• One of the classic ways to measure the success of a scientific facility is the publication return, which is defined as the number of refereed papers produced per unit of allocated resources (for example, telescope time or proposals). The recent studies by Sterzik et al. (2015, 2016) have shown that 30-50 % of the programmes allocated time at ESO do not produce a refereed publication. While this may be inherent to the scientific process, this finding prompted further investigation. For this purpose, ESO conducted a Survey of Non-Publishing Programmes (SNPP) within the activities of the Time Allocation Working Group, similar to the monitoring campaign that was recently implemented at ALMA (Stoehr et al. 2016). The SNPP targeted 1278 programmes scheduled between ESO Periods 78 and 90 (October 2006 to March 2013) that had not published a refereed paper as of April 2016. The poll was launched on 6 May 2016, remained open for four weeks, and returned 965 valid responses. This article summarises and discusses the results of this survey, the first of its kind at ESO.
  • As part of the Accretion Discs in H$\alpha$ with OmegaCAM (ADHOC) survey, we imaged in r, i and H-alpha a region of 12x8 square degrees around the Orion Nebula Cluster. Thanks to the high-quality photometry obtained, we discovered three well-separated pre-main sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. The populations are all concentrated towards the cluster's center. Although several explanations can be invoked to explain these sequences we are left with two competitive, but intriguing, scenarios: a population of unresolved binaries with an exotic mass ratio distribution or three populations with different ages. Independent high-resolution spectroscopy supports the presence of discrete episodes of star formation, each separated by about a million years. The stars from the two putative youngest populations rotate faster than the older ones, in agreement with the evolution of stellar rotation observed in pre-main sequence stars younger than 4 Myr in several star forming regions. Whatever the final explanation, our results prompt for a revised look at the formation mode and early evolution of stars in clusters.
  • Recent work (Corradi et al. 2015, Jones et al. 2016) has shown that the phenomenon of extreme abundance discrepancies, where recombination line abundances exceed collisionally excited line abundances by factors of 10 or more, seem to be strongly associated with planetary nebulae with close binary central stars. To further investigate, we have obtained spectra of a sample of nebulae with known close binary central stars, using FORS2 on the VLT, and we have discovered several new extreme abundance discrepancy objects. We did not find any non-extreme discrepancies, suggesting that a very high fraction of nebulae with close binary central stars also have an extreme abundance discrepancy.
  • Aims. The structural inhomogeneities and kinematics of massive star nebulae are tracers of their mass-loss history. We conduct a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic analysis of the ejecta of eta Car outside its famous Homunculus nebula. Methods. We carried out the first large-scale integral field unit observations of eta Car in the optical, covering a field of view of 1'x1' centered on the star. Observations with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal the detailed three-dimensional structure of eta Car's outer ejecta. Morpho-kinematic modeling of these ejecta is conducted with the code SHAPE. Results. The largest coherent structure in eta Car's outer ejecta can be described as a bent cylinder with roughly the same symmetry axis as the Homunculus nebula. This large outer shell is interacting with the surrounding medium, creating soft X-ray emission. We establish the shape and extent of the ghost shell in front of the southern Homunculus lobe and confirm that the NN condensation can best be modeled as a bowshock in the orbital/equatorial plane. Conclusions. The SHAPE modeling of the MUSE observations indicates that the kinematics of the outer ejecta measured with MUSE can be described by a spatially coherent structure, and this structure also correlates with the extended soft X-ray emission associated with the outer debris field. The ghost shell just outside the southern Homunculus lobe hints at a sequence of eruptions within the time frame of the Great Eruption from 1837-1858 or possibly a later shock/reverse shock velocity separation. Our 3D morpho-kinematic modeling and the MUSE observations constitute an invaluable dataset to be confronted with future radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. Such a comparison may shed light on the yet elusive physical mechanism responsible for eta Car-like eruptions.
  • Not all stars exhibiting the optical spectral characteristics of B[e] stars share the same evolutionary stage. The Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 is a prime example of an object with uncertain classification, with previous work suggesting pre- and post-main sequence classification. Our goal is to settle this debate and provide reliable evolutionary classification. Integral field spectrograph observations with VLT MUSE of the cluster SH 2-266 are used to analyze the nature of MWC 137. A collimated outflow is discovered that is geometrically centered on MWC 137. The central position of MWC 137 in the cluster SH 2-266 within the larger nebula suggests strongly that it is a member of this cluster and that it is both at the origin of the nebula and the newly discovered jet. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram of the brightest cluster stars with stellar evolutionary models results in a distance of about 5.2$\pm$1.4 kpc. We estimate that the cluster is at least 3 Myr old. The jet extends over 66" (1.7 pc) projected on the plane of the sky, shows several knots, and projected velocities of up to $\pm$450 km s$^{-1}$. From the Balmer emission line decrement of the diffuse intracluster nebulosity we determine E(B-V)=1.4 mag for the inner 1' cluster region. The spectral energy distribution of the brightest cluster stars yield a slightly lower extinction of E(B-V)~1.2 mag. The extinction towards MWC 137 is estimated to be E(B-V)~1.8 mag (A$_V$~5.6 mag). Our analysis of the optical and near-infrared color-magnitude and color-color diagrams suggests a post-main sequence stage of MWC 137. The existence of a jet in this object implies the presence of an accretion disk.
  • In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when combined with Gaia astrometric measurements. In order to validate the masses derived from Gaia, interferometric observations are obtained for three SB2s in our sample with F-K components: HIP 14157, HIP 20601 and HIP 117186. The masses of the six stellar components are derived. Due to its edge-on orientation, HIP 14157 is probably an eclipsing binary. We note that almost all the derived masses are a few percent larger than the expectations from the standard spectral-type-mass calibration and mass-luminosity relation. Our calculation also leads to accurate parallaxes for the three binaries, and the Hipparcos parallaxes are confirmed.
  • The HERMES spectrograph installed on the 1.2-m Mercator telescope has been used to monitor the radial velocity of 13 low-metallicity carbon stars, among which 7 Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) stars and 6 CH stars. All stars but one show clear evidence for binarity. New orbits are obtained for 8 systems. The sample covers an extended range in orbital periods, extending from 3.4 d (for the dwarf carbon star HE 0024-2523) to about 54 yr (for the CH star HD 26, the longest known among barium, CH and extrinsic S stars). Three systems exhibit low-amplitude velocity variations with periods close to 1 yr superimposed on a long-term trend. In the absence of an accurate photometric monitoring of these systems, it is not clear yet whether these variations are the signature of a very low-mass companion, or of regular envelope pulsations. The period - eccentricity (P - e) diagram for the 40 low-metallicity carbon stars with orbits now available shows no difference between CH and CEMP-s stars (the latter corresponding to those CEMP stars enriched in s-process elements, as are CH stars). We suggest that they must be considered as one and the same family and that their different names only stem from historical reasons. Indeed, these two families have as well very similar mass-function distributions, corresponding to companions with masses in the range 0.5 - 0.7 Msun, indicative of white-dwarf companions, adopting 0.8 - 0.9 Msun for the primary component. This result confirms that CH and CEMP-s stars obey the same mass-transfer scenario as their higher-metallicity analogs, the barium stars. The P - e diagrams of barium, CH and CEMP-s stars are indeed very similar. They reveal two different groups of systems: one with short orbital periods (P < 1000 d) and mostly circular or almost circular orbits, and another with longer-period and eccentric (e > 0.1) orbits.
  • For about three years, it was known that precision spectrophotometry with FORS2 suffered from systematic errors that made quantitative observations of planetary transits impossible. We identified the Longitudinal Atmospheric Dispersion Compensator (LADC) as the most likely culprit, and therefore engaged in a project to exchange the LADC prisms with the uncoated ones from FORS1. This led to a significant improvement in the depth of FORS2 zero points, a reduction in the systematic noise, and should make FORS2 again competitive for transmission spectroscopy of exoplanets.
  • Context. Nearby isolated planetary mass objects are beginning to be discovered, but their individual properties are poorly constrained because their low surface temperatures and strong molecular self-absorption make them extremely faint. Aims. We aimed to detect the near infrared emission of the coldest brown dwarf (BD) found so far, WISE0855$-$0714, located $\sim$2.2 pc away, and to improve its temperature estimate (T$_{\rm eff}$= 225-260 K) from a comparison with state-of-the-art models of BD atmospheres. Methods. We observed the field containing WISE0855-0714 with HAWK-I at the VLT in the $Y$ band. For BDs with T$_{\rm eff}<$500\,K theoretical models predict strong signal (or rather less molecular absorption) in this band. Results. WISE0855-0714 was not detected in our Y-band images, thus placing an upper limit on its brightness to Y>24.4 mag at 3-$\sigma$ level, leading to Y-[4.5]>10.5. Combining this limit with previous detections and upper limits at other wavelengths, WISE0855$-$0714 is confirmed as the reddest BD detected, further supporting its status as the coldest known brown dwarf. We applied spectral energy distribution fitting with collections of models from two independent groups for extremely cool BD atmospheres leading to an effective temperature of T$_{\rm eff}<$250\,K,.
  • VLTI/AMBER and VLTI/PIONIER observations of the LBV HR Car show an interferometric signature that could not possibly be explained by an extended wind, more or less symmetrically distributed around a single object. Instead, observations both in the Br$\gamma$ line and the H-band continuum are best explained by two point sources (or alternatively one point source and one slightly extended source) at about 2 mas separation and a contrast ratio of about 1:5. These observations establish that HR Car is a binary, but further interpretation will only be possible with future observations to constrain the orbit. Under the assumption that the current separation is close to the maximum one, the orbital period can be estimated to be of the order of 5 years, similar as in the $\eta$ Car system. This would make HR Car the second such LBV binary.
  • The existence of blue straggler stars (BSS), which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution, as such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. As such, BSS could just be some quirks but in fact their understanding requires a deep knowledge of many different areas in astronomy, from stellar evolution through cluster dynamics, from chemical abundances to stellar populations. In November 2012, a workshop on this important topic took place at the ESO Chilean headquarters in Santiago. The many topics covered at this workshop were introduced by very comprehensive invited reviews, providing a unique and insightful view on the field. These reviews have now become chapters of the first ever book on BSS.
  • Using FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope, we have astrometrically monitored over a period of two months the two components of the brown dwarf system WISE J104915.57-531906.1, the closest one to the Sun. Our astrometric measurements - with a relative precision at the milli-arcsecond scale - allow us to detect the orbital motion and derive more precisely the parallax of the system, leading to a distance of 2.020+/-0.019 pc. The relative orbital motion of the two objects is found to be perturbed, which leads us to suspect the presence of a substellar companion around one of the two components. We also perform VRIz photometry of both components and compare with models. We confirm the flux reversal of the T dwarf.
  • LoTr 1 is a planetary nebula thought to contain an intermediate-period binary central star system (that is, a system with an orbital period, P, between 100 and, say, 1500 days). The system shows the signature of a K-type, rapidly rotating giant, and most likely constitutes an accretion-induced post-mass transfer system similar to other PNe such as LoTr 5, WeBo 1 and A70. Such systems represent rare opportunities to further the investigation into the formation of barium stars and intermediate period post-AGB systems -- a formation process still far from being understood. Here, we present the first detailed analyses of both the central star system and the surrounding nebula of LoTr 1 using a combination of spectra obtained with VLT-FORS2, AAT-UCLES and NTT-EMMI, as well as SuperWASP photometry. We confirm the binary nature of the central star of LoTr 1 that consists of a K1 III giant and a hot white dwarf. The cool giant does not present any sign of s-process enhancement but is shown to have a rotation period of 6.4 days, which is a possible sign of mass accretion. LoTr 1 also presents broad double-peaked H-alpha emission lines, whose origin is still unclear. The nebula of LoTr 1 consists in two slightly elongated shells, with ages of 17,000 and 35,000 years, respectively, and with different orientations. As such, LoTr 1 present a very different nebular morphology than A70 and WeBo 1, which may be an indication of difference in the mass transfer episodes
  • Symbiotic stars are eccellent laboratories to study a broad range of poorly understood physical processes, such as mass loss of red giants, accretion onto compact objects, and evolution of nova-like outbursts. As their evolution is strongly influenced by the mass transfer episodes, understanding the history of these systems requires foremost to determine which process is at play: Roche lobe overflow, stellar wind accretion, or some more complex mixture of both. We report here an interferometric study of the symbiotic system SS Leporis, performed with the unique PIONIER instrument. By determining the binary orbit and revisiting the parameters of the two stars, we show that the giant does not fill its Roche lobe, and that the mass transfer most likely occurs via the accretion of an important part of the giant's wind.
  • The three objects have been identified as members of the recently recognized class of Gamma Doradus stars, which exhibit multi-periodic photometric variations that are thought to arise from non-radial pulsation. The particular objects treated here also prove to be spectroscopic binaries, for which we provide reliable orbits. The radial velocities exhibit unusually large residuals, in which some of the photometric periodicities can be traced. Some of the same periodicities are also demonstrated by the observed variations in the line profiles, which are quantified here simply in terms of the line-widths.
  • We present time-resolved photometry of five relatively poorly-studied cataclysmic variables: V1193 Ori, LQ Peg, LD 317, V795 Her, and MCT 2347-3144. The observations were made using four 1m-class telescopes for a total of more than 250 h of observation and almost 16,000 data points. For LQ Peg WHT spectroscopic data have been analysed as well. The light curves show a wide range of variability on different time scales from minutes to months. We detect for the first time a brightness variation of 0.05 mag in amplitude in V1193 Ori on the same timescale as the orbital period, which we interpret as the result of the irradiation of the secondary. A 20-min quasi-periodic oscillation is also detected. The mean brightness of the system has changed by 0.5 mag on a three-month interval, while the flickering was halved. In LQ Peg a 0.05 mag modulation was revealed with a period of about 3 h. The flickering was much smaller, of the order of 0.025 mag. A possible quasi-periodic oscillation could exist near 30 min. For this object, the WHT spectra are single-peaked and do not show any radial-velocity variations. The data of LD 317 show a decrease in the mean magnitude of the system. No periodic signal was detected but this is certainly attributable to the very large flickering observed: between 0.07 and 0.1 mag. For V795 Her, the 2.8-hour modulation, thought to be a superhump arising from the precession of the disc, is present. We show that this modulation is not stable in terms of periodicity, amplitude, and phase. Finally, for MCT 2347-3144, a clear modulation is seen in a first dataset obtained in October 2002. This modulation is absent in August 2003, when the system was brighter and showed much more flickering.
  • We present an analysis of CCD photometric observations of the eclipsing novalike cataclysmic variable DW UMa obtained in two different luminosity states: high and intermediate. The star presents eclipses with very different depth: ~1.2 mag in the high and ~3.4 mag in the intermediate state. Eclipse mapping reveals that this difference is almost entirely due to the changes in the accretion disc radius: from ~0.5RL1 in the intermediate state to ~0.75RL1 in the high state (RL1 is the distance from the white dwarf to the first Lagrangian point). In the intermediate state, the entire disc is eclipsed while in the high state, its outer part remains visible. We also find that the central intensity of the disc is nearly the same in the two luminosity states and that it is the increase of the disc radius that is responsible for the final rise from the 1999/2000 low state. We find that the intensity profile of the disc is rather flat and suggest a possible explanation. We also discuss the effect of using a more realistic limb-darkening law on the disc temperatures inferred from eclipse mapping experiments. Periodogram analysis of the high state data reveals "positive superhumps" with a period of 0.1455 in 2002 and 0.1461 in 2003, in accord with the results of Patterson et al. However, we cannot confirm the quasi-periodic oscillations reported by these authors. We obtain an updated orbital ephemeris of DW UMa: Tmin[HJD]=2446229.00687(9)+0.136606527(3)E.
  • Three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations are performed in order to investigate mass transfer in a close binary system, in which one component undergoes mass loss through a wind. The mass ratio is assumed to be unity. The radius of the mass-losing star is taken to be about a quarter of the separation between the two stars. Calculations are performed for gases with a ratio of specific heats gamma=1.01 and 5/3. Mass loss is assumed to be thermally driven so that the other parameter is the sound speed of the gas on the mass-losing star. Here, we focus our attention on two features: flow patterns and mass accretion ratio, which we define as the ratio of the mass accretion rate onto the companion to the mass loss rate from the mass-losing primary star. We characterize the flow by the mean normal velocity of wind on the critical Roche surface of the mass-losing star, Vr. When Vr<0.4 A Omega, where A and Omega are the separation between the two stars and the angular orbital frequency of the binary, respectively, we obtain Roche-lobe over-flow (RLOF), while for Vr>0.7 A Omega we observe wind accretion. We find very complex flow patterns in between these two extreme cases. We derive an empirical formula of the mass accretion ratio in the low and in the high velocity regime.
  • We present time-resolved photometry of two cataclysmic variables whose CCD photometric observations were obtained with the 1m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory in October 2002 and August 2003 and with the 1m telescope at Hoher List in Germany. Concerning MCT 2347-3144 we detect for the first time a period of 6.65h. For V1193 Ori the 3.96 h periodicity has for the first time been confirmed through time-resolved photometry.
  • The two stars that form the subject of this paper are both short-period double- lined eclipsing binaries having non-circular orbits despite their short periods. Although the HD type of HD 152028 is G0, the integrated spectral type of the system must actually be much earlier: the B-V colour index is only about 0.37 mag and the parallax indicates an integrated absolute magnitude as bright as +1.4 mag. A published photometric investigation suggests that the primary star exhibits delta Scuti pulsations, with a period of 0.1138 days. That period is not present in the radial velocities, but we have identified a comparable periodicity in the initially excessive residuals (sigma of the order of 2 km/s) in the radial velocities of the primary star: there is an asymmetrical pulsational velocity curve with a semi-amplitude of about 3 km/s and a period of 0.1178 days. HDE 284195 was not observed by Hipparcos, but its HDE type of G0 is in reasonable agreement with its colour and the nature of its radial-velocity traces. The rotations of both stars appear to be pseudo-synchronized to the orbit. The orbital inclinations are not formally determined but they must be very high,however and there is specific evidence that the inclination of HD 152028 is very close to 90 degrees,so it is permissible to assume that the masses are scarcely above the minimum values, which in the case of HD 152028 are 1.78 and 1.42 solar mass and in that of HDE 284195 are 1.10 and 1.01 solar mass, with uncertainties below 1%.(ABRIDGED)
  • By reanalyzing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of a large sample of spectroscopic binaries containing a giant, we obtain a sample of 29 systems fulfilling a carefully derived set of constraints and hence for which we can derive an accurate orbital solution. Of these, one is a double-lined spectroscopic binary and six were not listed in the DMSA/O section of the catalogue. Using our solutions, we derive the masses of the components in these systems and statistically analyze them. We also briefly discuss each system individually.
  • We have undertaken a photometric study of the SW Sex star, PX And. We clearly identify a negative superhump signal which might be regarded as the signature of a nodal precessing disc, possibly warped. PX And is also observed to possess highly variable eclipse depth and we discuss two possible explanations.
  • Results of a photometric study of the SW Sex novalike PX And are presented. The periodogram analysis of the observations obtained in October 2000 reveals the presence of three signals with periods of 0.142, 4.8 and 0.207 days. The first two periods are recognized as "negative superhumps" and the corresponding retrograde precession period of the accretion disk. The origin of the third periodic signal remains unknown. The observations in September-October 2001 point only to the presence of "negative superhumps" and possibly to the precession period. The origin of the "negative superhumps" is discussed and two possible mechanisms are suggested. All light curves show strong flickering activity and power spectra with a typical red noise shape. PX And shows eclipses with highly variable shape and depth. The analysis suggests that the eclipse depth is modulated with the precession period and two possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed. An improved orbital ephemeris is also determined: T_min[HJD]=49238.83662(14)+0.146352739(11)E.
  • In the first part of this article, we review the observational evidence for spirals in the accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. It is shown that with the increasing amount of data available, spirals appear to be an omnipresent feature of accretion discs in outburst. Spirals seem to live until decline that is, for several tens of orbital periods. We then study the formation of spiral shocks from a theoretical side, using the results of various numerical simulations. We make a comparison between observations and theory and briefly discuss the implications of the presence of spirals in the discs of cataclysmic variables.
  • We present a list of delta Scuti stars in double and multiple systems, ranging from the very wide binaries to the very close ones such as spectroscopic and eclipsing systems including the optical visual pairs which are of no further use here. Our aim is to group the information from the binarity on the one hand and the pulsational characteristics on the other hand for as complete a sample as possible of delta Scuti stars in stellar systems. A selection of 18 well-documented cases, taking care that every type of binary is being represented, is discussed more extensively.