• We report low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of Ni-Bi films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Highly anisotropic and twofold symmetric superconducting gaps are revealed in two distinct composites, Bi-rich NiBi3 and near-equimolar NixBi, both sharing quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. We further reveal axially elongated vortices in both phases, but Caroli-de Gennes-Matricon states solely within the vortex cores of NiBi3. Intriguingly, although the localized bound state splits energetically off at a finite distance ~10 nm away from a vortex center along the minor axis of elliptic vortex, no splitting is found along the major axis. We attribute the elongated vortices and unusual vortex behaviors to the combined effects of twofold superconducting gap and Fermi velocity. The findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the electron pairing and vortex matter in quasi-one-dimensional superconductors
  • Real-world relations among entities can often be observed and determined by different perspectives/views. For example, the decision made by a user on whether to adopt an item relies on multiple aspects such as the contextual information of the decision, the item's attributes, the user's profile and the reviews given by other users. Different views may exhibit multi-way interactions among entities and provide complementary information. In this paper, we introduce a multi-tensor-based approach that can preserve the underlying structure of multi-view data in a generic predictive model. Specifically, we propose structural factorization machines (SFMs) that learn the common latent spaces shared by multi-view tensors and automatically adjust the importance of each view in the predictive model. Furthermore, the complexity of SFMs is linear in the number of parameters, which make SFMs suitable to large-scale problems. Extensive experiments on real-world datasets demonstrate that the proposed SFMs outperform several state-of-the-art methods in terms of prediction accuracy and computational cost.
  • Newton's gravitational constant $G$ may vary with time at an extremely low level. The time variability of $G$ will affect the orbital motion of a millisecond pulsar in a binary system and cause a tiny difference between the orbital period-dependent measurement of the kinematic distance and the direct measurement of the annual parallax distance. PSR J0437$-$4715 is the nearest millisecond pulsar and the brightest at radio. To explore the feasibility of achieving a parallax distance accuracy of one light-year, comparable to the recent timing result, with the technique of differential astrometry, we searched for compact radio sources quite close to PSR J0437$-$4715. Using existing data from the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we detected two sources with flat spectra, relatively stable flux densities of 0.9 and 1.0 mJy at 8.4 GHz and separations of 13 and 45 arcsec. With a network consisting of the Long Baseline Array and the Kunming 40-m radio telescope, we found that both sources have a point-like structure and a brightness temperature of $\geq$10$^7$ K. According to these radio inputs and the absence of counterparts in the other bands, we argue that they are most likely the compact radio cores of extragalactic active galactic nuclei rather than Galactic radio stars. The finding of these two radio active galactic nuclei will enable us to achieve a sub-pc distance accuracy with the in-beam phase-referencing very-long-baseline interferometric observations and provide one of the most stringent constraints on the time variability of $G$ in the near future.
  • Determination of the pairing symmetry in monolayer FeSe films on SrTiO3 is a requisite for understanding the high superconducting transition temperature in this system, which has attracted intense theoretical and experimental studies but remains controversial. Here, by introducing several types of point defects in FeSe monolayer films, we conduct a systematic investigation on the impurity-induced electronic states by spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Ranging from surface adsorption, chemical substitution to intrinsic structural modification, these defects generate a variety of scattering strength, which renders new insights on the pairing symmetry.
  • Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy, we report the observation of topologically nontrivial superconductivity on a single material of \beta-Bi2Pd films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The superconducting gap associated with spinless odd-parity pairing opens on the surface and appears much larger than the bulk one due to the Dirac-fermion enhanced parity mixing of surface pair potential. Majorana zero modes (MZMs), supported by such superconducting states, are identified at magnetic vortices. The superconductivity and MZMs exhibit resistance to nonmagnetic defects, characteristic of time-reversal-invariant topological superconductors. Our results demonstrate a simple platform to generate, manipulate and braid MZMs for quantum computation.
  • By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of BiO and SrO planes of Bi2Sr2CuO6+{\delta} (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (VHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} (Bi-2212) superconductor where VHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants ({\delta} in the formulas) as a primary cause for the occurrence of VHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.
  • We report on the observation of high-temperature ($T_\textrm{c}$) superconductivity and magnetic vortices in single-unit-cell FeSe films on anatase TiO$_2$(001) substrate by using scanning tunneling microscopy. A systematic study and engineering of interfacial properties has clarified the essential roles of substrate in realizing the high-$T_\textrm{c}$ superconductivity, probably via interface-induced electron-phonon coupling enhancement and charge transfer. By visualizing and tuning the oxygen vacancies at the interface, we find their very limited effect on the superconductivity, which excludes interfacial oxygen vacancies as the primary source for charge transfer between the substrate and FeSe films. Our findings have placed severe constraints on any microscopic model for the high-$T_\textrm{c}$ superconductivity in FeSe-related heterostructures.
  • The pairing mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains the biggest unresolved mystery in condensed matter physics. To solve the problem, one of the most effective approaches is to investigate directly the superconducting CuO2 layers. Here, by growing CuO2 monolayer films on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} substrates, we identify two distinct and spatially separated energy gaps centered at the Fermi energy, a smaller U-like gap and a larger V-like gap on the films, and study their interactions with alien atoms by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The newly discovered U-like gap exhibits strong phase coherence and is immune to scattering by K, Cs and Ag atoms, suggesting its nature as a nodeless superconducting gap in the CuO2 layers, whereas the V-like gap agrees with the well-known pseudogap state in the underdoped regime. Our results support an s-wave superconductivity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta}, which, we propose, originates from the modulation-doping resultant two-dimensional hole liquid confined in the CuO2 layers.
  • Understanding the mechanism of high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity in cuprates has been hindered by the apparent complexity of their multilayered crystal structure. Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on layer-by-layer probing of the electronic structures of all ingredient planes (BiO, SrO, CuO2) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing technique. We show that the well-known pseudogap (PG) feature observed by STM is inherently a property of the BiO planes and thus irrelevant directly to Cooper pairing. The SrO planes exhibit an unexpected Van Hove singularity near the Fermi level, while the CuO2 planes are exclusively characterized by a smaller gap inside the PG. The small gap becomes invisible near Tc, which we identify as the superconducting gap. The above results constitute severe constraints on any microscopic model for high Tc superconductivity in cuprates.
  • Background: Cancers are highly heterogeneous with different subtypes. These subtypes often possess different genetic variants, present different pathological phenotypes, and most importantly, show various clinical outcomes such as varied prognosis and response to treatment and likelihood for recurrence and metastasis. Recently, integrative genomics (or panomics) approaches are often adopted with the goal of combining multiple types of omics data to identify integrative biomarkers for stratification of patients into groups with different clinical outcomes. Results: In this paper we present a visual analytic system called Interactive Genomics Patient Stratification explorer (iGPSe) which significantly reduces the computing burden for biomedical researchers in the process of exploring complicated integrative genomics data. Our system integrates unsupervised clustering with graph and parallel sets visualization and allows direct comparison of clinical outcomes via survival analysis. Using a breast cancer dataset obtained from the The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, we are able to quickly explore different combinations of gene expression (mRNA) and microRNA features and identify potential combined markers for survival prediction. Conclusions: Visualization plays an important role in the process of stratifying given population patients. Visual tools allowed for the selection of possibly features across various datasets for the given patient population. We essentially made a case for visualization for a very important problem in translational informatics.
  • Heterostructure based interface engineering has been proved an effective method for finding new superconducting systems and raising superconductivity transition temperature (TC). In previous work on one unit-cell (UC) thick FeSe films on SrTiO3 (STO) substrate, a superconducting-like energy gap as large as 20 meV, was revealed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) further revealed a nearly isotropic gap of above 15 meV, which closes at a temperature of ~ 65 K. If this transition is indeed the superconducting transition, then the 1-UC FeSe represents the thinnest high TC superconductor discovered so far. However, up to date direct transport measurement of the 1-UC FeSe films has not been reported, mainly because growth of large scale 1-UC FeSe films is challenging and the 1-UC FeSe films are too thin to survive in atmosphere. In this work, we successfully prepared 1-UC FeSe films on insulating STO substrates with non-superconducting FeTe protection layers. By direct transport and magnetic measurements, we provide definitive evidence for high temperature superconductivity in the 1-UC FeSe films with an onset TC above 40 K and a extremely large critical current density JC ~ 1.7*106 A/cm2 at 2 K. Our work may pave the way to enhancing and tailoring superconductivity by interface engineering.
  • Topological insulators are a new class of materials, that exhibit robust gapless surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry. The interplay between such symmetry-protected topological surface states and symmetry-broken states (e.g. superconductivity) provides a platform for exploring novel quantum phenomena and new functionalities, such as 1D chiral or helical gapless Majorana fermions, and Majorana zero modes which may find application in fault-tolerant quantum computation. Inducing superconductivity on topological surface states is a prerequisite for their experimental realization. Here by growing high quality topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ films on a d-wave superconductor Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ using molecular beam epitaxy, we are able to induce high temperature superconductivity on the surface states of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ films with a large pairing gap up to 15 meV. Interestingly, distinct from the d-wave pairing of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$, the proximity-induced gap on the surface states is nearly isotropic and consistent with predominant s-wave pairing as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our work could provide a critical step toward the realization of the long sought-after Majorana zero modes.
  • We prepare single layer potassium-doped iron selenide (110) film by molecular beam expitaxy. Such a single layer film can be viewed as a two-dimensional system composed of weakly coupled two-leg iron ladders. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals that superconductivity is developed in this two-leg ladder system. The superconducting gap is similar to that of the multi-layer films. However, the Fermi surface topology given by first-principles calculation is remarkably different from that of the bulk materials. Our results suggest that superconducting pairing is very short-ranged or takes place rather locally in iron-chalcogenides. The superconductivity is most likely driven by electron-electron correlation effect and is insensitive to the change of Fermi surfaces.
  • We elucidate the existing controversies in the newly discovered K-doped iron selenide (KxFe2-ySe2-z) superconductors. The stoichiometric KFe2Se2 with \surd2\times\surd2 charge ordering was identified as the parent compound of KxFe2-ySe2-z superconductor using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The superconductivity is induced in KFe2Se2 by either Se vacancies or interacting with the anti-ferromagnetic K2Fe4Se5 compound. Totally four phases were found to exist in KxFe2-ySe2-z: parent compound KFe2Se2, superconducting KFe2Se2 with \surd2\times\surd5 charge ordering, superconducting KFe2Se2-z with Se vacancies and insulating K2Fe4Se5 with \surd5\times\surd5 Fe vacancy order. The phase separation takes place at the mesoscopic scale under standard molecular beam epitaxy condition.
  • Searching for superconducting materials with high transition temperature (TC) is one of the most exciting and challenging fields in physics and materials science. Although superconductivity has been discovered for more than 100 years, the copper oxides are so far the only materials with TC above 77 K, the liquid nitrogen boiling point. Here we report an interface engineering method for dramatically raising the TC of superconducting films. We find that one unit-cell (UC) thick films of FeSe grown on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) show signatures of superconducting transition above 50 K by transport measurement. A superconducting gap as large as 20 meV of the 1 UC films observed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) suggests that the superconductivity could occur above 77 K. The occurrence of superconductivity is further supported by the presence of superconducting vortices under magnetic field. Our work not only demonstrates a powerful way for finding new superconductors and for raising TC, but also provides a well-defined platform for systematic study of the mechanism of unconventional superconductivity by using different superconducting materials and substrates.
  • Alkali-doped iron selenide is the latest member of high Tc superconductor family, and its peculiar characters have immediately attracted extensive attention. We prepared high-quality potassium-doped iron selenide (KxFe2-ySe2) thin films by molecular beam epitaxy and unambiguously demonstrated the existence of phase separation, which is currently under debate, in this material using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The stoichiometric superconducting phase KFe2Se2 contains no iron vacancies, while the insulating phase has a \surd5\times\surd5 vacancy order. The iron vacancies are shown always destructive to superconductivity in KFe2Se2. Our study on the subgap bound states induced by the iron vacancies further reveals a magnetically-related bipartite order in the superconducting phase. These findings not only solve the existing controversies in the atomic and electronic structures in KxFe2-ySe2, but also provide valuable information on understanding the superconductivity and its interplay with magnetism in iron-based superconductors.