray data: while the first component varied by about a factor two within a single exposure, but remained approximately constant between different observations, the inverse Compton component did not vary on short time-scales but changed by more than a factor of 3 between observations separated by a few days. This different dynamical behaviour illustrates the need to collect simultaneous multi-frequency data over a wide range of time-scales to fully constrain physical parameters in blazars.
  • The short/hard GRB051210 was detected and located by the Swift-BAT instrument and rapidly pointed towards by the narrow field instrumens. The XRT was able to observe a bright X-ray afterglow, one of the few ever observed for this class of bursts. We present the analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of this event The BAT spectrum is a power-law with photon index 1.1 +/-0.3. The X-ray light curve decays with slope 2.58+/-0.11 and shows a small flare in the early phases. The spectrum can be described with a power law with photon index 1.54+/-0.16 and absorption (7.5 (-3.2, +4.3)*10^20 cm-2 We find that the X-ray emission is consistent with the hypothesis that we are observing the curvature effect of a GRB occurred in a low density medium, with no detectable afterglow. We estimate the density of the circumburst medium to be lower than 4*10^-3 cm^-3. We also discuss different hypothesis on the possible origin of the flare.
  • We analyze the Swift XRT light curves and spectra of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which the redshift has been measured. The sample consists of seven GRBs. The soft X-ray light curves of all these GRBs are separated into at least two morphological classes: 1) those starting off with a very steep light curve decay and 2) those showing a rather mild initial decay. This initial decay is followed by a flattening and by a further steepening. During these transitions the soft X-ray spectrum of these GRBs remains constant within the observational errors (except for one case, GRB050319). For the first time we are able to exploit the early light curve of GRB afterglows in the comoving frame. Besides the temporal and spectral behavior we find that the energy of the afterglow emitted in the (rest frame) time interval 20-200 s and 1300-12600 s after the trigger correlates with the mean energy of the prompt emission, hinting at a close link between the two. Averaging over the bursts that have a rather well sampled light curve and starting immediately after the prompt phase, the energy emitted in the soft X-rays is about 3% of the energy emitted during the prompt phase, except for GRB050315, where the soft X-ray emission is as high as 14% of the prompt emission.
  • The prompt optical emission that arrives with gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with the surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium.