• In this paper, we propose a new regularization technique called "functional SCAD". We then combine this technique with the smoothing spline method to develop a smooth and locally sparse (i.e., zero on some sub-regions) estimator for the coefficient function in functional linear regression. The functional SCAD has a nice shrinkage property that enables our estimating procedure to identify the null subregions of the coefficient function without over shrinking the non-zero values of the coefficient function. Additionally, the smoothness of our estimated coefficient function is regularized by a roughness penalty rather than by controlling the number of knots. Our method is more theoretically sound and is computationally simpler than the other available methods. An asymptotic analysis shows that our estimator is consistent and can identify the null region with the probability tending to one. Furthermore, simulation studies show that our estimator has superior numerical performance. Finally, the practical merit of our method is demonstrated on two real applications.
  • This paper is motivated by the problem of integrating multiple sources of measurements. We consider two multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) channels, a primary channel and a secondary channel, with dependent input signals. The primary channel carries the signal of interest, and the secondary channel carries a signal that shares a joint distribution with the primary signal. The problem of particular interest is designing the secondary channel matrix, when the primary channel matrix is fixed. We formulate the problem as an optimization problem, in which the optimal secondary channel matrix maximizes an information-based criterion. An analytical solution is provided in a special case. Two fast-to-compute algorithms, one extrinsic and the other intrinsic, are proposed to approximate the optimal solutions in general cases. In particular, the intrinsic algorithm exploits the geometry of the unit sphere, a manifold embedded in Euclidean space. The performances of the proposed algorithms are examined through a simulation study. A discussion of the choice of dimension for the secondary channel is given.
  • We consider the problem of selecting covariates in spatial linear models with Gaussian process errors. Penalized maximum likelihood estimation (PMLE) that enables simultaneous variable selection and parameter estimation is developed and, for ease of computation, PMLE is approximated by one-step sparse estimation (OSE). To further improve computational efficiency, particularly with large sample sizes, we propose penalized maximum covariance-tapered likelihood estimation (PMLE$_{\mathrm{T}}$) and its one-step sparse estimation (OSE$_{\mathrm{T}}$). General forms of penalty functions with an emphasis on smoothly clipped absolute deviation are used for penalized maximum likelihood. Theoretical properties of PMLE and OSE, as well as their approximations PMLE$_{\mathrm{T}}$ and OSE$_{\mathrm{T}}$ using covariance tapering, are derived, including consistency, sparsity, asymptotic normality and the oracle properties. For covariance tapering, a by-product of our theoretical results is consistency and asymptotic normality of maximum covariance-tapered likelihood estimates. Finite-sample properties of the proposed methods are demonstrated in a simulation study and, for illustration, the methods are applied to analyze two real data sets.
  • Object Oriented Data Analysis is a new area in statistics that studies populations of general data objects. In this article we consider populations of tree-structured objects as our focus of interest. We develop improved analysis tools for data lying in a binary tree space analogous to classical Principal Component Analysis methods in Euclidean space. Our extensions of PCA are analogs of one dimensional subspaces that best fit the data. Previous work was based on the notion of tree-lines. In this paper, a generalization of the previous tree-line notion is proposed: k-tree-lines. Previously proposed tree-lines are k-tree-lines where k=1. New sub-cases of k-tree-lines studied in this work are the 2-tree-lines and tree-curves, which explain much more variation per principal component than tree-lines. The optimal principal component tree-lines were computable in linear time. Because 2-tree-lines and tree-curves are more complex, they are computationally more expensive, but yield improved data analysis results. We provide a comparative study of all these methods on a motivating data set consisting of brain vessel structures of 98 subjects.
  • This study introduces a new method of visualizing complex tree structured objects. The usefulness of this method is illustrated in the context of detecting unexpected features in a data set of very large trees. The major contribution is a novel two-dimensional graphical representation of each tree, with a covariate coded by color. The motivating data set contains three dimensional representations of brain artery systems of 105 subjects. Due to inaccuracies inherent in the medical imaging techniques, issues with the reconstruction algo- rithms and inconsistencies introduced by manual adjustment, various discrepancies are present in the data. The proposed representation enables quick visual detection of the most common discrepancies. For our driving example, this tool led to the modification of 10% of the artery trees and deletion of 6.7%. The benefits of our cleaning method are demonstrated through a statistical hypothesis test on the effects of aging on vessel structure. The data cleaning resulted in improved significance levels.
  • The active field of Functional Data Analysis (about understanding the variation in a set of curves) has been recently extended to Object Oriented Data Analysis, which considers populations of more general objects. A particularly challenging extension of this set of ideas is to populations of tree-structured objects. We develop an analog of Principal Component Analysis for trees, based on the notion of tree-lines, and propose numerically fast (linear time) algorithms to solve the resulting optimization problems. The solutions we obtain are used in the analysis of a data set of 73 individuals, where each data object is a tree of blood vessels in one person's brain.
  • Object oriented data analysis is the statistical analysis of populations of complex objects. In the special case of functional data analysis, these data objects are curves, where standard Euclidean approaches, such as principal component analysis, have been very successful. Recent developments in medical image analysis motivate the statistical analysis of populations of more complex data objects which are elements of mildly non-Euclidean spaces, such as Lie groups and symmetric spaces, or of strongly non-Euclidean spaces, such as spaces of tree-structured data objects. These new contexts for object oriented data analysis create several potentially large new interfaces between mathematics and statistics. This point is illustrated through the careful development of a novel mathematical framework for statistical analysis of populations of tree-structured objects.