• Profiles of dark matter-dominated halos at the group and cluster scales play an important role in modern cosmology. Using results from two very large cosmological $N$-body simulations, which increase the available volume at their mass resolution by roughly two orders of magnitude, we robustly determine the halo concentration-mass $(c-M)$ relation over a wide range of masses, employing multiple methods of concentration measurement. We characterize individual halo profiles, as well as stacked profiles, relevant for galaxy-galaxy lensing and next-generation cluster surveys; the redshift range covered is $0\leq z \leq 4$, with a minimum halo mass of $M_{200c}\sim2\times10^{11} M_\odot$. Despite the complexity of a proper description of a halo (environmental effects, merger history, nonsphericity, relaxation state), when the mass is scaled by the nonlinear mass scale $M_\star(z)$, we find that a simple non-power-law form for the $c-M/M_\star$ relation provides an excellent description of our simulation results across eight decades in $M/M_{\star}$ and for $0\leq z \leq 4$. Over the mass range covered, the $c-M$ relation has two asymptotic forms: an approximate power law below a mass threshold $M/M_\star\sim 500-1000$, transitioning to a constant value, $c_0\sim 3$ at higher masses. The relaxed halo fraction decreases with mass, transitioning to a constant value of $\sim 0.5$ above the same mass threshold. We compare Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and Einasto fits to stacked profiles in narrow mass bins at different redshifts; as expected, the Einasto profile provides a better description of the simulation results. At cluster scales at low redshift, however, both NFW and Einasto profiles are in very good agreement with the simulation results, consistent with recent weak lensing observations.
  • Zeeshan Ahmed, Yuri Alexeev, Giorgio Apollinari, Asimina Arvanitaki, David Awschalom, Karl K. Berggren, Karl Van Bibber, Przemyslaw Bienias, Geoffrey Bodwin, Malcolm Boshier, Daniel Bowring, Davide Braga, Karen Byrum, Gustavo Cancelo, Gianpaolo Carosi, Tom Cecil, Clarence Chang, Mattia Checchin, Sergei Chekanov, Aaron Chou, Aashish Clerk, Ian Cloet, Michael Crisler, Marcel Demarteau, Ranjan Dharmapalan, Matthew Dietrich, Junjia Ding, Zelimir Djurcic, John Doyle, James Fast, Michael Fazio, Peter Fierlinger, Hal Finkel, Patrick Fox, Gerald Gabrielse, Andrei Gaponenko, Maurice Garcia-Sciveres, Andrew Geraci, Jeffrey Guest, Supratik Guha, Salman Habib, Ron Harnik, Amr Helmy, Yuekun Heng, Jason Henning, Joseph Heremans, Phay Ho, Jason Hogan, Johannes Hubmayr, David Hume, Kent Irwin, Cynthia Jenks, Nick Karonis, Raj Kettimuthu, Derek Kimball, Jonathan King, Eve Kovacs, Richard Kriske, Donna Kubik, Akito Kusaka, Benjamin Lawrie, Konrad Lehnert, Paul Lett, Jonathan Lewis, Pavel Lougovski, Larry Lurio, Xuedan Ma, Edward May, Petra Merkel, Jessica Metcalfe, Antonino Miceli, Misun Min, Sandeep Miryala, John Mitchell, Vesna Mitrovic, Holger Mueller, Sae Woo Nam, Hogan Nguyen, Howard Nicholson, Andrei Nomerotski, Michael Norman, Kevin O'Brien, Roger O'Brient, Umeshkumar Patel, Bjoern Penning, Sergey Perverzev, Nicholas Peters, Raphael Pooser, Chrystian Posada, James Proudfoot, Tenzin Rabga, Tijana Rajh, Sergio Rescia, Alexander Romanenko, Roger Rusack, Monika Schleier-Smith, Keith Schwab, Julie Segal, Ian Shipsey, Erik Shirokoff, Andrew Sonnenschein, Valerie Taylor, Robert Tschirhart, Chris Tully, David Underwood, Vladan Vuletic, Robert Wagner, Gensheng Wang, Harry Weerts, Nathan Woollett, Junqi Xie, Volodymyr Yefremenko, John Zasadzinski, Jinlong Zhang, Xufeng Zhang, Vishnu Zutshi
    March 30, 2018 hep-ph, hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    Report of the first workshop to identify approaches and techniques in the domain of quantum sensing that can be utilized by future High Energy Physics applications to further the scientific goals of High Energy Physics.
  • We introduce a new cosmic emulator for the matter power spectrum covering eight cosmological parameters. Targeted at optical surveys, the emulator provides accurate predictions out to a wavenumber k~5/Mpc and redshift z<=2. Besides covering the standard set of LCDM parameters, massive neutrinos and a dynamical dark energy of state are included. The emulator is built on a sample set of 36 cosmological models, carefully chosen to provide accurate predictions over the wide and large parameter space. For each model, we have performed a high-resolution simulation, augmented with sixteen medium-resolution simulations and TimeRG perturbation theory results to provide accurate coverage of a wide k-range; the dataset generated as part of this project is more than 1.2Pbyte. With the current set of simulated models, we achieve an accuracy of approximately 4%. Because the sampling approach used here has established convergence and error-control properties, follow-on results with more than a hundred cosmological models will soon achieve ~1% accuracy. We compare our approach with other prediction schemes that are based on halo model ideas and remapping approaches. The new emulator code is publicly available.
  • The pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal from galaxy clusters is a probe of their line-of-sight momenta, and thus a potentially valuable source of cosmological information. In addition to the momenta, the amplitude of the measured signal depends on the properties of the intra-cluster gas and observational limitations such as errors in determining cluster centers and redshifts. In this work we simulate the pairwise kSZ signal of clusters at z<1, using the output from a cosmological N-body simulation and including the properties of the intra-cluster gas via a model that can be varied in post-processing. We find that modifications to the gas profile due to star formation and feedback reduce the pairwise kSZ amplitude of clusters by ~50%, relative to the naive 'gas traces mass' assumption. We demonstrate that mis-centering can reduce the overall amplitude of the pairwise kSZ signal by up to 10%, while redshift errors can lead to an almost complete suppression of the signal at small separations. We confirm that a high-significance detection is expected from the combination of data from current-generation, high-resolution CMB experiments, such as the South Pole Telescope, and cluster samples from optical photometric surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey. Furthermore, we forecast that future experiments such as Advanced ACTPol in conjunction with data from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument will yield detection significances of at least 20{\sigma}, and up to 57{\sigma} in an optimistic scenario. Our simulated maps are publicly available at: http://www.hep.anl.gov/cosmology/ksz.html
  • Large-scale structure surveys in the coming years will measure the redshift-space power spectrum to unprecedented accuracy, allowing for powerful new tests of the LambdaCDM picture as well as measurements of particle physics parameters such as the neutrino masses. We extend the Time-RG perturbative framework to redshift space, computing the power spectrum P_s(k,mu) in massive neutrino cosmologies with time-dependent dark energy equations of state w(z). Time-RG is uniquely capable of incorporating scale-dependent growth into the P_s(k,mu) computation, which is important for massive neutrinos as well as modified gravity models. Although changes to w(z) and the neutrino mass fraction both affect the late-time scale-dependence of the non-linear power spectrum, we find that the two effects depend differently on the line-of-sight angle mu. Finally, we use the HACC N-body code to quantify errors in the perturbative calculations. For a LambdaCDM model at redshift z=1, our procedure predicts the monopole~(quadrupole) to 1% accuracy up to a wave number 0.19h/Mpc (0.28h/Mpc), compared to 0.08h/Mpc (0.07h/Mpc) for the Kaiser approximation and 0.19h/Mpc (0.16h/Mpc) for the current state-of-the-art perturbation scheme. Our calculation agrees with the simulated redshift-space power spectrum even for neutrino masses above the current bound, and for rapidly-evolving dark energy equations of state, |dw/dz| ~ 1. Along with this article, we make our redshift-space Time-RG implementation publicly available as the code redTime.
  • In this work, we introduce GRChombo: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial "many-boxes-in-many-boxes" mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the Message Passing Interface (MPI). GRChombo evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3+1 setting, whilst also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that GRChombo can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.
  • Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.
  • The halo occupation distribution (HOD) approach has proven to be an effective method for modeling galaxy clustering and bias. In this approach, galaxies of a given type are probabilistically assigned to individual halos in N-body simulations. In this paper, we present a fast emulator for predicting the fully nonlinear galaxy power spectrum over a range of freely specifiable HOD modeling parameters. The emulator is constructed using results from 100 HOD models run on a large LCDM N-body simulation, with Gaussian Process interpolation applied to a PCA-based representation of the galaxy power spectrum. The total error is currently ~3% (~2% in the simulation and ~1% in the emulation process) from z=1 to z=0, over the considered parameter range. We use the emulator to investigate parametric dependencies in the HOD model, as well as the behavior of galaxy bias as a function of HOD parameters. The emulator is publicly available at http://www.hep.anl.gov/cosmology/CosmicEmu/emu.html.
  • Ground and space-based sky surveys enable powerful cosmological probes based on measurements of galaxy properties and the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. These probes include weak lensing, baryon acoustic oscillations, abundance of galaxy clusters, and redshift space distortions; they are essential to improving our knowledge of the nature of dark energy. On the theory and modeling front, large-scale simulations of cosmic structure formation play an important role in interpreting the observations and in the challenging task of extracting cosmological physics at the needed precision. These simulations must cover a parameter range beyond the standard six cosmological parameters and need to be run at high mass and force resolution. One key simulation-based task is the generation of accurate theoretical predictions for observables, via the method of emulation. Using a new sampling technique, we explore an 8-dimensional parameter space including massive neutrinos and a variable dark energy equation of state. We construct trial emulators using two surrogate models (the linear power spectrum and an approximate halo mass function). The new sampling method allows us to build precision emulators from just 26 cosmological models and to increase the emulator accuracy by adding new sets of simulations in a prescribed way. This allows emulator fidelity to be systematically improved as new observational data becomes available and higher accuracy is required. Finally, using one LCDM cosmology as an example, we study the demands imposed on a simulation campaign to achieve the required statistics and accuracy when building emulators for dark energy investigations.
  • Modeling large-scale sky survey observations is a key driver for the continuing development of high resolution, large-volume, cosmological simulations. We report the first results from the 'Q Continuum' cosmological N-body simulation run carried out on the GPU-accelerated supercomputer Titan. The simulation encompasses a volume of (1300 Mpc)^3 and evolves more than half a trillion particles, leading to a particle mass resolution of ~1.5 X 10^8 M_sun. At this mass resolution, the Q Continuum run is currently the largest cosmology simulation available. It enables the construction of detailed synthetic sky catalogs, encompassing different modeling methodologies, including semi-analytic modeling and sub-halo abundance matching in a large, cosmological volume. Here we describe the simulation and outputs in detail and present first results for a range of cosmological statistics, such as mass power spectra, halo mass functions, and halo mass-concentration relations for different epochs. We also provide details on challenges connected to running a simulation on almost 90% of Titan, one of the fastest supercomputers in the world, including our usage of Titan's GPU accelerators.
  • Current and future surveys of large-scale cosmic structure are associated with a massive and complex datastream to study, characterize, and ultimately understand the physics behind the two major components of the 'Dark Universe', dark energy and dark matter. In addition, the surveys also probe primordial perturbations and carry out fundamental measurements, such as determining the sum of neutrino masses. Large-scale simulations of structure formation in the Universe play a critical role in the interpretation of the data and extraction of the physics of interest. Just as survey instruments continue to grow in size and complexity, so do the supercomputers that enable these simulations. Here we report on HACC (Hardware/Hybrid Accelerated Cosmology Code), a recently developed and evolving cosmology N-body code framework, designed to run efficiently on diverse computing architectures and to scale to millions of cores and beyond. HACC can run on all current supercomputer architectures and supports a variety of programming models and algorithms. It has been demonstrated at scale on Cell- and GPU-accelerated systems, standard multi-core node clusters, and Blue Gene systems. HACC's design allows for ease of portability, and at the same time, high levels of sustained performance on the fastest supercomputers available. We present a description of the design philosophy of HACC, the underlying algorithms and code structure, and outline implementation details for several specific architectures. We show selected accuracy and performance results from some of the largest high resolution cosmological simulations so far performed, including benchmarks evolving more than 3.6 trillion particles.
  • Over the next decade, cosmological measurements of the large-scale structure of the Universe will be sensitive to the combined effects of dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. The matter power spectrum is a key repository of this information. We extend higher-order perturbative methods for computing the power spectrum to investigate these effects over quasi-linear scales. Through comparison with N-body simulations we establish the regime of validity of a Time-Renormalization Group (Time-RG) perturbative treatment that includes dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. We also quantify the accuracy of Standard (SPT), Renormalized (RPT) and Lagrangian Resummation (LPT) perturbation theories without massive neutrinos. We find that an approximation that neglects neutrino clustering as a source for nonlinear matter clustering predicts the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak position to 0.25% accuracy for redshifts 1 < z < 3, justifying the use of LPT for BAO reconstruction in upcoming surveys. We release a modified version of the public Copter code which includes the additional physics discussed in the paper.
  • Oscillons are long-lived, localized excitations of nonlinear scalar fields which may be copiously produced during preheating after inflation, leading to a possible oscillon-dominated phase in the early Universe. For example, this can happen after axion monodromy inflation, on which we run our simulations. We investigate the stochastic gravitational wave background associated with an oscillon-dominated phase. An isolated oscillon is spherically symmetric and does not radiate gravitational waves, and we show that the flux of gravitational radiation generated between oscillons is also small. However, a significant stochastic gravitational wave background may be generated during preheating itself (i.e, when oscillons are forming), and in this case the characteristic size of the oscillons is imprinted on the gravitational wave power spectrum, which has multiple, distinct peaks.
  • Remarkable observational advances have established a compelling cross-validated model of the Universe. Yet, two key pillars of this model -- dark matter and dark energy -- remain mysterious. Sky surveys that map billions of galaxies to explore the `Dark Universe', demand a corresponding extreme-scale simulation capability; the HACC (Hybrid/Hardware Accelerated Cosmology Code) framework has been designed to deliver this level of performance now, and into the future. With its novel algorithmic structure, HACC allows flexible tuning across diverse architectures, including accelerated and multi-core systems. On the IBM BG/Q, HACC attains unprecedented scalable performance -- currently 13.94 PFlops at 69.2% of peak and 90% parallel efficiency on 1,572,864 cores with an equal number of MPI ranks, and a concurrency of 6.3 million. This level of performance was achieved at extreme problem sizes, including a benchmark run with more than 3.6 trillion particles, significantly larger than any cosmological simulation yet performed.
  • Oscillons are massive, long-lived, localized excitations of a scalar field. We show that in a large class of well-motivated single-field models, inflation is followed by self-resonance, leading to copious oscillon generation and a lengthy period of oscillon domination. These models are characterized by an inflaton potential which has a quadratic minimum and is shallower than quadratic away from the minimum. This set includes both string monodromy models and a class of supergravity inspired scenarios, and is in good agreement with the current central values of the concordance cosmology parameters. We assume that the inflaton is weakly coupled to other fields, so as not to quickly drain energy from the oscillons or prevent them from forming. An oscillon-dominated universe has a greatly enhanced primordial power spectrum on very small scales relative to that seen with a quadratic potential, possibly leading to novel gravitational effects in the early universe.
  • Traditional numerical techniques for solving time-dependent partial-differential-equation (PDE) initial-value problems (IVPs) store a truncated representation of the function values and some number of their time derivatives at each time step. Although redundant in the dx->0 limit, what if spatial derivatives were also stored? This paper presents an iterated, multipoint differential transform method (IMDTM) for numerically evolving PDE IVPs. Using this scheme, it is demonstrated that stored spatial derivatives can be propagated in an efficient and self-consistent manner; and can effectively contribute to the evolution procedure in a way which can confer several advantages, including aiding solution verification. Lastly, in order to efficiently implement the IMDTM scheme, a generalized finite-difference stencil formula is derived which can take advantage of multiple higher-order spatial derivatives when computing even-higher-order derivatives. As is demonstrated, the performance of these techniques compares favorably to other explicit evolution schemes in terms of speed, memory footprint and accuracy.
  • Analytical arguments suggest that a large class of scalar field potentials permit the existence of oscillons -- pseudo-stable, non-topological solitons -- in three spatial dimensions. In this paper we numerically explore oscillon solutions in three dimensions. We confirm the existence of these field configurations as solutions to the Klein-Gorden equation in an expanding background, and verify the predictions of Amin and Shirokoff for the characteristics of individual oscillons for their model. Further, we demonstrate that significant numbers of oscillons can be generated via fragmentation of the inflaton condensate, consistent with the analysis of Amin. These emergent oscillons can easily dominate the post-inflationary universe. Finally, both analytic and numerical results suggest that oscillons are stable on timescales longer than the post-inflationary Hubble time. Consequently, the post-inflationary universe can contain an effective matter-dominated phase, during which it is dominated by localized concentrations of scalar field matter.
  • PSpectRe is a C++ program that uses Fourier-space pseudo-spectral methods to evolve interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. PSpectRe is optimized for the analysis of parametric resonance in the post-inflationary universe, and provides an alternative to finite differencing codes, such as Defrost and LatticeEasy. PSpectRe has both second- (Velocity-Verlet) and fourth-order (Runge-Kutta) time integrators. Given the same number of spatial points and/or momentum modes, PSpectRe is not significantly slower than finite differencing codes, despite the need for multiple Fourier transforms at each timestep, and exhibits excellent energy conservation. Further, by computing the post-resonance equation of state, we show that in some circumstances PSpectRe obtains reliable results while using substantially fewer points than a finite differencing code. PSpectRe is designed to be easily extended to other problems in early-universe cosmology, including the generation of gravitational waves during phase transitions and pre-inflationary bubble collisions. Specific applications of this code will be pursued in future work.
  • The differential transformation method (DTM) enables the easy construction of a power-series solution to a nonlinear differential equation. The exponentiation operation has not been specifically addressed in the DTM literature, and constructing it iteratively is suboptimal. The recurrence for exponentiating a power series by J.C.P. Miller provides a concise implementation of exponentiation by a positive integer for DTM. An equally-concise implementation of the exponential function is also provided.
  • Inspired by theories such as Loop Quantum Gravity, a class of stochastic graph dynamics was studied in an attempt to gain a better understanding of discrete relational systems under the influence of local dynamics. Unlabeled graphs in a variety of initial configurations were evolved using local rules, similar to Pachner moves, until they reached a size of tens of thousands of vertices. The effect of using different combinations of local moves was studied and a clear relationship can be discerned between the proportions used and the properties of the evolved graphs. Interestingly, simulations suggest that a number of relevant properties possess asymptotic stability with respect to the size of the evolved graphs.