• Investigations of the origin and evolution of the Milky Way disk have long relied on chemical and kinematic identification of its components to reconstruct our Galactic past. Difficulties in determining precise stellar ages have restricted most studies to small samples, normally confined to the solar neighbourhood. Here we break this impasse with the help of asteroseismic inference and perform a chronology of the evolution of the disk throughout the age of the Galaxy. We chemically dissect the Milky Way disk population using a sample of red giant stars spanning out to 2~kpc in the solar annulus observed by the {\it Kepler} satellite, with the added dimension of asteroseismic ages. Our results reveal a clear difference in age between the low- and high-$\alpha$ populations, which also show distinct velocity dispersions in the $V$ and $W$ components. We find no tight correlation between age and metallicity nor [$\alpha$/Fe] for the high-$\alpha$ disk stars. Our results indicate that this component formed over a period of more than 2~Gyr with a wide range of [M/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe] independent of time. Our findings show that the kinematic properties of young $\alpha$-rich stars are consistent with the rest of the high-$\alpha$ population and different from the low-$\alpha$ stars of similar age, rendering support to their origin being old stars that went through a mass transfer or stellar merger event, making them appear younger, instead of migration of truly young stars formed close to the Galactic bar.
  • We conduct a multiwavelength continuum variability study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 to investigate the temperature structure of its accretion disk. The 19 overlapping continuum light curves (1158 to 9157 angstroms) combine simultaneous HST , Swift , and ground-based observations over a 180 day period from 2014 January to July. Light-curve variability is interpreted as the reverberation response of the accretion disk to irradiation by a central time-varying point source. Our model yields the disk inclination, i, temperature T1 at 1 light day from the black hole, and a temperature-radius slope, alpha. We also infer the driving light curve and find that it correlates poorly with both the hard and soft X-ray light curves, suggesting that the X-rays alone may not drive the ultraviolet and optical variability over the observing period. We also decompose the light curves into bright, faint, and mean accretion-disk spectra. These spectra lie below that expected for a standard blackbody accretion disk accreting at L/LEdd = 0.1
  • We present a molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) that covers the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our CO redshift coverage spans z<0.45, 1<z<1.9 and all z>2. We reach a CO detection limit that is deep enough to detect essentially all z>1 CO lines reported in the literature so far. We have developed and applied different line searching algorithms, resulting in the discovery of 17 line candidates. We estimate that the rate of false positive line detections is ~2/17. We identify optical/NIR counterparts from the deep ancillary database of the HDF-N for seven of these candidates and investigate their available SEDs. Two secure CO detections in our scan are identified with star-forming galaxies at z=1.784 and at z=2.047. These galaxies have colors consistent with the `BzK' color selection and they show relatively bright CO emission compared with galaxies of similar dust continuum luminosity. We also detect two spectral lines in the submillimeter galaxy HDF850.1 at z=5.183. We consider an additional 9 line candidates as high quality. Our observations also provide a deep 3mm continuum map (1-sigma noise level = 8.6 $\mu$Jy/beam). Via a stacking approach, we find that optical/MIR bright galaxies contribute only to <50% of the SFR density at 1<z<3, unless high dust temperatures are invoked. The present study represents a first, fundamental step towards an unbiased census of molecular gas in `normal' galaxies at high-z, a crucial goal of extragalactic astronomy in the ALMA era.
  • We present direct constraints on the CO luminosity function at high redshift and the resulting cosmic evolution of the molecular gas density, $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z), based on a blind molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our line scan of the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) covers a cosmic volume of ~7000 Mpc$^3$, and redshift ranges z<0.45, 1.01<z<1.89 and z>2. We use the rich multiwavelength and spectroscopic database of the HDF-N to derive some of the best constraints on CO luminosities in high redshift galaxies to date. We combine the blind CO detections in our molecular line scan (presented in a companion paper) with stacked CO limits from galaxies with available spectroscopic redshifts (slit or mask spectroscopy from Keck and grism spectroscopy from HST) to give first blind constraints on high-z CO luminosity functions and the cosmic evolution of the H2 mass density $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) out to redshifts z~3. A comparison to empirical predictions of $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) shows that the securely detected sources in our molecular line scan already provide significant contributions to the predicted $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) in the redshift bins <z>~1.5 and <z>~2.7. Accounting for galaxies with CO luminosities that are not probed by our observations results in cosmic molecular gas densities $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) that are higher than current predictions. We note however that the current uncertainties (in particular the luminosity limits, number of detections, as well as cosmic volume probed) are significant, a situation that is about to change with the emerging ALMA observatory.
  • Using spectroscopy from the Large Binocular Telescope and imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope we discovered the first strong galaxy lens at z(lens)>1. The lens has a secure photometric redshift of z=1.53+/-0.09 and the source is spectroscopically confirmed at z=3.417. The Einstein radius (0.35"; 3.0 kpc) encloses 7.6 x 10^10 Msol, with an upper limit on the dark matter fraction of 60%. The highly magnified (40x) source galaxy has a very small stellar mass (~10^8 Msol) and shows an extremely strong [OIII]_5007A emission line (EW_0 ~ 1000A) bolstering the evidence that intense starbursts among very low-mass galaxies are common at high redshift.
  • We combine new sensitive, wide-field CO data from the HERACLES survey with ultraviolet and infrared data from GALEX and Spitzer to compare the surface densities of H2, Sigma_H2, and recent star formation rate, Sigma_SFR, over many thousands of positions in 30 nearby disk galaxies. We more than quadruple the size of the galaxy sample compared to previous work and include targets with a wide range of galaxy properties. Even though the disk galaxies in this study span a wide range of properties, we find a strong and approximately linear correlation between Sigma_SFR and Sigma_H2 at our common resolution of 1kpc. This implies a roughly constant median H2 consumption time, tau_H2 = Sigma_H2 / Sigma_SFR, of ~2.35Gyr (including heavy elements) across our sample. At 1kpc resolution, there is only a weak correlation between Sigma_H2 and tau_H2 over the range Sigma_H2~5-100M_sun/pc^2, which is probed by our data. We compile a broad set of literature measurements that have been obtained using a variety of star formation tracers, sampling schemes and physical scales and show that overall, these data yield almost exactly the same results, although with more scatter. We interpret these results as strong, albeit indirect evidence that star formation proceeds in a uniform way in giant molecular clouds in the disks of spiral galaxies.
  • We have compiled an extensive dataset on potential parts of the Monoceros tidal stream and performed an exhaustive survey of dwarf galaxy semi-analytic orbits in order to constrain its orbital properties. The best-fit orbits are subsequently realized as self-consistent N-body simulations in order to reproduce the spatial and velocity distribution of satellite debris. We find that all kinematic and geometric constraints can be fit by a single stream allowing for multiple wraps. The orbital eccentricity and inclination of the progenitor are strongly constrained to be e = 0.10 \pm 0.05 and i = 25 \pm 5 deg. Ten new estimates of proper motions from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) clearly exclude all retrograde orbits. Particles lost by the satellite populate two, nearly concentric rings naturally explaining the detection of stream stars at both 6--8 kpc (Ibata et al. 2003, Newberg et al. 2003) and 12--18 kpc (the Tri/And stream; Rocha-Pinto et al. 2003) from the Sun. We have attempted to predict the present location of the Monoceros stream progenitor using different information: (i) the kinematical and spatial distribution of detections and (ii) the different mean metallicity in the innner and the outer rings. A current location at l ~ 245, b ~ -18., with a distance to the Sun r_s~15 kpc, reproduces the available constraints. The mass of the progenitor has been poorly determined due to the slow orbital decay. Similar fits have been obtained for masses (3-9)10^8 M_sun. Additionally, we have analyzed to possible common origin of the Canis Major dwarf and the Monoceros stream, unfortunately, without a conclusive result.
  • We present new VLT spectroscopic observations of the most distant quasar known, SDSS J1030+0524 at z=6.28 which was recently discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We confirm the presence of a complete Gunn-Peterson trough caused by neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. There is no detectable flux over the wavelength range from 8450 to 8710 A. We set an improved limit on the drop of the flux level blueward of the Ly alpha line: a factor of > 200. Below 8450 A the spectrum shows a rise in flux, with a large fraction (> 60 %) of the total emission produced by few narrow features of transmitted flux. We discuss the obvious proximity effect around this quasar, with the presence of transmitted flux with many absorption features in a region of about 23h^{-1} comoving Mpc. If assuming the surrounding medium were completely neutral, the size of this region would imply a quasar lifetime of \~1.3x10^7 years. We also present near-IR spectroscopy of both SDSS J1030+0524 and of SDSS J1306+05, the second most distant quasar known at redshift 6.0. We combine measurements of the CIV line and limits on the HeII emission with the NV line measurements from the optical spectra to derive line ratios, and by implication the abundances of these early quasar environments. The results are indistinguishable from those of lower redshift quasars and indicate little or no evolution in the abundances from z ~ 6 to z ~ 2. The line ratios suggest supersolar metallicities, implying that the first stars around the quasars must have formed at least a few hundreds of Myrs prior to the observation, i.e. at redshift higher than 8.