• The Beyond Horndeski class of alternative gravity theories allow for Self-accelerating de-Sitter cosmologies with no need for a cosmological constant. This makes them viable alternatives to $\Lambda$CDM and so testing their small-scale predictions against General Relativity is of paramount importance. These theories generically predict deviations in both the Newtonian force law and the gravitational lensing of light inside extended objects. Therefore, by simultaneously fitting the X-ray and lensing profiles of galaxy clusters new constraints can be obtained. In this work, we apply this methodology to the stacked profiles of 58 high-redshift ($ 0.1<z<1.2$) clusters using X-ray surface brightness profiles from the XMM Cluster Survey and weak lensing profiles from CFHTLenS. By performing a multi-parameter Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, we are able to place new constraints on the parameters governing deviations from Newton's law $\Upsilon_{1}=-0.11^{+0.93}_{-0.67}$ and light bending $\Upsilon_{2}=-0.22^{+1.22}_{-1.19}$. Both constraints are consistent with General Relativity, for which $\Upsilon_{1}=\Upsilon_{2}=0$. We present here the first observational constraints on $\Upsilon_{2}$, as well as the first extragalactic measurement of both parameters.
  • We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: $0.2 < z < 0.4$) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: $0.43 <z <0.7$) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark-matter halos of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between ${\rm log_{10}} (M_{180}/M_{\odot}) = 13-15$. Our directly measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fit alpha-index of 0.91$\pm$0.08 and $1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04}$ for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. and Parejko et al. In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.
  • We use two new hydrodynamical simulations of $\Lambda$CDM and $f(R)$ gravity to test the methodology used by Wilcox et al. 2015 (W15) in constraining the effects of a fifth force on the profiles of clusters of galaxies. We construct realistic simulated stacked weak lensing and X-ray surface brightness cluster profiles from these cosmological simulations, and then use these data projected along various lines-of-sight to test the spherical symmetry of our stacking procedure. We also test the applicability of the NFW profile to model weak lensing profiles of clusters in $f(R)$ gravity. Finally, we test the validity of the analytical model developed in W15 against the simulated profiles. Overall, we find our methodology is robust and broadly agrees with these simulated data. We also apply our full Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis from W15 to our simulated X-ray and lensing profiles, providing consistent constraints on the modified gravity parameters as obtained from the real cluster data, e.g. for our $\Lambda$CDM simulation we obtain $|f_{\rm{R}0}| < 8.3 \times 10^{-5}$ (95% CL), which is in good agreement with the W15 measurement of $|f_{\rm{R}0}| < 6 \times 10^{-5}$. Overall, these tests confirm the power of our methodology which can now be applied to larger cluster samples available with the next generation surveys.
  • We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
  • The chameleon gravity model postulates the existence of a scalar field that couples with matter to mediate a fifth force. If it exists, this fifth force would influence the hot X-ray emitting gas filling the potential wells of galaxy clusters. However, it would not influence the clusters' weak lensing signal. Therefore, by comparing X-ray and weak lensing profiles, one can place upper limits on the strength of a fifth force. This technique has been attempted before using a single, nearby cluster (Coma, $z=0.02$). Here we apply the technique to the stacked profiles of 58 clusters at higher redshifts ($0.1<z<1.2$), including 12 new to the literature, using X-ray data from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) and weak lensing data from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). Using a multi-parameter MCMC analysis, we constrain the two chameleon gravity parameters ($\beta$ and $\phi_{\infty}$). Our fits are consistent with general relativity, not requiring a fifth force. In the special case of $f(R)$ gravity (where $\beta = \sqrt{1/6}$), we set an upper limit on the background field amplitude today of $|f_{\rm{R0}}| < 6 \times 10^{-5}$ (95% CL). This is one of the strongest constraints to date on $|f_{\rm{R0}}|$ on cosmological scales. We hope to improve this constraint in future by extending the study to hundreds of clusters using data from the Dark Energy Survey.