• Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are an important building block for linear, nonlinear and quantum optical experiments. In such experiments, independent control of coupling rates to different modes can lead to improved conversion efficiencies and greater flexibility in generation of non-classical states based on parametric down conversion. In this work, we introduce a scheme which enables selective out-coupling of WGMs belonging to a specific polarization family, while the orthogonally polarized modes remain largely unperturbed. Our technique utilizes material birefringence in both the resonator and coupler such that a negative (positive) birefringence allows selective coupling to TE (TM) polarized WGMs. We formulate a new coupling condition suitable for describing the case where the refractive indices of the resonator and the coupler are almost the same, from which we derive the criterion for polarization-selective coupling. We experimentally demonstrate our proposed method using a lithium niobate disk resonator coupled to a lithium niobate prism, where we show a 22dB suppression of coupling to TM modes relative to TE modes.
  • We present our experiments on refractometric sensing with ultrahigh-Q, crystalline, birefringent magnesium fluoride (MgF$_2$) whispering gallery mode resonators. The difference to fused silica which is most commonly used for sensing experiments is the small refractive index of MgF$_2$ which is very close to that of water. Compared to fused silica this leads to more than 50% longer evanescent fields and a 4.25 times larger sensitivity. Moreover the birefringence amplifies the sensitivity difference between TM and TE type modes which will enhance sensing experiments based on difference frequency measurements. We estimate the performance of our resonators and compare them with fused silica theoretically and present experimental data showing the interferometrically measured evanescent decay and the sensitivity of mm-sized MgF$_2$ whispering gallery mode resonators immersed in water. They show reasonable agreement with the developed theory. Furthermore, we observe stable Q factors in water well above $1 \times 10^8$.