• Scanamorphos is public software initially developed to post-process scan observations performed with the Herschel photometer arrays. This post-processing mainly consists in subtracting the total low-frequency noise (both its thermal and non-thermal components), masking cosmic ray hits, and projecting the data onto a map. Building upon the results obtained for P-ArT\'eMiS (the prototype of ArT\'eMiS), Herschel and then NIKA2 (a resident camera of the IRAM 30-m telescope operating at 1.25 and 2 mm), it has now been tailored to the ArT\'eMiS camera, an ESO and OSO P.I. instrument installed at the APEX 12-m telescope, demonstrating our initial claim that the software principles were directly transposable to scan observations made with other instruments, including from the ground, provided they entail sufficient redundancy. This document explains how the algorithm was modified to cope with the specificities of ArT\'eMiS observations and with the atmospheric emission at 350 and 450 $\mu$m, far dominating the instrumental drifts that were the only low-frequency noise component in Herschel data. Like in the original software, this was accomplished without assuming any noise model and without applying any Fourier-space filtering, by exploiting the redundancy built in the observations - taking advantage of the fact that each portion of the sky is sampled at multiple times by multiple bolometers. It remains an interactive software in the sense that the user is allowed to optionally visualize and control results at each intermediate step, but the processing is fully automated. It has been grafted onto the ArT\'eMiS pipeline, in charge of the formatting, calibration and projection of the data, that is described elsewhere.
  • Millimeter-wave continuum astronomy is today an indispensable tool for both general Astrophysics studies and Cosmology. General purpose, large field-of-view instruments are needed to map the sky at intermediate angular scales not accessible by the high-resolution interferometers and by the coarse angular resolution space-borne or ground-based surveys. These instruments have to be installed at the focal plane of the largest single-dish telescopes. In this context, we have constructed and deployed a multi-thousands pixels dual-band (150 and 260 GHz, respectively 2mm and 1.15mm wavelengths) camera to image an instantaneous field-of-view of 6.5arc-min and configurable to map the linear polarization at 260GHz. We are providing a detailed description of this instrument, named NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays 2), in particular focusing on the cryogenics, the optics, the focal plane arrays based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) and the readout electronics. We are presenting the performance measured on the sky during the commissioning runs that took place between October 2015 and April 2017 at the 30-meter IRAM (Institut of Millimetric Radio Astronomy) telescope at Pico Veleta. NIKA2 has been successfully deployed and commissioned, performing in-line with the ambitious expectations. In particular, NIKA2 exhibits FWHM angular resolutions of around 11 and 17.5 arc-seconds at respectively 260 and 150GHz. The NEFD (Noise Equivalent Flux Densities) demonstrated on the maps are, at these two respective frequencies, 33 and 8 mJy*sqrt(s). A first successful science verification run has been achieved in April 2017. The instrument is currently offered to the astronomical community during the coming winter and will remain available for at least the next ten years.
  • This paper deals with the design of tensorial modulated metasurfaces able to implement a general radiating aperture field distribution. A new aperture synthesis approach is introduced, based on local holography and variable impedance modulation. In particular, it is shown that tensorial metasurfaces can be used to generate general radiating distribution (phase and amplitude). In addition, a step by step algorithm is presented. In order to validate the method, several solutions are presented at 20 GHz which implement aperture distributions able to radiate different beams with general polarization.
  • JScanam is the default map-maker for Herschel/PACS photometer observations. Making use of the redundant information from multiple passages on the sky with different scanning directions, JScanam is able to remove the $1/f$ noise that severely affects PACS far-infrared maps, preserving at the same time point sources and real extended emission. The JScanam pipeline has been designed to run automatically on all kind of maps and astronomical environments, from Galactic star-forming clouds to deep cosmological fields. The results from the JScanam automatic pipeline can be easily inspected and downloaded from the Herschel Science Archive and the new ESA Sky interface.
  • We present a wide area (~ 8 x 8 kpc), sensitive map of CO (2-1) emission around the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Molecular gas extends far beyond the stellar disk, including emission associated with the well-known outflow as far as 3 kpc from M82's midplane. Kinematic signatures of the outflow are visible in both the CO and HI emission: both tracers show a minor axis velocity gradient and together they show double peaked profiles, consistent with a hot outflow bounded by a cone made of a mix of atomic and molecular gas. Combining our CO and HI data with observations of the dust continuum, we study the changing properties of the cold outflow as it leaves the disk. While H_2 dominates the ISM near the disk, the dominant phase of the cool medium changes as it leaves the galaxy and becomes mostly atomic after about a kpc. Several arguments suggest that regardless of phase, the mass in the cold outflow does not make it far from the disk; the mass flux through surfaces above the disk appears to decline with a projected scale length of ~ 1-2 kpc. The cool material must also end up distributed over a much wider angle than the hot outflow based on the nearly circular isophotes of dust and CO at low intensity and the declining rotation velocities as a function of height from the plane. The minor axis of M82 appears so striking at many wavelengths because the interface between the hot wind cavity and the cool gas produces Halpha, hot dust, PAH emission, and scattered UV light. We also show the level at which a face-on version of M82 would be detectable as an outflow based on unresolved spectroscopy. Finally, we consider multiple constraints on the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor, which must change across the galaxy but appears to be only a factor of ~ 2 lower than the Galactic value in the outflow.
  • The photometer section of SPIRE is one of the key instruments on board of Herschel. Its legacy depends very much on how well the scanmap observations that it carried out during the Herschel mission can be converted to high quality maps. In order to have a comprehensive assessment on the current status of SPIRE map-making, as well as to provide guidance for future development of the SPIRE scan-map data reduction pipeline, we carried out a test campaign on SPIRE map-making. In this report, we present results of the tests in this campaign.
  • Scanamorphos is one of the public softwares available to post-process scan observations performed with the Herschel photometer arrays. This post-processing mainly consists in subtracting the total low-frequency noise (both its thermal and non-thermal components), masking high-frequency artefacts such as cosmic ray hits, and projecting the data onto a map. Although it was developed for Herschel, it is also applicable with minimal adjustment to scan observations made with some other imaging arrays subjected to low-frequency noise, provided they entail sufficient redundancy; it was successfully applied to P-Artemis, an instrument operating on the APEX telescope. Contrary to matrix-inversion softwares and high-pass filters, Scanamorphos does not assume any particular noise model, and does not apply any Fourier-space filtering to the data, but is an empirical tool using purely the redundancy built in the observations -- taking advantage of the fact that each portion of the sky is sampled at multiple times by multiple bolometers. It is an interactive software in the sense that the user is allowed to optionally visualize and control results at each intermediate step, but the processing is fully automated. This paper describes the principles and algorithm of Scanamorphos and presents several examples of application.
  • Using infrared imaging from the Herschel Space Observatory, observed as part of the VNGS, we investigate the spatially resolved dust properties of the interacting Whirlpool galaxy system (NGC 5194 and NGC 5195), on physical scales of 1 kpc. Spectral energy distribution modelling of the new infrared images in combination with archival optical, near- through mid-infrared images confirms that both galaxies underwent a burst of star formation ~370-480 Myr ago and provides spatially resolved maps of the stellar and dust mass surface densities. The resulting average dust-to-stellar mass ratios are comparable to other spiral and spheroidal galaxies studied with Herschel, with NGC 5194 at log M(dust)/M(star)= -2.5+/-0.2 and NGC 5195 at log M(dust)/M(star)= -3.5+/-0.3. The dust-to-stellar mass ratio is constant across NGC 5194 suggesting the stellar and dust components are coupled. In contrast, the mass ratio increases with radius in NGC 5195 with decreasing stellar mass density. Archival mass surface density maps of the neutral and molecular hydrogen gas are also folded into our analysis. The gas-to-dust mass ratio, 94+/-17, is relatively constant across NGC 5194. Somewhat surprisingly, we find the dust in NGC 5195 is heated by a strong interstellar radiation field, over 20 times that of the ISRF in the Milky Way, resulting in relatively high characteristic dust temperatures (~30 K). This post-starburst galaxy contains a substantial amount of low-density molecular gas and displays a gas-to-dust ratio (73+/-35) similar to spiral galaxies. It is unclear why the dust in NGC 5195 is heated to such high temperatures as there is no star formation in the galaxy and its active galactic nucleus is 5-10 times less luminous than the one in NGC 5194, which exhibits only a modest enhancement in the amplitude of its ISRF.
  • Using new far-infrared imaging from the Herschel Space Observatory with ancillary data from ultraviolet to submillimeter wavelengths, we estimate the total emission from dust and stars of 62 nearby galaxies in the KINGFISH survey in a way that is as empirical and model-independent as possible. We collect and exploit these data in order to measure from the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) precisely how much stellar radiation is intercepted and re-radiated by dust, and how this quantity varies with galaxy properties. By including SPIRE data, we are more sensitive to emission from cold dust grains than previous analyses at shorter wavelengths, allowing for more accurate estimates of dust temperatures and masses. The dust/stellar flux ratio, which we measure by integrating the SEDs, has a range of nearly three decades. The inclusion of SPIRE data shows that estimates based on data not reaching these far-IR wavelengths are biased low. We find that the dust/stellar flux ratio varies with morphology and total IR luminosity. We also find that dust/stellar flux ratios are related to gas-phase metallicity, while the dust/stellar mass ratios are less so. The substantial scatter between dust/stellar flux and dust/stellar mass indicates that the former is a poor proxy of the latter. Comparing the dust/stellar flux ratios and dust temperatures, we show that early-types tend to have slightly warmer temperatures than spiral galaxies, which may be due to more intense interstellar radiation fields, or to different dust grain compositions. Finally, we show that early-types and early-type spirals have a strong correlation between the dust/stellar flux ratio and specific star formation rate, which suggests that the relatively bright far-IR emission of some of these galaxies is due to ongoing star formation and the radiation field from older stars.
  • We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE results of the Vela C molecular complex in the far-infrared and submillimetre regimes at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 um, spanning the peak of emission of cold prestellar or protostellar cores. Column density and multi-resolution analysis (MRA) differentiates the Vela C complex into five distinct sub-regions. Each sub-region displays differences in their column density and temperature probability distribution functions (PDFs), in particular, the PDFs of the `Centre-Ridge' and `South-Nest' sub-regions appear in stark contrast to each other. The Centre-Ridge displays a bimodal temperature PDF representative of hot gas surrounding the HII region RCW 36 and the cold neighbouring filaments, whilst the South-Nest is dominated by cold filamentary structure. The column density PDF of the Centre-Ridge is flatter than the South-Nest, with a high column density tail, consistent with formation through large-scale flows, and regulation by self-gravity. At small to intermediate scales MRA indicates the Centre-Ridge to be twice as concentrated as the South-Nest, whilst on larger scales, a greater portion of the gas in the South-Nest is dominated by turbulence than in the Centre-Ridge. In Vela C, high-mass stars appear to be preferentially forming in ridges, i.e., dominant high column density filaments.
  • We present Spitzer imaging of the metal-deficient (Z ~30% Z_sun) Local Group dwarf galaxy NGC 6822. On spatial scales of ~130 pc, we study the nature of IR, H alpha, HI, and radio continuum emission. Nebular emission strength correlates with IR surface brightness; however, roughly half of the IR emission is associated with diffuse regions not luminous at H alpha (as found in previous studies). The global ratio of dust to HI gas in the ISM, while uncertain at the factor of ~2 level, is ~25 times lower than the global values derived for spiral galaxies using similar modeling techniques; localized ratios of dust to HI gas are about a factor of five higher than the global value in NGC 6822. There are strong variations (factors of ~10) in the relative ratios of H alpha and IR flux throughout the central disk; the low dust content of NGC 6822 is likely responsible for the different H alpha/IR ratios compared to those found in more metal-rich environments. The H alpha and IR emission is associated with high-column density (> ~1E21 cm^-2) neutral gas. Increases in IR surface brightness appear to be affected by both increased radiation field strength and increased local gas density. Individual regions and the galaxy as a whole fall within the observed scatter of recent high-resolution studies of the radio-far IR correlation in nearby spiral galaxies; this is likely the result of depleted radio and far-IR emission strengths in the ISM of this dwarf galaxy.
  • We present Spitzer observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1705 obtained as part of SINGS. The galaxy morphology is very different shortward and longward of ~5 microns: short-wavelength imaging shows an underlying red stellar population, with the central super star cluster (SSC) dominating the luminosity; longer-wavelength data reveals warm dust emission arising from two off-nuclear regions offset by ~250 pc from the SSC. These regions show little extinction at optical wavelengths. The galaxy has a relatively low global dust mass (~2E5 solar masses, implying a global dust-to-gas mass ratio ~2--4 times lower than the Milky Way average). The off-nuclear dust emission appears to be powered by photons from the same stellar population responsible for the excitation of the observed H Alpha emission; these photons are unassociated with the SSC (though a contribution from embedded sources to the IR luminosity of the off-nuclear regions cannot be ruled out). Low-resolution IRS spectroscopy shows moderate-strength PAH emission in the 11.3 micron band in the eastern peak; no PAH emission is detected in the SSC or the western dust emission complex. There is significant diffuse 8 micron emission after scaling and subtracting shorter wavelength data; the spatially variable PAH emission strengths revealed by the IRS data suggest caution in the interpretation of diffuse 8 micron emission as arising from PAH carriers alone. The metallicity of NGC 1705 falls at the transition level of 35% solar found by Engelbracht and collaborators; the fact that a system at this metallicity shows spatially variable PAH emission demonstrates the complexity of interpreting diffuse 8 micron emission. A radio continuum non-detection, NGC 1705 deviates significantly from the canonical far-IR vs. radio correlation. (Abridged)
  • We present spatially resolved Spitzer imaging of the supergiant shell region of the M81 group dwarf galaxy IC 2574 obtained as part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. This region harbors one of the best nearby examples of a kinematically distinct HI shell, with an associated remnant stellar cluster; the shell is initiating sequential star formation as it interacts with the surrounding interstellar medium. This region dominates the infrared luminosity of IC 2574 and is spatially resolved in all Spitzer imaging bands. We study the differences in dust temperature as a function of local environment and compare local star formation rates as inferred from H Alpha and total infrared luminosities. We find that the strong H Alpha sources are associated with regions of warm dust; however, the most luminous infrared and H Alpha sources are not necessarilyco-spatial. The coolest dust is found in the regions farthest from the rim of the shell; these regions show the best agreement between star formation rates derived from H Alpha and from total infrared luminosities (although discrepancies at the factor of 3-4 level still exist). There is considerable variation in the radio-far infrared correlation in different regions surrounding the shell. The low dust content of the region may influence the scatter seen in these relations; these data demonstrate that the expanding shell is dramatically affecting its surroundings by triggering star formation and altering the dust temperature.