• A measure of quantum non-Markovianity for an open system dynamics, based on revivals of the distinguishability between system states, has been introduced in the literature using the trace distance as quantifier for distinguishability. Recently it has been suggested to use as measure for the distinguishability of quantum states the trace norm of Helstrom matrices, given by weighted differences of statistical operators. Here we show that this new approach, which generalizes the original one, is consistent with the interpretation of information flow between the system and its environment associated to the original definition. To this aim we prove a bound on the growth of the external information, that is information which cannot be accessed by performing measurements on the system only, as quantified by means of the Helstrom matrix. We further demonstrate by means of example that it is of relevance in generalizing schemes for the local detection of initial correlations based on the increase of internal information. Finally we exploit this viewpoint to show the optimality of a previously introduced strategy for the local detection of quantum correlations.
  • Mixing dynamical maps describing open quantum systems can lead from Markovian to non-Markovian processes. Being surprising and counter-intuitive, this result has been used as argument against characterization of non-Markovianity in terms of information exchange. Here, we demonstrate that, quite the contrary, mixing can be understood in a natural way which is fully consistent with existing theories of memory effects. In particular, we show how mixing-induced non-Markovianity can be interpreted in terms of the distinguishability of quantum states, system-environment correlations and the information flow between system and environment.
  • Quantum discord in a bipartite system can be dynamically revealed and quantified through purely local operations on one of the two subsystems. To achieve this, the local detection method harnesses the influence of initial correlations on the reduced dynamics of an interacting bipartite system. This article's aim is to provide an accessible introduction to this method and to review recent theoretical and experimental progress.
  • The detailed characterization of non-trivial coherence properties of composite quantum systems of increasing size is an indispensable prerequisite for scalable quantum computation, as well as for understanding of nonequilibrium many-body physics. Here we show how autocorrelation functions in an interacting system of phonons as well as the quantum discord between distinct degrees of freedoms can be extracted from a small controllable part of the system. As a benchmark, we show this in chains of up to 42 trapped ions, by tracing a single phonon excitation through interferometric measurements of only a single ion in the chain. We observe the spreading and partial refocusing of the excitation in the chain, even on a background of thermal excitations. We further show how this local observable reflects the dynamical evolution of quantum discord between the electronic state and the vibrational degrees of freedom of the probe ion.
  • Trapped atomic ions enable a precise quantification of the flow of information between internal and external degrees of freedom by employing a non-Markovianity measure [H.-P. Breuer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 210401 (2009)]. We reveal that the nature of projective measurements in quantum mechanics leads to a fundamental, nontrivial bias in this measure. We observe and study the functional dependence of this bias to permit a demonstration of applications of local quantum probing. An extension of our approach can act as a versatile reference, relevant for understanding complex systems.
  • We modify the path integral representation of exciton transport in open quantum systems such that an exact description of the quantum fluctuations around the classical evolution of the system is possible. As a consequence, the time evolution of the system observables is obtained by calculating the average of a stochastic difference equation which is weighted with a product of pseudo-probability density functions. From the exact equation of motion one can clearly identify the terms that are also present if we apply the truncated Wigner approximation. This description of the problem is used as a basis for the derivation of a new approximation, whose validity goes beyond the truncated Wigner approximation. To demonstrate this we apply the formalism to a donor-acceptor transport model.
  • We extend the Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique to the determination of multitime correlation functions of open quantum systems. The correlation functions are expressed in terms of certain multitime homogeneous and inhomogeneous memory kernels for which suitable equations of motion are derived. We show that under the condition of finite memory times these equations can be used to determine the memory kernels by employing an exact stochastic unraveling of the full system-environment dynamics. The approach thus allows to combine exact stochastic methods, feasible for short times, with long-time master equation simulations. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by numerical simulations of 2D-spectra for a donor-acceptor model, and by comparison of the results with those obtained from the reduced hierarchy equations of motion. We further show that the formalism is also applicable to the time evolution of a periodically driven two-level system initially in equilibrium with its environment.
  • We show that the spreading of the center-of-mass density of ultracold attractively interacting bosons can become superballistic in the presence of decoherence, via single-, two- and/or three-body losses. In the limit of weak decoherence, we analytically solve the numerical model introduced in [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063616 (2015)]. The analytical predictions allow us to identify experimentally accessible parameter regimes for which we predict superballistic spreading of the center-of-mass density. Ultracold attractive Bose gases form weakly bound molecules; quantum matter-wave bright solitons. Our computer-simulations combine ideas from classical field methods ("truncated Wigner") and piecewise deterministic stochastic processes. While the truncated Wigner approach to use an average over classical paths as a substitute for a quantum superposition is often an uncontrolled approximation, here it predicts the exact root-mean-square width when modeling an expanding Gaussian wave packet. In the superballistic regime, the leading-order of the spreading of the center-of-mass density can thus be modeled as a quantum superposition of classical Gaussian random walks in velocity space.
  • The measurement of correlations between different degrees of freedom is an important, but in general extremely difficult task in many applications of quantum mechanics. Here, we report an all-optical experimental detection and quantification of quantum correlations between the polarization and the frequency degrees of freedom of single photons by means of local operations acting only on the polarization degree of freedom. These operations only require experimental control over an easily accessible two-dimensional subsystem, despite handling strongly mixed quantum states comprised of a continuum of orthogonal frequency states. Our experiment thus represents a photonic realization of a scheme for the local detection of quantum correlations in a truly infinite-dimensional continuous-variable system, which excludes an efficient finite-dimensional truncation.
  • We establish a direct connection of quantum Markovianity of an open quantum system to its classical counterpart by generalizing the criterion based on the information flow. Here, the flow is characterized by the time evolution of Helstrom matrices, given by the weighted difference of statistical operators, under the action of the quantum dynamical evolution. It turns out that the introduced criterion is equivalent to P-divisibility of a quantum process, namely divisibility in terms of positive maps, which provides a direct connection to classical Markovian stochastic processes. Moreover, it is shown that similar mathematical representations as those found for the original trace distance based measure hold true for the associated, generalized measure for quantum non-Markovianity. That is, we prove orthogonality of optimal states showing a maximal information backflow and establish a local and universal representation of the measure. We illustrate some properties of the generalized criterion by means of examples.
  • Brownian motion is ballistic on short time scales and diffusive on long time scales. Our theoretical investigations indicate that one can observe the exact opposite - an "anomaleous diffusion process" where initially diffusive motion becomes ballistic on longer time scales - in an ultracold atom system with a size comparable to macromolecules. This system is a quantum matter-wave bright soliton subject to decoherence via three-particle losses for which we investigate the center-of-mass motion. Our simulations show that such unusual center-of-mass dynamics should be observable on experimentally accessible time scales.
  • The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markov process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modelled by a dynamical semigroup with a generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence and correlations. Here, recent results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This article further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments on the detection, quantification and control of non-Markovian quantum dynamics are also discussed.
  • We present a scheme allowing to access the squeezing parameter of multimode fields by means of the dynamics of nonlocal quantum probes. The model under consideration is composed of two two-level systems which are coupled locally to an environment consisting of nonlocally correlated field modes given by two-mode Gaussian states. Introducing independently switchable interactions, one observes revivals of nonlocal coherences of the two-qubit system which are unambiguously connected to the squeezing parameter of the Gaussian environmental states. Thus, the locally interacting two two-level systems represent a dynamical quantum probe for the squeezing in multimode fields. It is finally demonstrated that perfectly reviving nonlocal coherences also persists for nonentangled correlated field modes and an explanation for this phenomenon is presented by connecting it to the correlation coefficient of the environmental coupling operators.
  • We show that the ground-state quantum correlations of an Ising model can be detected by monitoring the time evolution of a single spin alone, and that the critical point of a quantum phase transition is detected through a maximum of a suitably defined observable. A proposed implementation with trapped ions realizes an experimental probe of quantum phase transitions which is based on quantum correlations and scalable for large system sizes.
  • Successful implementation of several quantum information and communication protocols require distributing entangled pairs of quantum bits in reliable manner. While there exists a substantial amount of recent theoretical and experimental activities dealing with non-Markovian quantum dynamics, experimental application and verification of the usefulness of memory-effects for quantum information tasks is still missing. We combine these two aspects and show experimentally that a recently introduced concept of nonlocal memory effects allows to protect and distribute polarization entangled pairs of photons in efficient manner within polarization-maintaining (PM) optical fibers. The introduced scheme is based on correlating the environments, i.e. frequencies of the polarization entangled photons, before their physical distribution. When comparing to the case without nonlocal memory effects, we demonstrate at least 12-fold improvement in the channel, or fiber length, for preserving the highly-entangled initial polarization states of photons against dephasing.
  • We review the model of two qubits coupled locally to an environment which consists of nonlocally correlated field modes [Phys. Rev.Lett. 108, 210402 (2012)]. We derive the correct expressions for the reduced dynamics of the two-qubit system and demonstrate that strong nonlocal memory effects are indeed present for suitable initial EPR-type Gaussian environmental states.
  • The study of open quantum systems is important for fundamental issues of quantum physics as well as for technological applications such as quantum information processing. Recent developments in this field have increased our basic understanding on how non-Markovian effects influence the dynamics of an open quantum system, paving the way to exploit memory effects for various quantum control tasks. Most often, the environment of an open system is thought to act as a sink for the system information. However, here we demonstrate experimentally that a photonic open system can exploit the information initially held by its environment. Correlations in the environmental degrees of freedom induce nonlocal memory effects where the bipartite open system displays, counterintuitively, local Markovian and global non-Markovian character. Our results also provide novel methods to protect and distribute entanglement, and to experimentally quantify correlations in photonic environments.
  • Recently, we proposed a method for the local detection of quantum correlations on the basis of local measurements and state tomography at different instances in time [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 180402 (2011)]. The method allows for the detection of quantum discord in bipartite systems when access is restricted to only one of the subsystems. Here, we elaborate the details of this method and provide applications to specific physical models. In particular, we discuss the performance of the scheme for generic complex systems by investigating thermal equilibrium states corresponding to randomly generated Hamiltonians. Moreover, we formulate an ergodicity-like hypothesis which links the time average to the analytically obtained average over the group of unitary operators equipped with the Haar measure.
  • We obtain exact analytic expressions for a class of functions expressed as integrals over the Haar measure of the unitary group in d dimensions. Based on these general mathematical results, we investigate generic dynamical properties of complex open quantum systems, employing arguments from ensemble theory. We further generalize these results to arbitrary eigenvalue distributions, allowing a detailed comparison of typical regular and chaotic systems with the help of concepts from random matrix theory. To illustrate the physical relevance and the general applicability of our results we present a series of examples related to the fields of open quantum systems and nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics. These include the effect of initial correlations, the average quantum dynamical maps, the generic dynamics of system-environment pure state entanglement and, finally, the equilibration of generic open and closed quantum systems.
  • We present a first-principles derivation of the Markovian semi-group master equation without invoking the rotating wave approximation (RWA). Instead we use a time coarse-graining approach which leaves us with a free timescale parameter, which we can optimize. Comparing this approach to the standard RWA-based Markovian master equation, we find that significantly better agreement is possible using the coarse-graining approach, for a three-level model coupled to a bath of oscillators, whose exact dynamics we can solve for at zero temperature. The model has the important feature that the RWA has a non-trivial effect on the dynamics of the populations. We show that the two different master equations can exhibit strong qualitative differences for the population of the energy eigenstates even for such a simple model. The RWA-based master equation misses an important feature which the coarse-graining based scheme does not. By optimizing the coarse-graining timescale the latter scheme can be made to approach the exact solution much more closely than the RWA-based master equation.
  • Exploiting previous results on Markovian dynamics and fluctuation theorems, we study the consequences of memory effects on single realizations of nonequilibrium processes within an open system approach. The entropy production along single trajectories for forward and backward processes is obtained with the help of a recently proposed classical-like non-Markovian stochastic unravelling, which is demonstrated to lead to a correction of the standard entropic fluctuation theorem. This correction is interpreted as resulting from the interplay between the information extracted from the system through measurements and the flow of information from the environment to the open system: Due to memory effects single realizations of a dynamical process are no longer independent, and their correlations fundamentally affect the behavior of entropy fluctuations.
  • We show that perfect quantum teleportation can be achieved with mixed photon polarization states when nonlocal memory effects influence the dynamics of the quantum system. The protocol is carried out with a pair of photons, whose initial maximally entangled state is destroyed by local decoherence prior to teleportation. It is demonstrated that the presence of strong nonlocal memory effects, which arise from initial correlations between the environments of the photons, allow to restore perfect teleportation. We further analyze how the amount of initial correlations within the environment affects the fidelity of the protocol, and find that for a moderate amount of correlations the fidelity exceeds the one of the previously known optimal teleportation protocol without memory effects. Our results show that memory effects can be exploited in harnessing noisy quantum systems for quantum communication and that non-Markovianity is a resource for quantum information tasks.
  • We study a recently proposed measure for the quantification of quantum non-Markovianity in the dynamics of open systems which is based on the exchange of information between the open system and its environment. This measure relates the degree of memory effects to certain optimal initial state pairs featuring a maximal flow of information from the environment back to the open system. We rigorously prove that the states of these optimal pairs must lie on the boundary of the space of physical states and that they must be orthogonal. This implies that quantum memory effects are maximal for states which are initially distinguishable with certainty, having a maximal information content. Moreover, we construct an explicit example which demonstrates that optimal quantum states need not be pure states.
  • Employing a recently proposed measure for quantum non-Markovianity, we carry out a systematic study of the size of memory effects in the spin-boson model for a large region of temperature and frequency cutoff parameters. The dynamics of the open system is described utilizing a second-order time-convolutionless master equation without the Markov or rotating wave approximations. While the dynamics is found to be strongly non-Markovian for low temperatures and cutoffs, in general, we observe a special regime favoring Markovian behavior. This effect is explained as resulting from a resonance between the system's transition frequency and the frequencies of the dominant environmental modes. We further demonstrate that the corresponding Redfield equation is capable of reproducing the characteristic features of the non-Markovian quantum behavior of the model.
  • The basic features of the dynamics of open quantum systems, such as the dissipation of energy, the decay of coherences, the relaxation to an equilibrium or non-equilibrium stationary state, and the transport of excitations in complex structures are of central importance in many applications of quantum mechanics. The theoretical description, analysis and control of non-Markovian quantum processes play an important role in this context. While in a Markovian process an open system irretrievably loses information to its surroundings, non-Markovian processes feature a flow of information from the environment back to the open system, which implies the presence of memory effects and represents the key property of non-Markovian quantum behavior. Here, we review recent ideas developing a general mathematical definition for non-Markoviantiy in the quantum regime and a measure for the degree of memory effects in the dynamics of open systems which are based on the exchange of information between system and environment. We further study the dynamical effects induced by the presence of system-environment correlations in the total initial state and design suitable methods to detect such correlations through local measurements on the open system.