• We present weak gravitational lensing analysis of 22 high-redshift (z >~1) clusters based on Hubble Space Telescope images. Most clusters in our sample provide significant lensing signals and are well detected in their reconstructed two-dimensional mass maps. Combining the current results and our previous weak-lensing studies of five other high-z clusters, we compare gravitational lensing masses of these clusters with other observables. We revisit the question whether the presence of the most massive clusters in our sample is in tension with the current LambdaCDM structure formation paradigm. We find that the lensing masses are tightly correlated with the gas temperatures and establish, for the first time, the lensing mass-temperature relation at z >~ 1. For the power law slope of the M-TX relation (M propto T^{\alpha}), we obtain \alpha=1.54 +/- 0.23. This is consistent with the theoretical self-similar prediction \alpha=3/2 and with the results previously reported in the literature for much lower redshift samples. However, our normalization is lower than the previous results by 20-30%, indicating that the normalization in the M-TX relation might evolve. After correcting for Eddington bias and updating the discovery area with a more conservative choice, we find that the existence of the most massive clusters in our sample still provides a tension with the current Lambda CDM model. The combined probability of finding the four most massive clusters in this sample after marginalization over current cosmological parameters is less than 1%.
  • We study the environmental dependence of stellar population properties at z ~ 1.3. We derive galaxy properties (stellar masses, ages and star formation histories) for samples of massive, red, passive early-type galaxies in two high-redshift clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453 (with redshifts of z = 1.26 and 1.27, respectively), and compare them with those measured for the RDCS1252.9-2927 cluster at z=1.24 and with those measured for a similarly mass-selected sample of field contemporaries drawn from the GOODS-South Field. Robust estimates of the aforementioned parameters have been obtained by comparing a large grid of composite stellar population models with extensive 8-10 band photometric coverage, from the rest-frame far-ultraviolet to the infrared. We find no variations of the overall stellar population properties among the different samples of cluster early-type galaxies. However, when comparing cluster versus field stellar population properties we find that, even if the (star formation weighted) ages are similar and depend only on galaxy mass, the ones in the field do employ longer timescales to assemble their final mass. We find that, approximately 1 Gyr after the onset of star formation, the majority (75%) of cluster galaxies have already assembled most (> 80%) of their final mass, while, by the same time, fewer (35%) field ETGs have. Thus we conclude that while galaxy mass regulates the timing of galaxy formation, the environment regulates the timescale of their star formation histories.
  • We present HST UV/optical imaging, Spitzer mid-IR photometry, and optical spectroscopy of a sample of 30 low-redshift (z=0.1-0.3) galaxies chosen from SDSS/GALEX to be accurate local analogs of the high-z Lyman Break Galaxies. The Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are similar in mass, metallicity, dust, SFR, size and gas velocity dispersion, thus enabling a detailed investigation of processes that are important at high-z. The optical emission line properties of LBAs are also similar to those of LBGs, indicating comparable conditions in their ISM. In the UV, LBAs are characterized by complexes of massive star-forming "clumps", while in the optical they most often show evidence for (post-)mergers/interactions. In 6 cases, we find an extremely massive (>10^9 Msun) compact (R~100 pc) dominant central object (DCO). The DCOs are preferentially found in LBAs with the highest mid-IR luminosities and correspondingly high SFRs (15-100 Msun/yr). We show that the massive SF clumps (including the DCOs) have masses much larger than the nuclear super star clusters seen in normal late type galaxies. However, the DCOs have masses, sizes, and densities similar to the excess-light/central-cusps seen in typical elliptical galaxies with masses similar to the LBA galaxies. We suggest that the DCOs form in present-day examples of the dissipative mergers at high redshift that are believed to have produced the central-cusps in local ellipticals. More generally, the properties of the LBAs are consistent with the idea that instabilities in a gas-rich disk lead to very massive star-forming clumps that eventually coalesce to form a spheroid. We speculate that the DCOs are too young at present to be growing a supermassive black hole because they are still in a supernova-dominated outflow phase.
  • We report on the discovery of three bright, strongly-lensed objects behind Abell 1703 and CL0024+16 from a dropout search over 25 square arcminutes of deep NICMOS data, with deep ACS optical coverage. They are undetected in the deep ACS images below 8500 A and have clear detections in the J and H bands. Fits to the ACS, NICMOS and IRAC data yield robust photometric redshifts in the range z~6-7 and largely rule out the possibility that they are low-redshift interlopers. All three objects are extended, and resolved into a pair of bright knots. The bright i-band dropout in Abell 1703 has an H-band AB magnitude of 23.9, which makes it one of the brightest known galaxy candidates at z>5.5. Our model fits suggest a young, massive galaxy only ~ 60 million years old with a mass of ~ 1E10 solar mass. The dropout galaxy candidates behind CL0024+16 are separated by 2.5" (~ 2 kpc in the source plane), and have H-band AB magnitudes of 25.0 and 25.6. Lensing models of CL0024+16 suggest that the objects have comparable intrinsic magnitudes of AB ~ 27.3, approximately one magnitude fainter than L* at z~6.5. Their similar redshifts, spectral energy distribution, and luminosities, coupled with their very close proximity on the sky, suggest that they are spatially associated, and plausibly are physically bound. Combining this sample with two previously reported, similarly magnified galaxy candidates at z~6-8, we find that complex systems with dual nuclei may be a common feature of high-redshift galaxies.
  • We describe the time- and position-dependent point spread function (PSF) variation of the Wide Field Channel (WFC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with the principal component analysis (PCA) technique. The time-dependent change is caused by the temporal variation of the $HST$ focus whereas the position-dependent PSF variation in ACS/WFC at a given focus is mainly the result of changes in aberrations and charge diffusion across the detector, which appear as position-dependent changes in elongation of the astigmatic core and blurring of the PSF, respectively. Using >400 archival images of star cluster fields, we construct a ACS PSF library covering diverse environments of the $HST$ observations (e.g., focus values). We find that interpolation of a small number ($\sim20$) of principal components or ``eigen-PSFs'' per exposure can robustly reproduce the observed variation of the ellipticity and size of the PSF. Our primary interest in this investigation is the application of this PSF library to precision weak-lensing analyses, where accurate knowledge of the instrument's PSF is crucial. However, the high-fidelity of the model judged from the nice agreement with observed PSFs suggests that the model is potentially also useful in other applications such as crowded field stellar photometry, galaxy profile fitting, AGN studies, etc., which similarly demand a fair knowledge of the PSFs at objects' locations. Our PSF models, applicable to any WFC image rectified with the Lanczos3 kernel, are publicly available.
  • We present a comprehensive mass reconstruction of the rich galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17 at z~0.4 from ACS data, unifying both strong- and weak-lensing constraints. The weak-lensing signal from a dense distribution of background galaxies (~120 per square arcmin) across the cluster enables the derivation of a high-resolution parameter-free mass map. The strongly-lensed objects tightly constrain the mass structure of the cluster inner region on an absolute scale, breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy. The mass reconstruction of Cl 0024+17 obtained in such a way is remarkable. It reveals a ringlike dark matter substructure at r~75" surrounding a soft, dense core at r~50". We interpret this peculiar sub-structure as the result of a high-speed line-of-sight collision of two massive clusters 1-2 Gyr ago. Such an event is also indicated by the cluster velocity distribution. Our numerical simulation with purely collisionless particles demonstrates that such density ripples can arise by radially expanding, decelerating particles that originally comprised the pre-collision cores. Cl 0024+17 can be likened to the bullet cluster 1E0657-56, but viewed $along$ the collision axis at a much later epoch. In addition, we show that the long-standing mass discrepancy for Cl 0024+17 between X-ray and lensing can be resolved by treating the cluster X-ray emission as coming from a superposition of two X-ray systems. The cluster's unusual X-ray surface brightness profile that requires a two isothermal sphere description supports this hypothesis.
  • We present ACS/HST coronagraphic observations of HD 100546, a B9.5 star, 103 pc away from the sun, taken in the F435W, F606W, and F814W bands. Scattered light is detected up to 14'' from the star. The observations are consistent with the presence of an extended flattened nebula with the same inclination as the inner disk. The well-known ``spiral arms'' are clearly observed and they trail the rotating disk material. Weaker arms never before reported are also seen. The inter-arm space becomes brighter, but the structures become more neutral in color at longer wavelengths, which is not consistent with models that assume that they are due to the effects of a warped disk. Along the major disk axis, the colors of the scattered-light relative to the star are \Delta (F435W-F606W) ~ 0.0--0.2 mags and \Delta (F435W-F814W)~0.5--1 mags. To explain these colors, we explore the role of asymmetric scattering, reddening, and large minimum sizes on ISM-like grains. We conclude each of these hypotheses by itself cannot explain the colors. The disk colors are similar to those derived for Kuiper Belt objects, suggesting that the same processes responsible for their colors may be at work here. We argue that we are observing only the geometrically thick, optically thin envelope of the disk, while the optically thick disk responsible for the far-IR emission is undetected. The observed spiral arms are then structures on this envelope. The colors indicate that the extended nebulosity is not a remnant of the infalling envelope but reprocessed disk material.
  • We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z = 2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST/ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50 times 40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 M_sun/yr. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centres of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.
  • We study the photometric and structural properties of spectroscopically confirmed members in the two massive X-ray--selected z=0.83 galaxy clusters MS1054-03 and RXJ0152-1357 using three-band mosaic imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The samples include 105 and 140 members of MS1054-03 and RXJ0152-1357, respectively, with ACS F775W magnitude < 24.0. We develop a promising new structural classification method, based on a combination of the best-fit Sersic indices and the normalized root-mean-square residuals from the fits; the resulting classes agree well with the visual ones, but are less affected by galaxy orientation. We examine the color--magnitude relations in detail and find that the color residuals correlate with the local mass density measured from our weak lensing maps; we identify a threshold density of $\Sigma \approx 0.1$, in units of the critical density, above which the star formation appears to cease. For RXJ0152-1357, we also find a trend in the color residuals with velocity, resulting from an offset of about 980 km/s in the mean redshifts of the early- and late-type galaxies. Analysis of the color--color diagrams indicates that a range of star formation time-scales are needed to reproduce the loci of the galaxy colors. We also identify some cluster galaxies whose colors can only be explained by large amounts, $A_V \approx 1$ mag, of internal dust extinction. [Abstract shortened]
  • (Abridged) We present a HST/ACS weak-lensing study of RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453, the two most distant (at z=1.26 and z=1.27, respectively) clusters yet measured with weak-lensing. The two clusters are separated by ~4' from each other and appear to form a supercluster in the Lynx field. Using our deep ACS F775W and F850LP imaging, we detected weak-lensing signals around both clusters at ~4 sigma levels. The mass distribution indicated by the reconstruction map is in good spatial agreement with the cluster galaxies. From the SIS fitting, we determined that RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 have similar projected masses of ~2.0x10^14 solar mass and ~2.1x10^14 solar mass, respectively, within a 0.5 Mpc (~60") aperture radius.
  • We present HST/ACS observations of the most distant radio galaxy known, TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. This radio galaxy has 6 spectroscopically confirmed Lya emitting companion galaxies, and appears to lie within an overdense region. The radio galaxy is marginally resolved in i_775 and z_850 showing continuum emission aligned with the radio axis, similar to what is observed for lower redshift radio galaxies. Both the half-light radius and the UV star formation rate are comparable to the typical values found for Lyman break galaxies at z~4-5. The Lya emitters are sub-L* galaxies, with deduced star formation rates of 1-10 Msun/yr. One of the Lya emitters is only detected in Lya. Based on the star formation rate of ~3 Msun/yr calculated from Lya, the lack of continuum emission could be explained if the galaxy is younger than ~2 Myr and is producing its first stars. Observations in V_606, i_775, and z_850 were used to identify additional Lyman break galaxies associated with this structure. In addition to the radio galaxy, there are 22 V-break (z~5) galaxies with z_850<26.5 (5sigma), two of which are also in the spectroscopic sample. We compare the surface density of 2/arcmin^2 to that of similarly selected V-dropouts extracted from GOODS and the UDF Parallel fields. We find evidence for an overdensity to very high confidence (>99%), based on a counts-in-cells analysis applied to the control field. The excess is suggestive of the V-break objects being associated with a forming cluster around the radio galaxy.
  • Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images of the young binary GG Tauri and its circumbinary disk in V and I bandpasses were obtained in 2002 and are the most detailed of this system to date. The confirm features previously seen in the disk including: a "gap" apparently caused by shadowing from circumstellar material; an asymmetrical distribution of light about the line of sight on the near edge of the disk; enhanced brightness along the near edge of the disk due to forward scattering; and a compact reflection nebula near the secondary star. New features are seen in the ACS images: two short filaments along the disk; localized but strong variations in disk intensity ("gaplets"); and a "spur" or filament extending from the reflection nebulosity near the secondary. The back side of the disk is detected in the V band for the first time. The disk appears redder than the combined light from the stars, which may be explained by a varied distribution of grain sizes. The brightness asymmetries along the disk suggest that it is asymmetrically illuminated by the stars due to extinction by nonuniform circumstellar material or the illuminated surface of the disk is warped by tidal effects (or perhaps both). Localized, time-dependent brightness variations in the disk are also seen.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) weak-lensing and Chandra X-ray analyses of MS 1054-0321 at z=0.83, the most distant and X-ray luminous cluster in the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey (EMSS). The high-resolution mass reconstruction through ACS weak-lensing reveals the complicated dark matter substructure in unprecedented detail, characterized by the three dominant mass clumps with the four or more minor satellite groups within the current ACS field. The direct comparison of the mass map with the Chandra X-ray image shows that the eastern weak-lensing substructure is not present in the X-ray image and, more interestingly, the two X-ray peaks are displaced away from the hypothesized merging direction with respect to the corresponding central and western mass clumps, possibly because of ram pressure. In addition, as observed in our previous weak-lensing study of another high-redshift cluster CL 0152-1357 at z=0.84, the two dark matter clumps of MS 1054-0321 seem to be offset from the galaxy counterparts. We examine the significance of these offsets and discuss a possible scenario, wherein the dark matter clumps might be moving ahead of the cluster galaxies. The non-parametric weak-lensing mass modeling gives a projected mass of M(r<1 Mpc)=(1.02+-0.15)x 10^{15} solar mass, where the uncertainty reflects both the statistical error and the cosmic shear effects. Our temperature measurement of T=8.9_{-0.8}^{+1.0} keV utilizing the newest available low-energy quantum efficiency degradation prescription for the Chandra instrument, together with the isothermal beta description of the cluster (r_c=16"+-15" and beta=0.78+-0.08), yields a projected mass of M(r<1 Mpc)=(1.2+-0.2) x 10^{15} solar mass, consistent with the weak-lensing result.
  • We present the photometric calibration of the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). We give here an overview of the performance and calibration of the 2 CCD cameras, the Wide Field Channel (WFC) and the High Resolution Channel (HRC), and a description of the best techniques for reducing ACS CCD data. On-orbit observations of spectrophotometric standard stars have been used to revise the pre-launch estimate of the instrument response curves to best match predicted and observed count rates. Synthetic photometry has been used to determine zeropoints for all filters in 3 magnitude systems and to derive interstellar extinction values for the ACS photometric systems. Due to the CCD internal scattering of long wavelength photons, the width of the PSF increases significantly in the near-IR and the aperture correction for photometry with near-IR filters depends on the spectral energy distribution of the source. We provide encircled energy curves and a detailed recipe to correct for the latter effect. Transformations between the ACS photometric systems and the UBVRI and WFPC2 systems are presented. In general, two sets of transformations are available: 1 based on the observation of 2 star clusters; the other on synthetic photometry. We discuss the accuracy of these transformations and their sensitivity to details of the spectra being transformed. Initial signs of detector degradation due to the HST radiative environment are already visible. We discuss the impact on the data in terms of dark rate increase, charge transfer inefficiency, and hot pixel population.
  • We present deep optical imaging of the z=4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338--1942 obtained using the ACS on-board HST. The radio galaxy is known to reside within a large galaxy overdensity (both in physical extent and density contrast). There is good evidence that this `protocluster' region is the progenitor of a present-day rich galaxy cluster. TN J1338 is the dominant galaxy in the protocluster, in terms of size and luminosity and therefore seems destined to evolve into the brightest cluster galaxy. The high spatial-resolution ACS images reveal several kpc-scale features within and around the radio galaxy. The continuum light is aligned with the radio axis and is resolved into two clumps in the i-band and z-band bands. These components have luminosities ~10^9 L_sun and sizes of a few kpc. The estimated star-formation rate for the whole radio galaxy is ~200 M_sun/yr. A simple model in which the jet has triggered star-formation in these continuum knots is consistent with the available data. An unusual feature is seen in Lyman-alpha emission. A wedge-shaped extension emanates from the radio galaxy perpendicularly to the radio axis. This `wedge' naturally connects to the surrounding, asymmetric, large-scale (~100 kpc) Lyman-alpha halo. We posit that the wedge is a starburst-driven superwind, associated with the first major epoch of formation of the brightest cluster galaxy. The shock and wedge are examples of feedback processes due to both AGN and star-formation in the earliest stages of massive galaxy formation.
  • We present a weak lensing analysis of one of the most distant massive galaxy cluster known, RDCS 1252.9-2927 at z=1.24, using deep images from the Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By taking advantage of the depth and of the angular resolution of the ACS images, we detect for the first time at z>1 a clear weak lensing signal in both the i (F775W) and z (F850LP) filters. We measure a 5-\sigma signal in the i band and a 3-\sigma signal in the shallower z band image. The two radial mass profiles are found to be in very good agreement with each other, and provide a measurement of the total mass of the cluster inside a 1Mpc radius of M(<1Mpc) = (8.0 +/- 1.3) x 10^14 M_\odot in the current cosmological concordance model h =0.70, \Omega_m=0.3, \Omega_\Lambda=0.7, assuming a redshift distribution of background galaxies as inferred from the Hubble Deep Fields surveys. A weak lensing signal is detected out to the boundary of our field (3' radius, corresponding to 1.5Mpc at the cluster redshift). We detect a small offset between the centroid of the weak lensing mass map and the brightest cluster galaxy, and we discuss the possible origin of this discrepancy. The cumulative weak lensing radial mass profile is found to be in good agreement with the X-ray mass estimate based on Chandr and XMM-Newton observations, at least out to R_500=0.5Mpc.
  • We combine imaging data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with VLT/FORS optical spectroscopy to study the properties of star-forming galaxies in the z=0.837 cluster CL0152-1357. We have morphological information for 24 star-forming cluster galaxies, which range in morphology from late-type and irregular to compact early-type galaxies. We find that while most star-forming galaxies have $r_{625}-i_{775}$ colors bluer than 1.0, eight are in the red cluster sequence. Among the star-forming cluster population we find five compact early-type galaxies which have properties consistent with their identification as progenitors of dwarf elliptical galaxies. The spatial distribution of the star-forming cluster members is nonuniform. We find none within $R\sim 500$ Mpc of the cluster center, which is highly suggestive of an intracluster medium interaction. We derive star formation rates from [OII] $\lambda\lambda 3727$ line fluxes, and use these to compare the global star formation rate of CL0152-1357 to other clusters at low and intermediate redshifts. We find a tentative correlation between integrated star formation rates and $T_{X}$, in the sense that hotter clusters have lower integrated star formation rates. Additional data from clusters with low X-ray temperatures is needed to confirm this trend. We do not find a significant correlation with redshift, suggesting that evolution is either weak or absent between z=0.2-0.8.
  • We present resolved scattered-light images of the debris disk around HD 107146, a G2 star 28.5 pc from the Sun. This is the first debris disk to be resolved in scattered light around a solar-type star. We observed it with the HST/ACS coronagraph, using a 1.8'' occulting spot and the F606W (broad V) and F814W (broad I) filters. Within 2'' from the star, the image is dominated by PSF subtraction residuals. Outside this limit, the disk looks featureless except for a northeast-southwest brightness asymmetry that we attribute to forward scattering. The disk has scattered-light fractional luminosities of $(L_{Sca}/L_*)_{F606W}=6.8 \pm 0.8 \times 10^{-5}$ and $(L_{Sca}/L_*)_{F814W}=10 \pm 1 \times 10^{-5}$ and it is detected up to 6.5'' away from the star. To map the surface density of the disk, we deproject it by $25^\circ \pm 5^\circ$, divide by the dust scattering phase ($g_{F606W} = 0.3 \pm 0.1$, $g_{F814W} = 0.2 \pm 0.1$) and correct for the geometric dilution of starlight. Within the errors, the surface density has the same shape in each bandpass, and it appears to be a broad (85 AU) ring with most of the opacity concentrated at 130 AU. The ratio of the relative luminosity in F814W to that in F606W has the constant value of $1.3\pm0.3$, with the error dominated by uncertainties in the value of $g$ in each filter. An examination of far infrared and submillimeter measurements suggests the presence of small grains. The colors and the derived values of $g$ are consistent with the presence of dust particles smaller than the radiation pressure limit. The dust generated by the creation of a small planet or the scattering and circularization of a large one, are possible scenarios that may explain the shape of the surface density profile.
  • We present $V$ and $I$ continuum images and H$\alpha$+[N II] maps of nine early-type galaxies observed with the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Dust and ionized gas are detected in all galaxies. The optical nebulae are primarily concentrated on the nuclei and extend out to radii of a few hundred parsecs, in compact clumps, filaments, or disks. Two galaxies, NGC 6166 and NGC 6338, also possess diffuse, ionized filaments on kiloparsec scales. The ionized gas is entirely contained within the nuclear disks of ESO 208-G021, NGC 3078, and NGC 7720. In the radio-loud galaxy NGC 6166, emission-line filaments are detected along the radio lobes, possibly as a result of shock ionization. A wide range of ionized gas masses, $M_g\approx7\times10^2-3\times10^6$ $M_\odot$, are calculated from the observed fluxes. Even in this small sample, the orientation of the ionized material correlates well with the major or minor axis of the galaxies, consistent with an external origin for the dust and gas.
  • (Abridged) We study the internal color properties of a morphologically selected sample of spheroidal galaxies taken from HST/ACS ERO program of UGC 10214 (``The Tadpole''). By taking advantage of the unprecedented high resolution of the ACS in this very deep dataset we are able to characterize spheroids at sub-arcseconds scales. Using the V_606W and I_814W bands, we construct V-I color maps and extract color gradients for a sample of spheroids at I_814W < 24 mag. We investigate the existence of a population of morphologically classified spheroids which show extreme variation in their internal color properties similar to the ones reported in the HDFs. These are displayed as blue cores and inverse color gradients with respect to those accounted from metallicity variations. Following the same analysis we find a similar fraction of early-type systems (~30%-40%) that show non-homologous internal colors, suggestive of recent star formation activity. We present two statistics to quantify the internal color variation in galaxies and for tracing blue cores, from which we estimate the fraction of non-homogeneous to homogeneous internal colors as a function of redshift up to z<1.2. We find that it can be described as about constant as a function of redshift, with a small increase with redshift for the fraction of spheroids that present strong color dispersions. The implications of a constant fraction at all redshifts suggests the existence of a relatively permanent population of evolving spheroids up to z~1. We discuss the implications of this in the context of spheroidal formation.
  • We have discovered three globular clusters beyond the Holmberg radius in Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images of the gas-rich dark matter dominated blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC2915. The clusters, all of which start to resolve into stars, have M_{V606} = -8.9 to -9.8 mag, significantly brighter than the peak of the luminosity function of Milky Way globular clusters. Their colors suggest a metallicity [Fe/H] ~ -1.9 dex, typical of metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. The specific frequency of clusters is at a minimum normal, compared to spiral galaxies. However, since only a small portion of the system has been surveyed it is more likely that the luminosity and mass normalized cluster content is higher, like that seen in elliptical galaxies and galaxy clusters. This suggests that NGC2915 resembles a key phase in the early hierarchical assembly of galaxies - the epoch when much of the old stellar population has formed, but little of the stellar disk. Depending on the subsequent interaction history, such systems could go on to build-up larger elliptical galaxies, evolve into normal spirals, or in rare circumstances remain suspended in their development to become systems like NGC2915.
  • Using an i-z dropout criterion, we determine the space density of z~6 galaxies from two deep ACS GTO fields with deep optical-IR imaging. A total of 23 objects are found over 46 arcmin^2, or ~0.5 objects/arcmin^2 down to z~27.3 (6 sigma; all AB mag) (including one probable z~6 AGN). Combining deep ISAAC data for our RDCS1252-2927 field (J~25.7 and Ks~25.0 (5 sigma)) and NICMOS data for the HDF North (JH~27.3 (5 sigma)), we verify that these dropouts have flat spectral slopes. i-dropouts in our sample range in luminosity from ~1.5 L* (z~25.6) to ~0.3 L* (z~27.3) with the exception of one very bright candidate at z~24.2. The half-light radii vary from 0.09" to 0.29", or 0.5 kpc to 1.7 kpc. We derive the z~6 rest-frame UV luminosity density using three different procedures, each utilizing simulations based on a CDF South V dropout sample. First, we compare our findings with a no-evolution projection of this V-dropout sample. We find 23+/-25% more i-dropouts than we predict. Adopting previous results to z~5, this works out to a 20+/-29% drop in the luminosity density from z~3 to z~6. Second, we use these same V-dropout simulations to derive a selection function for our i-dropout sample and compute the UV-luminosity density (7.2+/-2.5 x 10^25 ergs/s/Hz/Mpc^3 down to z~27). We find a 39+/-21% drop over the same redshift range. This is our preferred value and suggests a star formation rate of 0.0090+/-0.0031 M_sol/yr/Mpc^3 to z~27, or ~0.036+/- 0.012 M_sol/yr/Mpc^3 extrapolating the LF to the faint limit. Third, we follow a very similar procedure, but assume no incompleteness, finding a luminosity density which is ~2-3X lower. This final estimate constitutes a lower limit. All three estimates are within the canonical range of luminosity densities necessary for reionization of the universe at this epoch. (abridged)
  • The off-axis location of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) is the chief (but not sole) cause of strong geometric distortion in all detectors: the Wide Field Camera (WFC), High Resolution Camera (HRC), and Solar Blind Camera (SBC). Dithered observations of rich star cluster fields are used to calibrate the distortion. We describe the observations obtained, the algorithms used to perform the calibrations and the accuracy achieved.
  • Narrow-band imaging surveys aimed at detecting the faint emission from the 5007 [O III] line of intracluster planetary nebulae in Virgo also probe high redshift z=3.1 Ly alpha emitters. Here we report on the spectroscopic identification of 9 Ly alpha emitters at z=3.13, obtained with the FORS spectrograph at Unit 1 of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT UT1). The spectra of these high redshift objects show a narrow, isolated Ly alpha emission with very faint (frequently undetected) continuum, indicating a large equivalent width. No other features are visible in our spectra. Our Ly alpha emitters are quite similar to those found by Hu (1998), Cowie & Hu (1998) and Hu et al. (1998). Using simple population synthesis models, on the assumption that these sources are regions of star formation, we conclude that the nebulae are nearly optically thick and must have a very low dust content, in order to explain the high observed Ly alpha equivalent widths. For the cosmological and star formation parameters we adopted, the total stellar mass produced would seem to correspond to the formation of rather small galaxies, some of which are perhaps destined to merge. The implied star formation density in our sampled comoving volume is probably somewhat smaller than, but of the same order of magnitude as the star formation density at z=3 derived by other authors from Lyman-break galaxy surveys. This result agrees with the expectation that the Ly alpha emitters are a low-metallicity (or low-dust) tail in a distribution of star forming regions at high redshifts. Finally, the Ly alpha emitters may contribute as many H-ionizing photons as QSOs at z=3.
  • We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4535, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 4535 is one of 18 galaxies observed as a part of The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale which aims to measure the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. NGC 4535 was observed over 13 epochs using the F555W filter, and over 9 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data were transformed to the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry was performed using two independent programs, DoPHOT and DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands were constructed using 39 high-quality Cepheids present in our set of 50 variable candidates. We obtain a distance modulus of 31.02+/-0.26 mag, corresponding to a distance of 16.0+/-1.9 Mpc. Our distance estimate is based on values of mu = 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(V-I) = 0.13 mag for the distance modulus and reddening of the LMC, respectively.