• Using a series of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations we show that during the rapid growth of high-redshift (z > 5) galaxies, reserves of molecular gas are consumed over a time-scale of 300Myr, almost independent of feedback scheme. We find that there exists no such simple relation for the total gas fractions of these galaxies, with little correlation between gas fractions and specific star formation rates. The bottleneck or limiting factor in the growth of early galaxies is in converting infalling gas to cold star-forming gas. Thus, we find that the majority of high redshift dwarf galaxies are effectively in recession, with demand (of star formation) never rising to meet supply (of gas), irrespective of the baryonic feedback physics modelled. We conclude that the basic assumption of self-regulation in galaxies - that they can adjust total gas consumption within a Hubble time - does not apply for the dwarf galaxies thought to be responsible for providing most UV photons to reionize the high redshift Universe. We demonstrate how this rapid molecular time-scale improves agreement between semi-analytic model predictions of the early Universe and observed stellar mass functions.
  • The formation and evolution of galaxies with low neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) masses, M$_{\rm HI}$$<$10$^{8}h^{-2}$M$_{\odot}$, are affected by host dark matter halo mass and photoionisation feedback from the UV background after the end of reionization. We study how the physical processes governing the formation of galaxies with low HI mass are imprinted on the distribution of neutral hydrogen in the Universe using the hierarchical galaxy formation model, GALFORM. We calculate the effect on the correlation function of changing the HI mass detection threshold at redshifts $0 \le z \le 0.5$. We parameterize the clustering as $\xi(r)=(r/r_{0})^{-\gamma}$ and we find that including galaxies with M$_{\rm HI}$$<$10$^{8}h^{-2}$M$_{\odot}$ increases the clustering amplitude $r_{0}$ and slope $\gamma$ compared to samples of higher HI masses. This is due to these galaxies with low HI masses typically being hosted by haloes with masses greater than 10$^{12}{h}^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$, and is in contrast to optically selected surveys for which the inclusion of faint, blue galaxies lowers the clustering amplitude. We show the HI mass function for different host dark matter halo masses and galaxy types (central or satellite) to interpret the values of $r_{0}$ and $\gamma$ of the clustering of HI-selected galaxies. We also predict the contribution of low HI mass galaxies to the 21cm intensity mapping signal. We calculate that a dark matter halo mass resolution better than $\sim$10$^{10}{h}^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ at redshifts higher than 0.5 is required in order to predict converged 21cm brightness temperature fluctuations.
  • The Detection of redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is a challenging task owing to strong foregrounds that dominate the signal. In this paper, we propose a general method, based on the delay spectrum approach, to extract HI power spectra that is applicable to tracking observations using an imaging radio interferometer (Delay Spectrum with Imaging Arrays (DSIA)). Our method is based on modelling the HI signal taking into account the impact of wide field effects such as the $w$-term which are then used as appropriate weights in cross-correlating the measured visibilities. Our method is applicable to any radio interferometer that tracks a phase center and could be utilized for arrays such as MWA, LOFAR, GMRT, PAPER and HERA. In the literature the delay spectrum approach has been implemented for near-redundant baselines using drift scan observations. In this paper we explore the scheme for non-redundant tracking arrays, and this is the first application of delay spectrum methodology to such data to extract the HI signal. We analyze 3 hours of MWA tracking data on the EoR1 field. We present both 2-dimensional ($k_\parallel,k_\perp$) and 1-dimensional (k) power spectra from the analysis. Our results are in agreement with the findings of other pipelines developed to analyse the MWA EoR data.
  • In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model which includes sources in both the main field-of-view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k_parallel modes by several percent relative to a model which only includes sources in the main field-of-view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. While small, a percent-level amount of foreground power is in itself more than enough to prevent recovery of any EoR signal from these modes. This result demonstrates that foreground subtraction for redshifted 21 cm experiments is truly a wide-field problem, and algorithms and simulations must extend beyond the main instrument field-of-view to potentially recover the full 21 cm power spectrum.
  • Redshifted 21cm measurements of the structure of ionised regions that grow during reionization promise to provide a new probe of early galaxy and structure formation. One of the challenges of modelling reionization is to account both for the sub-halo scale physics of galaxy formation and the regions of ionization on scales that are many orders of magnitude larger. To bridge this gap we first calculate the statistical relationship between ionizing luminosity and Mpc-scale overdensity using detailed models of galaxy formation computed using relatively small volume - ($\sim$100Mpc/$h$)$^{3}$, high resolution dark matter simulations. We then use a Monte-Carlo technique to apply this relationship to reionization of the intergalactic medium within large volume dark matter simulations - ($>$1Gpc/$h$)$^{3}$. The resulting simulations can be used to address the contribution of very large scale clustering of galaxies to the structure of reionization, and show that volumes larger than 500Mpc/$h$ are required to probe the largest reionization features mid-way through reionization. As an example application of our technique, we demonstrate that the predicted 21cm power spectrum amplitude and gradient could be used to determine the importance of supernovae feedback for early galaxy formation.
  • We explore the galaxy formation physics governing the low mass end of the HI mass function in the local Universe. Specifically, we predict the effects on the HI mass function of varying i) the strength of photoionisation feedback and the redshift of the end of the epoch of reionization, ii) the cosmology, iii) the supernovae feedback prescription, and iv) the efficiency of star formation. We find that the shape of the low-mass end of the HI mass function is most affected by the critical halo mass below which galaxy formation is suppressed by photoionisation heating of the intergalactic medium. We model the redshift dependence of this critical dark matter halo mass by requiring a match to the low-mass end of the HI mass function. The best fitting critical dark matter halo mass decreases as redshift increases in this model, corresponding to a circular velocity of $\sim 50 \, {\rm km \,s}^{-1}$ at $z=0$, $\sim 30 \, {\rm km\, s}^{-1}$ at $z \sim 1$ and $\sim 12 \, {\rm km \, s}^{-1}$ at $z=6$. We find that an evolving critical halo mass is required to explain both the shape and abundance of galaxies in the HI mass function below $M_{\rm HI} \sim 10^{8} h^{-2} {\rm M_{\odot}}$. The model makes specific predictions for the clustering strength of HI-selected galaxies with HI masses > $10^{6} h^{-2} {\rm M_{\odot}}$ and $> 10^{7} h^{-2} {\rm M_{\odot}}$ and for the relation between the HI and stellar mass contents of galaxies which will be testable with upcoming surveys with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders. We conclude that measurements of the HI mass function at $z \ge 0$ will lead to an improvement in our understanding of the net effect of photoionisation feedback on galaxy formation and evolution.
  • We confirm our recent prediction of the "pitchfork" foreground signature in power spectra of high-redshift 21 cm measurements where the interferometer is sensitive to large-scale structure on all baselines. This is due to the inherent response of a wide-field instrument and is characterized by enhanced power from foreground emission in Fourier modes adjacent to those considered to be the most sensitive to the cosmological H I signal. In our recent paper, many signatures from the simulation that predicted this feature were validated against Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data, but this key pitchfork signature was close to the noise level. In this paper, we improve the data sensitivity through the coherent averaging of 12 independent snapshots with identical instrument settings and provide the first confirmation of the prediction with a signal-to-noise ratio > 10. This wide-field effect can be mitigated by careful antenna designs that suppress sensitivity near the horizon. Simple models for antenna apertures that have been proposed for future instruments such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and the Square Kilometre Array indicate they should suppress foreground leakage from the pitchfork by ~40 dB relative to the MWA and significantly increase the likelihood of cosmological signal detection in these critical Fourier modes in the three-dimensional power spectrum.
  • Detection of 21~cm emission of HI from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z>6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the HI signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffuse emission near the horizon as a significant contributing factor, even on wide antenna spacings that usually represent structures on small scales. For signals entering through the primary field of view, compact emission dominates the foreground contamination. These two mechanisms imprint a characteristic "pitchfork" signature on the "foreground wedge" in Fourier delay space. Based on these results, we propose that selective down-weighting of data based on antenna spacing and time can mitigate foreground contamination substantially by a factor ~100 with negligible loss of sensitivity.
  • The correlation between 21cm fluctuations and galaxies is sensitive to the astrophysical properties of the galaxies that drove reionization. Thus, detailed measurements of the cross-power spectrum and its evolution could provide a powerful measurement both of the properties of early galaxies and the process of reionization. In this paper, we study the evolution of the cross-power spectrum between 21cm emission and galaxies using a model which combines the hierarchical galaxy formation model GALFORM implemented within the Millennium-II dark matter simulation, with a semi-numerical scheme to describe the resulting ionization structure. We find that inclusion of different feedback processes changes the cross-power spectrum shape and amplitude. In particular, the feature in the cross-power spectrum corresponding to the size of ionized regions is significantly affected by supernovae feedback. We calculate predicted observational uncertainties of the cross-correlation coefficient based on specifications of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) combined with galaxy surveys of varying area and depth. We find that the cross-power spectrum could be detected over several square degrees of galaxy survey with galaxy redshift errors less than 0.1.
  • The observed power spectrum of redshifted 21cm fluctuations is known to be sensitive to the astrophysical properties of the galaxies that drove reionization. Thus, detailed measurements of the 21cm power spectrum and its evolution could lead to measurements of the properties of early galaxies that are otherwise inaccessible. In this paper, we study the effect of mass and redshift dependent escape fractions of ionizing radiation on the ability of forthcoming experiments to constrain galaxy formation via the redshifted 21cm power spectrum. We use a model for reionization which combines the hierarchical galaxy formation model GALFORM implemented within the Millennium-II dark matter simulation, with a semi-numerical scheme to describe the resulting ionization structure. Using this model we show that the structure and distribution of ionised regions at fixed neutral fraction, and hence the slope and amplitude of the 21 cm power spectrum, is dependent on the variation of ionising photon escape fraction with galaxy mass and redshift. However, we find that the influence of the unknown escape fraction and its evolution is smaller than the dominant astrophysical effect provided by SNe feedback strength in high redshift galaxies. The unknown escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies is therefore unlikely to prevent measurement of the properties of high redshift star formation using observations of the 21cm power spectrum.
  • We investigate the impact of feedback - from supernovae (SNe), active galactic nuclei (AGN) and a photo-ionizing background at high redshifts - on the neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) mass function, the $b_{\rm J}$ band luminosity function, and the spatial clustering of these galaxies at $z$=0. We use a version of the semi-analytical galaxy formation model GALFORM that calculates self-consistently the amount of HI in a galaxy as a function of cosmic time and links its star formation rate to its mass of molecular hydrogen (H$_2$). We find that a systematic increase or decrease in the strength of SNe feedback leads to a systematic decrease or increase in the amplitudes of the luminosity and HI mass functions, but has little influence on their overall shapes. Varying the strength of AGN feedback influences only the numbers of the brightest or most HI massive galaxies, while the impact of varying the strength of photo-ionization feedback is restricted to changing the numbers of the faintest or least HI massive galaxies.Our results suggest that the HI mass function is a more sensitive probe of the consequences of cosmological reionization for galaxy formation than the luminosity function. We find that increasing the strength of any of the modes of feedback acts to weaken the clustering strength of galaxies, regardless of their HI-richness. In contrast, weaker AGN feedback has little effect on the clustering strength whereas weaker SNe feedback increases the clustering strength of HI-poor galaxies more strongly than HI-rich galaxies. These results indicate that forthcoming HI surveys on next generation radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders will be exploited most fruitfully as part of multiwavelength survey campaigns.
  • Understanding the epoch of reionization and the properties of the first galaxies represents an important goal for modern cosmology. The structure of reionization, and hence the observed power spectrum of redshifted 21cm fluctuations are known to be sensitive to the astrophysical properties of the galaxies that drove reionization. Thus, detailed measurements of the 21cm power spectrum and its evolution could lead to measurements of the properties of early galaxies that are otherwise inaccessible. In this paper, we make predictions for the ionised structure during reionization and the 21cm power spectrum based on detailed models of galaxy formation. We combine the semi-analytic GALFORM model implemented within the Millennium-II dark matter simulation, with a semi-numerical scheme to describe the resulting ionization structure. Using these models we show that the details of SNe and radiative feedback affect the structure and distribution of ionised regions, and hence the slope and amplitude of the 21 cm power spectrum. These results indicate that forthcoming measurements of the 21cm power-spectrum could be used to uncover details of early galaxy formation. We find that the strength of SNe feedback is the dominant effect governing the evolution of structure during reionization. In particular we show SNe feedback to be more important than radiative feedback, the presence of which we find does not influence either the total stellar mass or overall ionising photon budget. Thus, if SNe feedback is effective at suppressing star formation in high redshift galaxies, we find that photoionization feedback does not lead to self-regulation of the reionization process as has been thought.
  • Star-forming galaxies which are too faint to be detected individually produce intensity fluctuations in the cosmic background light. This contribution needs to be taken into account as a foreground when using the primordial signal to constrain cosmological parameters. The extragalactic fluctuations are also interesting in their own right as they depend on the star formation history of the Universe and the way in which this connects with the formation of cosmic structure. We present a new framework which allows us to predict the occupation of dark matter haloes by star-forming galaxies and uses this information, in conjunction with an N-body simulation of structure formation, to predict the power spectrum of intensity fluctuations in the infrared background. We compute the emission from galaxies at far-infrared, millimetre and radio wavelengths. Our method gives accurate predictions for the clustering of galaxies both for the one halo and two halo terms. We illustrate our new framework using a previously published model which reproduces the number counts and redshift distribution of galaxies selected by their emission at $850\,\mu$m. Without adjusting any of the model parameters, the predictions show encouraging agreement at high frequencies and on small angular scales with recent estimates of the extragalactic fluctuations in the background made from early data analysed by the Planck Collaboration. There are, however, substantial discrepancies between the model predictions and observations on large angular scales and at low frequencies, which illustrates the usefulness of the intensity fluctuations as a constraint on galaxy formation models.
  • The distribution of cold gas in dark matter haloes is driven by key processes in galaxy formation: gas cooling, galaxy mergers, star formation and reheating of gas by supernovae. We compare the predictions of four different galaxy formation models for the spatial distribution of cold gas. We find that satellite galaxies make little contribution to the abundance or clustering strength of cold gas selected samples, and are far less important than they are in optically selected samples. The halo occupation distribution function of present-day central galaxies with cold gas mass > 10^9 h^-1 Msun is peaked around a halo mass of ~ 10^11 h^-1 Msun, a scale that is set by the AGN suppression of gas cooling. The model predictions for the projected correlation function are in good agreement with measurements from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey. We compare the effective volume of possible surveys with the Square Kilometre Array with those expected for a redshift survey in the near-infrared. Future redshift surveys using neutral hydrogen emission will be competitive with the most ambitious spectroscopic surveys planned in the near-infrared.