• This paper introduces WaveNet, a deep neural network for generating raw audio waveforms. The model is fully probabilistic and autoregressive, with the predictive distribution for each audio sample conditioned on all previous ones; nonetheless we show that it can be efficiently trained on data with tens of thousands of samples per second of audio. When applied to text-to-speech, it yields state-of-the-art performance, with human listeners rating it as significantly more natural sounding than the best parametric and concatenative systems for both English and Mandarin. A single WaveNet can capture the characteristics of many different speakers with equal fidelity, and can switch between them by conditioning on the speaker identity. When trained to model music, we find that it generates novel and often highly realistic musical fragments. We also show that it can be employed as a discriminative model, returning promising results for phoneme recognition.
  • This paper introduces a general and flexible framework for F0 and aperiodicity (additive non periodic component) analysis, specifically intended for high-quality speech synthesis and modification applications. The proposed framework consists of three subsystems: instantaneous frequency estimator and initial aperiodicity detector, F0 trajectory tracker, and F0 refinement and aperiodicity extractor. A preliminary implementation of the proposed framework substantially outperformed (by a factor of 10 in terms of RMS F0 estimation error) existing F0 extractors in tracking ability of temporally varying F0 trajectories. The front end aperiodicity detector consists of a complex-valued wavelet analysis filter with a highly selective temporal and spectral envelope. This front end aperiodicity detector uses a new measure that quantifies the deviation from periodicity. The measure is less sensitive to slow FM and AM and closely correlates with the signal to noise ratio.
  • Acoustic models based on long short-term memory recurrent neural networks (LSTM-RNNs) were applied to statistical parametric speech synthesis (SPSS) and showed significant improvements in naturalness and latency over those based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). This paper describes further optimizations of LSTM-RNN-based SPSS for deployment on mobile devices; weight quantization, multi-frame inference, and robust inference using an {\epsilon}-contaminated Gaussian loss function. Experimental results in subjective listening tests show that these optimizations can make LSTM-RNN-based SPSS comparable to HMM-based SPSS in runtime speed while maintaining naturalness. Evaluations between LSTM-RNN- based SPSS and HMM-driven unit selection speech synthesis are also presented.