• We report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of a very large star-forming Lyman Break galaxy, G6025, at z_spec=3.721. G6025 subtends ~20 kpc in physical extent, and is very UV-luminous (~5L* at z~4) and young (~140 Myr). Despite its unusual size and luminosity, the stellar population parameters and dust reddening (M_star~M* (z=4), and E(B-V)~0.15) estimated from the integrated light, are similar to those of smaller galaxies at comparable redshifts. The ground-based morphology and spectroscopy show two dominant components, both located off-center, embedded in more diffuse emission. We speculate that G6025 may be a scaled-up version of chain galaxies seen in deep HST imaging, or alternatively, a nearly equal-mass merger involving two super-L* galaxies in its early stage. G6025 lies close to but not within a known massive protocluster at z=3.78. We find four companions within a distance of < 6 Mpc from G6025, two of which lie within 1.6 Mpc. While the limited sensitivity of the existing spectroscopy does not allow us to robustly characterize the local environment of G6025, it likely resides in a locally overdense environment. The luminosity, size, and youth of G6025 make it uniquely suited to study the early formation of massive galaxies in the universe.
  • We present a new technique to measure multi-wavelength "Super-deblended" photometry from highly confused images, which we apply to Herschel and ground-based far-infrared (FIR) and (sub-)millimeter (mm) data in the northern field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). There are two key novelties. First, starting with a large database of deep Spitzer 24{\mu}m and VLA 20cm detections that are used to define prior positions for fitting the FIR/submm data, we perform an active selection of useful priors independently at each frequency band, moving from less to more confused bands. Exploiting knowledge of redshift and all available photometry, we identify hopelessly faint priors that we remove from the fitting pool. This approach significantly reduces blending degeneracies and allows reliable photometry to be obtained for galaxies in FIR+mm bands. Second, we obtain well-behaved, nearly Gaussian flux density uncertainties, individually tailored to all fitted priors in each band. This is done by exploiting extensive simulations that allow us to calibrate the conversion of formal fitting uncertainties to realistic uncertainties depending on quantities directly measurable. We achieve deeper detection limits with high fidelity measurements and uncertainties at FIR+mm bands. As an illustration of the utility of these measurements, we identify 70 galaxies with z>3 and reliable FIR+mm detections. We present new constraints on the cosmic star formation rate density at 3<z<6, finding a significant contribution from z>3 dusty galaxies that are missed by optical-to-near-infrared color selection. Photometric measurements for 3306 priors, including over 1000 FIR+mm detections are released publicly with our catalog.
  • The C III] 1907,1909 emission doublet has been proposed as an alternative to Lyman-alpha in redshift confirmations of galaxies at z > 6 since it is not attenuated by the largely neutral intergalactic medium at these redshifts and is believed to be strong in the young, vigorously star-forming galaxies present at these early cosmic times. We present a statistical sample of 17 C III]-emitting galaxies beyond z~1.5 using 30 hour deep VLT/MUSE integral field spectroscopy covering 2 square arcminutes in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) and Ultra Deep Field (UDF), achieving C III] sensitivities of ~2e-17 erg/s/cm^2 in the HDFS and ~7e-18 erg/s/cm^2 in the UDF. The rest-frame equivalent widths range from 2 to 19 Angstroms. These 17 galaxies represent ~3% of the total sample of galaxies found between 1.5 < z < 4. They also show elevated star formation rates, lower dust attenuation, and younger mass-weighted ages than the general population of galaxies at the same redshifts. Combined with deep slitless grism spectroscopy from the HST/WFC3 in the UDF, we can tie the rest-frame ultraviolet C III] emission to rest-frame optical emission lines, namely [O III] 5007, finding a strong correlation between the two. Down to the flux limits that we observe (~1e-18 erg/s/cm^2 with the grism data in the UDF), all objects with a rest-frame [O III] 4959,5007 equivalent width in excess of 250 Angstroms, the so-called Extreme Emission Line Galaxies, have detections of C III] in our MUSE data. More detailed studies of the C III]-emitting population at these intermediate redshifts will be crucial to understand the physical conditions in galaxies at early cosmic times and to determine the utility of C III] as a redshift tracer.
  • We present the MUSE Hubble Ultra Deep Survey, a mosaic of nine MUSE fields covering 90\% of the entire HUDF region with a 10-hour deep exposure time, plus a deeper 31-hour exposure in a single 1.15 arcmin2 field. The improved observing strategy and advanced data reduction results in datacubes with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution (0.65 arcsec at 7000 A) and accurate astrometry (0.07 arcsec rms). We compare the broadband photometric properties of the datacubes to HST photometry, finding a good agreement in zeropoint up to mAB=28 but with an increasing scatter for faint objects. We have investigated the noise properties and developed an empirical way to account for the impact of the correlation introduced by the 3D drizzle interpolation. The achieved 3 sigma emission line detection limit for a point source is 1.5 and 3.1 10-19 erg.s-1.cm-2 for the single ultra-deep datacube and the mosaic, respectively. We extracted 6288 sources using an optimal extraction scheme that takes the published HST source locations as prior. In parallel, we performed a blind search of emission line galaxies using an original method based on advanced test statistics and filter matching. The blind search results in 1251 emission line galaxy candidates in the mosaic and 306 in the ultradeep datacube, including 72 sources without HST counterparts (mAB>31). In addition 88 sources missed in the HST catalog but with clear HST counterparts were identified. This data set is the deepest spectroscopic survey ever performed. In just over 100 hours of integration time, it provides nearly an order of magnitude more spectroscopic redshifts compared to the data that has been accumulated on the UDF over the past decade. The depth and high quality of these datacubes enables new and detailed studies of the physical properties of the galaxy population and their environments over a large redshift range.
  • Recent theoretical models suggest that the early phase of galaxy formation could involve an epoch when galaxies are gas-rich but inefficient at forming stars: a "dark galaxy" phase. Here, we report the results of our MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) survey for dark galaxies fluorescently illuminated by quasars at $z>3$. Compared to previous studies which are based on deep narrow-band (NB) imaging, our integral field survey provides a nearly uniform sensitivity coverage over a large volume in redshift space around the quasars as well as full spectral information at each location. Thanks to these unique features, we are able to build control samples at large redshift distances from the quasars using the same data taken under the same conditions. By comparing the rest-frame equivalent width (EW$_{0}$) distributions of the Ly$\alpha$ sources detected in proximity to the quasars and in control samples, we detect a clear correlation between the locations of high EW$_{0}$ objects and the quasars. This correlation is not seen in other properties such as Ly$\alpha$ luminosities or volume overdensities, suggesting the possible fluorescent nature of at least some of these objects. Among these, we find 6 sources without continuum counterparts and EW$_{0}$ limits larger than $240\,\mathrm{\AA}$ that are the best candidates for dark galaxies in our survey at $z>3.5$. The volume densities and properties, including inferred gas masses and star formation efficiencies, of these dark galaxy candidates are similar to previously detected candidates at $z\approx2.4$ in NB surveys. Moreover, if the most distant of these are fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, our results also provide a lower limit of $t=60$ Myr on the quasar lifetime.
  • We present an initial result from the 12CO (J=1-0) survey of 79 galaxies in 62 local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG and ULIRG) systems obtained using the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. This is the systematic 12CO (J=1-0) survey of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRGs Survey (GOALS) sample. The molecular gas mass of the sample ranges 2.2 x 10^8 - 7.0 x 10^9 Msun within the central several kiloparsecs subtending 15" beam. A method to estimate a size of a CO gas distribution is introduced, which is combined with the total CO flux in the literature. The method is applied to a part of our sample and we find that the median CO radius is 1-4 kpc. From the early stage to the late stage of mergers, we find that the CO size decreases while the median value of the molecular gas mass in the central several kpc region is constant. Our results statistically support a scenario where molecular gas inflows towards the central region from the outer disk, to replenish gas consumed by starburst, and that such a process is common in merging LIRGs.
  • Cosmological simulations suggest that most of the matter in the Universe is distributed along filaments connecting galaxies. Illuminated by the cosmic UV background (UVB), these structures are expected to glow in fluorescent Lyman alpha emission with a Surface Brightness (SB) that is well below current observational limits for individual detections. Here, we perform a stacking analysis of the deepest MUSE/VLT data using three-dimensional regions (subcubes) with orientations determined by the position of neighbouring Lyman alpha galaxies (LAEs) at 3<z<4. Our method should increase the probability of detecting filamentary Lyman alpha emission, provided that these structures are Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). By stacking 390 oriented subcubes we reach a 2 sigma sensitivity level of SB ~ 0.44e-20 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2 in an aperture of 1 arcsec^2 x 6.25 Angstrom, which is three times below the expected fluorescent Lyman alpha signal from the Haardt-Madau 2012 (HM12) UVB at z~3.5. No detectable emission is found on intergalactic scales, implying that at least two thirds of our subcubes do not contain oriented LLSs for a HM12 UVB. On the other hand, significant emission is detected in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) of galaxies in the direction of the neighbours. The signal is stronger for galaxies with a larger number of neighbours and appears to be independent of any other galaxy properties such as luminosity, redshift and neighbour distance. We estimate that preferentially oriented satellite galaxies cannot contribute significantly to this signal, suggesting instead that gas densities in the CGM are typically larger in the direction of neighbouring galaxies on cosmological scales.
  • We present the results from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaging in the [NII] 205 micron fine-structure line (hereafter [NII]) and the underlying continuum of BRI 1202-0725, an interacting galaxy system at $z =$ 4.7, consisting of an optical QSO, a sub-millimeter galaxy (SMG) and two Lyman-$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs), all within $\sim$25 kpc of the QSO. We detect the QSO and SMG in both [NII] and continuum. At the $\sim$$1"$ (or 6.6 kpc) resolution, both QSO and SMG are resolved in [NII], with the de-convolved major axes of $\sim$9 and $\sim$14 kpc, respectively. In contrast, their continuum emissions are much more compact and unresolved even at an enhanced resolution of $\sim$$0.7"$. The ratio of the [NII] flux to the existing CO (7$-$6) flux is used to constrain the dust temperature ($T_{\rm dust}$) for a more accurate determination of the FIR luminosity $L_{\rm FIR}$. Our best estimated $T_{\rm dust}$ equals $43 (\pm 2)$ K for both galaxies (assuming an emissivity index $\beta = 1.8$). The resulting $L_{\rm CO(7-6)}/L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios are statistically consistent with that of local luminous infrared galaxies, confirming that $L_{\rm CO(7-6)}$ traces the star formation (SF) rate (SFR) in these galaxies. We estimate that the on-going SF of the QSO (SMG) has a SFR of 5.1 $(6.9) \times 10^3 M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ ($\pm$ 30%) assuming Chabrier initial mass function, takes place within a diameter (at half maximum) of 1.3 (1.5) kpc, and shall consume the existing 5 $(5) \times 10^{11} M_{\odot}$ of molecular gas in 10 $(7) \times 10^7$ years.
  • We report the detection of diffuse Ly$\alpha$ emission, or Ly$\alpha$ halos (LAHs), around star-forming galaxies at $z\approx3.78$ and $2.66$ in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bo\"otes field. Our samples consist of a total of $\sim$1400 galaxies, within two separate regions containing spectroscopically confirmed galaxy overdensities. They provide a unique opportunity to investigate how the LAH characteristics vary with host galaxy large-scale environment and physical properties. We stack Ly$\alpha$ images of different samples defined by these properties and measure their median LAH sizes by decomposing the stacked Ly$\alpha$ radial profile into a compact galaxy-like and an extended halo-like component. We find that the exponential scale-length of LAHs depends on UV continuum and Ly$\alpha$ luminosities, but not on Ly$\alpha$ equivalent widths or galaxy overdensity parameters. The full samples, which are dominated by low UV-continuum luminosity Ly$\alpha$ emitters ($M_{\rm UV} \gtrsim -21$), exhibit LAH sizes of 5$\,-\,6\,$kpc. However, the most UV- or Ly$\alpha$-luminous galaxies have more extended halos with scale-lengths of 7$\,-\,9\,$kpc. The stacked Ly$\alpha$ radial profiles decline more steeply than recent theoretical predictions that include the contributions from gravitational cooling of infalling gas and from low-level star formation in satellites. On the other hand, the LAH extent matches what one would expect for photons produced in the galaxy and then resonantly scattered by gas in an outflowing envelope. The observed trends of LAH sizes with host galaxy properties suggest that the physical conditions of the circumgalactic medium (covering fraction, HI column density, and outflow velocity) change with halo mass and/or star-formation rates.
  • (Abridged) Our sensitive ($\sigma_{\rm n} = 572\,{\rm nJy\,beam}^{-1}$), high-resolution (FWHM $\theta_{1/2} = 220\,{\rm mas} \approx2\mathrm{\,kpc~at~}z\gtrsim1$) 10$\,$GHz image covering a single Karl G.~Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) primary beam (FWHM $\Theta_{1/2} = 4.25'$) in the GOODS-N field contains 32 sources with $S_{\rm p}\gtrsim2\,\mu{\rm Jy~beam}^{-1}$ and optical and/or near-infrared (OIR) counterparts. Most are about as large as the star-forming regions that power them. Their median FWHM major axis is $\langle\theta_{\rm M} \rangle=167\pm32\,{\rm mas} \approx 1.2\pm0.28\,{\rm kpc}$ with rms scatter 91 was $\approx$ 0.79 kpc. In units of the effective radius $r_{\rm e}$ that encloses half their flux, these radio sizes are $\langle r_{\rm e}\rangle = 69\pm13{\rm mas} \approx \pm114\mathrm{\,pc}$ and have rms scatter $38\mathrm{\,mas}\approx324\mathrm{\,pc}$. These sizes are smaller than those measured at lower radio frequencies, but agree with dust emission sizes measured at mm/sub-mm wavelengths and extinction-corrected H$\alpha$ sizes. We made a low-resolution ($\theta_{1/2}=1.0"$) image with $\approx10\times$ better brightness sensitivity to detect extended sources and measure matched-resolution spectral indices $\alpha_{1.4}^{10}$. It contains 6 new sources with $S_{\rm p}\gtrsim3.9\,\mu{\rm Jy~beam}^{-1}$ and OIR counterparts. The median redshift of all 38 sources is $1.24\pm0.15$. The 19 sources with 1.4$\,$GHz counterparts have median spectral index $-0.74\pm0.10$ with rms scatter $0.35$. Including upper limits on $\alpha$ for sources not detected at 1.4$\,$GHz flattens the median to $\gtrsim-0.61$, suggesting that the $\mu$Jy radio sources at higher redshifts, and hence selected at higher rest-frame frequencies, may have flatter spectra. If the non-thermal spectral index is -0.85, the median thermal fraction at rest-frame frequency 20$\,$GHz is $\gtrsim$48%.
  • We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-$L_{\rm{}IR}$ envelope of the scatter in the $L_{\rm{}IR}-L'_{\rm{}CO}$ relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of $\sim$ 1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ($M_{\rm{}H2}$/$M_*$) is consistent with earlier measurements of main sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor $\sim$2-5$\times$ smaller than those based on CO. Accounting for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • We present new observations of the field containing the z=3.786 protocluster, PC217.96+32.3. We confirm that it is one of the largest and most overdense high-redshift structures known. Such structures are rare even in the largest cosmological simulations. We used the Mayall/MOSAIC1.1 imaging camera to image a 1.2x0.6 deg area (~150x75 comoving Mpc) surrounding the protocluster's core and discovered 165 candidate Lyman Alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) and 788 candidate Lyman Break galaxies (LBGs). There are at least 2 overdense regions traced by the LAEs, the largest of which shows an areal overdensity in its core (i.e., within a radius of 2.5 comoving Mpc) of 14+/-7 relative to the average LAE spatial density in the imaged field. Further, the average LAE spatial density in the imaged field is twice that derived by other field LAE surveys. Spectroscopy with Keck/DEIMOS yielded redshifts for 164 galaxies (79 LAEs and 85 LBGs); 65 lie at a redshift of 3.785+/-0.010. The velocity dispersion of galaxies near the core is 350+/-40 km/s, a value robust to selection effects. The overdensities are likely to collapse into systems with present-day masses of >10^{15} solar masses and >6x10^{14} solar masses. The low velocity dispersion may suggest a dynamically young protocluster. We find a weak trend between narrow-band (Lyman Alpha) luminosity and environmental density: the Lyman Alpha luminosity is enhanced on average by 1.35X within the protocluster core. There is no evidence that the Lyman Alpha equivalent width depends on environment. These suggest that star-formation and/or AGN activity is enhanced in the higher density regions of the structure. PC217.96+32.3 is a Coma cluster analog, witnessed in the process of formation.
  • We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic SED-based SFRs for z~2 galaxies. For this comparison we used 17 star-forming galaxies selected from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, with $3\sigma$ detections for H$\alpha$ and at least two IR bands (Spitzer/MIPS 24$\mu$m and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160$\mu$m, and in some cases Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500$\mu$m). The galaxies have total IR (8-1000$\mu$m) luminosities of $\sim10^{11.4}-10^{12.4}\,\textrm{L}_\odot$ and star-formation rates (SFRs) of $\sim30-250\,\textrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models - which include both stellar and dust emission - and compare the inferred SFRs with the SFR(H$\alpha$,H$\beta$) values corrected for dust attenuation using Balmer decrements. The two SFRs agree with a scatter of 0.17 dex. Our results imply that the Balmer decrement accurately predicts the obscuration of the nebular lines and can be used to robustly calculate SFRs for star-forming galaxies at z~2 with SFRs up to $\sim200\,\textrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We also use our data to assess SFR indicators based on modeling the UV-to-mid-IR SEDs or by adding SFR(UV) and SFR(IR), for which the latter is based on the mid-IR only or on the full IR SED. All these SFRs show a poorer agreement with SFR(H$\alpha$,H$\beta$) and in some cases large systematic biases are observed. Finally, we show that the SFR and dust attenuation derived from the UV-to-near-IR SED alone are unbiased when assuming a delayed exponentially declining star-formation history.
  • In this paper, we report our high-resolution ($0^{\prime\prime}.20\times0^{\prime\prime}.14$ or $\sim$$70\times49$ pc) observations of the CO(6-5) line emission, which probes warm and dense molecular gas, and the 434 $\mu$m dust continuum in the nuclear region of NGC 7130, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The CO line and dust continuum fluxes detected in our ALMA observations are $1230\pm74$ Jy km s$^{-1}$ and $814\pm52$ mJy, respectively, which account for 100% and 51% of their total respective fluxes. We find that the CO(6-5) and dust emissions are generally spatially correlated, but their brightest peaks show an offset of $\sim$70 pc, suggesting that the gas and dust emissions may start decoupling at this physical scale. The brightest peak of the CO(6-5) emission does not spatially correspond to the radio continuum peak, which is likely dominated by an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). This, together with our additional quantitative analysis, suggests that the heating contribution of the AGN to the CO(6-5) emission in NGC 7130 is negligible. The CO(6-5) and the extinction-corrected Pa-$\alpha$ maps display striking differences, suggestive of either a breakdown of the correlation between warm dense gas and star formation at linear scales of $<$100 pc or a large uncertainty in our extinction correction to the observed Pa-$\alpha$ image. Over a larger scale of $\sim$2.1\,kpc, the double-lobed structure found in the CO(6-5) emission agrees well with the dust lanes in the optical/near-infrared images.
  • We build a set of composite galaxy SEDs by de-redshifting and scaling multi-wavelength photometry from galaxies in the ZFOURGE survey, covering the CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS fields. From a sample of ~4000 K_s-band selected galaxies, we define 38 composite galaxy SEDs that yield continuous low-resolution spectra (R~45) over the rest-frame range 0.1-4 um. Additionally, we include far infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory to characterize the infrared properties of our diverse set of composite SEDs. From these composite SEDs we analyze the rest-frame UVJ colors, as well as the ratio of IR to UV light (IRX) and the UV slope ($\beta$) in the IRX$-\beta$ dust relation at 1<z<3. Blue star-forming composite SEDs show IRX and $\beta$ values consistent with local relations; dusty star-forming galaxies have considerable scatter, as found for local IR bright sources, but on average appear bluer than expected for their IR fluxes. We measure a tight linear relation between rest-frame UVJ colors and dust attenuation for star-forming composites, providing a direct method for estimating dust content from either (U-V) or (V-J) rest-frame colors for star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts.
  • We explore star-formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies based on the evolution of the star-formation rate stellar mass relation (SFR-M*). Using data from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) in combination with far-IR imaging from the Spitzer and Herschel observatories we measure the SFR-M* relation at 0.5 < z < 4. Similar to recent works we find that the average infrared SEDs of galaxies are roughly consistent with a single infrared template across a broad range of redshifts and stellar masses, with evidence for only weak deviations. We find that the SFR-M* relation is not consistent with a single power-law of the form SFR ~ M*^a at any redshift; it has a power-law slope of a~1 at low masses, and becomes shallower above a turnover mass (M_0) that ranges from 10^9.5 - 10^10.8 Msol, with evidence that M_0 increases with redshift. We compare our measurements to results from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations, and find general agreement in the slope of the SFR-M* relation albeit with systematic offsets. We use the evolving SFR-M* sequence to generate SFHs, finding that typical SFRs of individual galaxies rise at early times and decline after reaching a peak. This peak occurs earlier for more massive galaxies. We integrate these SFHs to generate mass-growth histories and compare to the implied mass-growth from the evolution of the stellar mass function. We find that these two estimates are in broad qualitative agreement, but that there is room for improvement at a more detailed level. At early times the SFHs suggest mass-growth rates that are as much as 10x higher than inferred from the stellar mass function. However, at later times the SFHs under-predict the inferred evolution, as is expected in the case of additional growth due to mergers.
  • We have undertaken an ambitious program to visually classify all galaxies in the five CANDELS fields down to H<24.5 involving the dedicated efforts of 65 individual classifiers. Once completed, we expect to have detailed morphological classifications for over 50,000 galaxies up to z<4 over all the fields. Here, we present our detailed visual classification scheme, which was designed to cover a wide range of CANDELS science goals. This scheme includes the basic Hubble sequence types, but also includes a detailed look at mergers and interactions, the clumpiness of galaxies, $k$-corrections, and a variety of other structural properties. In this paper, we focus on the first field to be completed -- GOODS-S. The wide area coverage spanning the full field includes 7634 galaxies that have been classified by at least three different people. In the deep area of the field, 2534 galaxies have been classified by at least five different people at three different depths. With this paper, we release to the public all of the visual classifications in GOODS-S along with the GUI that we developed to classify galaxies. We find that the level of agreement among classifiers is good and depends on both the galaxy magnitude and the galaxy type, with disks showing the highest level of agreement and irregulars the lowest. A comparison of our classifications with the Sersic index and rest-frame colors shows a clear separation between disk and spheroid populations. Finally, we explore morphological k-corrections between the V-band and H-band observations and find that a small fraction (84 galaxies in total) are classified as being very different between these two bands. These galaxies typically have very clumpy and extended morphology or are very faint in the V-band.
  • Do spatial distributions of dust grains in galaxies have typical forms, as do spatial distributions of stars? We investigate whether or not the distributions resemble uniform foreground screens, as commonly assumed by the high-redshift galaxy community. We use rest-frame infrared, ultraviolet, and H$\alpha$ line luminosities of dust-poor and dusty galaxies at z ~ 0 and z ~ 1 to compare measured H$\alpha$ escape fractions with those predicted by the Calzetti attenuation formula. The predictions, based on UV escape fractions, overestimate the measured H$\alpha$ escape fractions for all samples. The interpretation of this result for dust-poor z ~ 0 galaxies is that regions with ionizing stars have more dust than regions with nonionizing UV-emitting stars. Dust distributions for these galaxies are nonuniform. The interpretation of the overestimates for dusty galaxies at both redshifts is less clear. If the attenuation formula is inapplicable to these galaxies, perhaps the disagreements are unphysical; perhaps dust distributions in these galaxies are uniform. If the attenuation formula does apply, then dusty galaxies have nonuniform dust distributions; the distributions are more uniform than they are in dust-poor galaxies. A broad range of H$\alpha$ escape fractions at a given UV escape fraction for z ~ 1 dusty galaxies, if real, indicates diverse dust morphologies and the implausibility of the screen assumption.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • We present the photometric properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered 48 DOGs with $i - K_\mathrm{s} > 1.2$ and $i - [22] > 7.0$, where $i$, $K_\mathrm{s}$, and [22] represent AB magnitude in the $i$-band, $K_\mathrm{s}$-band, and 22 $\mu$m, respectively, in the GAMA 14hr field ($\sim$ 9 deg$^2$). Among these objects, 31 ($\sim$ 65 %) show power-law spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the near-IR (NIR) and MIR regime, while the remainder show a NIR bump in their SEDs. Assuming that the redshift distribution for our DOGs sample is Gaussian, with mean and sigma $z$ = 1.99 $\pm$ 0.45, we calculated their total IR luminosity using an empirical relation between 22 $\mu$m luminosity and total IR luminosity. The average value of the total IR luminosity is (3.5 $\pm$ 1.1) $\times$ $10^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$, which classifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs). We also derived the total IR luminosity function (LF) and IR luminosity density (LD) for a flux-limited subsample of 18 DOGs with 22 $\mu$m flux greater than 3.0 mJy and with $i$-band magnitude brighter than 24 AB magnitude. The derived space density for this subsample is log $\phi$ = -6.59 $\pm$ 0.11 [Mpc$^{-3}$]. The IR LF for DOGs including data obtained from the literature is well fitted by a double-power law. The derived lower limit for the IR LD for our sample is $\rho_{\mathrm{IR}}$ $\sim$ 3.8 $\times$ 10$^7$ [L$_{\odot}$ Mpc$^{-3}$] and its contributions to the total IR LD, IR LD of all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and that of all DOGs are $>$ 3 %, $>$ 9 %, and $>$ 15 %, respectively.
  • To better characterize the global star formation (SF) activity in a galaxy, one needs to know not only the star formation rate (SFR) but also the rest-frame, far-infrared (FIR) color (e.g., the 60-to-100 $\mu$m color, $C(60/100)$] of the dust emission. The latter probes the average intensity of the dust heating radiation field and scales statistically with the effective SFR surface density in star-forming galaxies including (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies [(U)LIRGs]. To this end, we exploit here a new spectroscopic approach involving only two emission lines: CO\,(7$-$6) at 372 $\mu$m and [NII] at 205 $\mu$m. For local (U)LIRGs, the ratios of the CO (7$-$6) luminosity ($L_{\rm CO\,(7-6)}$) to the total infrared luminosity ($L_{\rm IR}$; 8$-$1000 $\mu$m) are fairly tightly distributed (to within $\sim$0.12 dex) and show little dependence on $C(60/100)$. This makes $L_{\rm CO\,(7-6)}$ a good SFR tracer, which is less contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) than $L_{\rm IR}$ and may also be much less sensitive to metallicity than $L_{\rm CO\,(1-0)}$. Furthermore, the logarithmic [NII] 205 $\mu$m to CO (7$-$6) luminosity ratio is fairly steeply (at a slope of $\sim$$-1.4$) correlated with $C(60/100)$, with a modest scatter ($\sim$0.23 dex). This makes it a useful estimator on $C(60/100)$ with an implied uncertainty of $\sim$0.15 [or $\lesssim$4 K in the dust temperature ($T_{\rm dust}$) in the case of a graybody emission with $T_{\rm dust} \gtrsim 30$ K and a dust emissivity index $\beta \ge 1$]. Our locally calibrated SFR and $C(60/100)$ estimators are shown to be consistent with the published data of (U)LIRGs of $z$ up to $\sim$6.5.
  • We present an analysis of the deepest Herschel images in four major extragalactic fields GOODS-North, GOODS-South, UDS and COSMOS obtained within the GOODS-Herschel and CANDELS-Herschel key programs. The picture provided by 10497 individual far-infrared detections is supplemented by the stacking analysis of a mass-complete sample of 62361 star-forming galaxies from the CANDELS-HST H band-selected catalogs and from two deep ground-based Ks band-selected catalogs in the GOODS-North and the COSMOS-wide fields, in order to obtain one of the most accurate and unbiased understanding to date of the stellar mass growth over the cosmic history. We show, for the first time, that stacking also provides a powerful tool to determine the dispersion of a physical correlation and describe our method called "scatter stacking" that may be easily generalized to other experiments. We demonstrate that galaxies of all masses from z=4 to 0 follow a universal scaling law, the so-called main sequence of star-forming galaxies. We find a universal close-to-linear slope of the logSFR-logM* relation with evidence for a flattening of the main sequence at high masses (log(M*/Msun) > 10.5) that becomes less prominent with increasing redshift and almost vanishes by z~2. This flattening may be due to the parallel stellar growth of quiescent bulges in star-forming galaxies. Within the main sequence, we measure a non varying SFR dispersion of 0.3 dex. The specific SFR (sSFR=SFR/M*) of star-forming galaxies is found to continuously increase from z=0 to 4. Finally we discuss the implications of our findings on the cosmic SFR history and show that more than 2/3 of present-day stars must have formed in a regime dominated by the main sequence mode. As a consequence we conclude that, although omnipresent in the distant Universe, galaxy mergers had little impact in shaping the global star formation history over the last 12.5 Gyr.
  • We present a new technique for overcoming confusion noise in deep far-infrared \Herschel space telescope images making use of prior information from shorter $\lambda<2$\micron wavelengths. For the deepest images obtained by \Herschels, the flux limit due to source confusion is about a factor of three brighter than the flux limit due to instrumental noise and (smooth) sky background. We have investigated the possibility of de-confusing simulated \Herschel PACS-160\micron images by using strong Bayesian priors on the positions and weak priors on the flux of sources. We find the blended sources and group them together and simultaneously fit their fluxes. We derive the posterior probability distribution function of fluxes subject to these priors through Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling by fitting the image. Assuming we can predict FIR flux of sources based on ultraviolet-optical part of their SEDs to within an order of magnitude, the simulations show that we can obtain reliable fluxes and uncertainties at least a factor of three fainter than the confusion noise limit of $3\sigma_{c} $=2.7 mJy in our simulated PACS-160 image. This technique could in principle be used to mitigate the effects of source confusion in any situation where one has prior information of positions and plausible fluxes of blended sources. For \Herschel, application of this technique will improve our ability to constrain the dust content in normal galaxies at high redshift.
  • The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a comprehensive, multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here we present the results of a multi-component, spectral decomposition analysis of the low resolution mid-IR Spitzer IRS spectra from 5-38um of 244 LIRG nuclei. The detailed fits and high quality spectra allow for characterization of the individual PAH features, warm molecular hydrogen emission, and optical depths for silicate dust grains and water ices. We find that starbursting LIRGs, which make up the majority of GOALS, are very consistent in their MIR properties (i.e. tau_9.7um, tau_ice, neon line and PAH feature ratios). However, as their PAH EQW decreases, usually an indicator of an increasingly dominant AGN, LIRGs cover a larger spread in these MIR parameters. The contribution from PAHs to the total L(IR) in LIRGs varies from 2-29% and LIRGs prior to their first encounter show higher L(PAH)/L(IR) ratios on average. We observe a correlation between the strength of the starburst (IR8) and the PAH fraction at 8um but not with the 7.7 to 11.3 PAH ratio, suggesting the fractional PDR emission, and not the overall grain properties, is associated with the rise in IR8 for galaxies off the starburst main sequence. We detect crystalline silicate features in 6% of the sample but only in the most obscured sources (s_9.7um < -1.24). Ice absorption features are observed in 11% (56%) of GOALS LIRGs (ULIRGs). Most GOALS LIRGs have L(H2)/L(PAH) ratios elevated above those observed for normal star-forming galaxies and exhibit a trend for increasing L(H2)/L(PAH) ratio with increasing L(H2). While star formation appears to be the dominant process responsible for exciting the H2 in most of the GOALS galaxies, a subset of LIRGs (10%) show excess H2 emission that is inconsistent with PDR models and may be excited by shocks or AGN-induced outflows.