• We analyze the robustness of topological order in the toric code in an open boundary setting in the presence of perturbations. The boundary conditions are introduced on a cylinder, and are classified into condensing and non-condensing classes depending on the behavior of the excitations at the boundary under perturbation. For the non-condensing class, we see that the topological order is more robust when compared to the case of periodic boundary conditions while in the condensing case topological order is lost as soon as the perturbation is turned on. In most cases, the robustness can be understood by the quantum phase diagram of a equivalent Ising model.
  • We analyze theoretically the many-body dynamics of a dissipative Ising model in a transverse field using a variational approach. We find that the steady state phase diagram is substantially modified compared to its equilibrium counterpart, including the appearance of a multicritical point belonging to a different universality class. Building on our variational analysis, we establish a field-theoretical treatment corresponding to a dissipative variant of a Ginzburg-Landau theory, which allows us to compute the upper critical dimension of the system. Finally, we present a possible experimental realization of the dissipative Ising model using ultracold Rydberg gases.
  • We establish a generic method to analyze the time evolution of open quantum many-body systems. Our approach is based on a variational integration of the quantum master equation describing the dynamics and naturally connects to a variational principle for its nonequilibrium steady state. We successfully apply our variational method to study dissipative Rydberg gases, finding excellent quantitative agreement with small-scale simulations of the full quantum master equation. We observe that correlations related to non-Markovian behavior play a significant role during the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state. We further quantify this non-Markovianity and find it to be closely connected to an information-theoretical measure of quantum and classical correlations.
  • Understanding dissipation in 2D quantum many-body systems is a remarkably difficult open challenge. Here we show how numerical simulations for this problem are possible by means of a tensor network algorithm that approximates steady-states of 2D quantum lattice dissipative systems in the thermodynamic limit. Our method is based on the intuition that strong dissipation kills quantum entanglement before it gets too large to handle. We test its validity by simulating a dissipative quantum Ising model, relevant for dissipative systems of interacting Rydberg atoms, and benchmark our simulations with a variational algorithm based on product and correlated states. Our results support the existence of a first order transition in this model, with no bistable region. We also simulate a dissipative spin-1/2 XYZ model, showing that there is no re-entrance of the ferromagnetic phase. Our method enables the computation of steady states in 2D quantum lattice systems.
  • These lecture notes were created for a graduate-level course on quantum simulation taught at Leibniz University Hannover in 2013. The first part of the course discusses various state of the art methods for the numerical description of many-body quantum systems. In particular, I explain successful applications and inherent limitations due to the exponential complexity of the many-body problem. In the second part of the course, I show how using highly controllable quantum system such as ultracold atoms will provide a way to overcome the limitations of classical simulation methods. I discuss several theoretical and experimental achievements and outline the road for future developments.
  • The sensing of external fields using quantum systems is a prime example of an emergent quantum technology. Generically, the sensitivity of a quantum sensor consisting of $N$ independent particles is proportional to $\sqrt{N}$. However, interactions invariably occuring at high densities lead to a breakdown of the assumption of independence between the particles, posing a severe challenge for quantum sensors operating at the nanoscale. Here, we show that interactions in quantum sensors can be transformed from a nuisance into an advantage when strong interactions trigger a dissipative phase transition in an open quantum system. We demonstrate this behavior by analyzing dissipative quantum sensors based upon nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamond. Using both a variational method and numerical simulation of the master equation describing the open quantum many-body system, we establish the existence of a dissipative first order transition that can be used for quantum sensing. We investigate the properties of this phase transition for two- and three-dimensional setups, demonstrating that the transition can be observed using current experimental technology. Finally, we show that quantum sensors based on dissipative phase transitions are particularly robust against imperfections such as disorder or decoherence, with the sensitivity of the sensor not being limited by the $T_2$ coherence time of the device. Our results can readily be applied to other applications in quantum sensing and quantum metrology where interactions are currently a limiting factor.
  • We investigate a one-dimensional atomic lattice laser-driven to a Rydberg state, in which engineered dissipation channels lead to entanglement in the many-body system. In particular, we demonstrate the efficient generation of ground states of a frustration-free Hamiltonian, as well as $W$ states. We discuss the realization of the required coherent and dissipative terms, and we perform extensive numerical simulations characterizing the fidelity of the state preparation procedure. We identify the optimum parameters for high fidelity entanglement preparation and investigate the scaling with the size of the system.
  • Light-matter interfaces enable the generation of entangled states of light and matter which can be exploited to steer the quantum state of matter through measurement of light and feedback. Here we consider continuous-time, interferometric homodyne measurements of light on an array of light-matter interfaces followed by local feedback acting on each material system individually. While the systems are physically non-interacting, the feedback master equation we derive describes driven-dissipative, interacting many-body quantum dynamics, and comprises pairwise Hamiltonian interactions and collective jump operators. We characterize the general class of driven-dissipative many body systems which can be engineered in this way, and derive necessary conditions on models supporting non-trivial quantum dynamics beyond what can be generated by local operations and classical communication. We provide specific examples of models which allow for the creation of stationary many-particle entanglement, and the emulation of dissipative Ising models. Since the interaction between the systems is mediated via feedback only, there is no intrinsic limit on the range or geometry of the interaction, making the scheme quite versatile.
  • The Fermi-Hubbard model is one of the key models of condensed matter physics, which holds a potential for explaining the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent progress in ultracold atoms in optical lattices has paved the way to studying the model's phase diagram using the tools of quantum simulation, which emerged as a promising alternative to the numerical calculations plagued by the infamous sign problem. However, the temperatures achieved using elaborate laser cooling protocols so far have been too high to show the appearance of antiferromagnetic and superconducting quantum phases directly. In this work, we demonstrate that using the machinery of dissipative quantum state engineering, one can efficiently prepare antiferromagnetic order in present-day experiments with ultracold fermions. The core of the approach is to add incoherent laser scattering in such a way that the antiferromagnetic state emerges as the dark state of the driven-dissipative dynamics. In order to elucidate the development of the antiferromagnetic order we employ two complementary techniques: Monte Carlo wave function simulations for small systems and a recently proposed variational method for open quantum systems, operating in the thermodynamic limit. The controlled dissipation channels described in this work are straightforward to add to already existing experimental setups.
  • I propose an archtitecture for the realization of dissipative quantum many-body spin models. The dissipative processes are mediated by interactions with auxiliary particles and lead to a widely tunable class of correlated quantum jump operators. These findings enable the investigation of purely dissipative spin models, where coherent dynamics is entirely absent. I provide a detailed review of a recently introduced variational method to analyze such dissipative quantum many-body systems, and I discuss a specific example in terms of a purely dissipative Heisenberg model, for which I find an additional disordered phase that is not present in the corresponding ground state phase diagram.
  • The formation of molecules and supramolecular structures results from bonding by conservative forces acting among electrons and nuclei and giving rise to equilibrium configurations defined by minima of the interaction potential. Here we show that bonding can also occur by the non-conservative forces responsible for interaction-induced coherent population trapping. The bound state arises in a dissipative process and manifests itself as a stationary state at a preordained interatomic distance. Remarkably, such a dissipative bonding is present even when the interactions among the atoms are purely repulsive. The dissipative bound states can be created and studied spectroscopically in present-day experiments with ultracold atoms or molecules and can potentially serve for cooling strongly interacting quantum gases.
  • We study the non-equilibrium steady state arising from the interplay between coherent and dissipative dynamics in strongly interacting Rydberg gases using a recently introduced variational method [H. Weimer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 040402 (2015)]. We give a detailed discussion of the properties of this novel approach, and we provide a comparison with methods related to the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. We find that the variational approach offers some intrinsic advantages, and we also show that it is able to explain the experimental results obtained in an ultracold Rydberg gas on an unprecedented quantitative level.
  • We present a novel generic framework to approximate the non-equilibrium steady states of dissipative quantum many-body systems. It is based on the variational minimization of a suitable norm of the quantum master equation describing the dynamics. We show how to apply this approach to different classes of variational quantum states and demonstrate its successful application to a dissipative extension of the Ising model, which is of importance to ongoing experiments on ultracold Rydberg atoms. Finally, we identify several advantages of the variational approach over previously employed mean-field-like methods.
  • We study the quantum melting of quasi-one-dimensional lattice models in which the dominant energy scale is given by a repulsive dipolar interaction. By constructing an effective low-energy theory, we show that the melting of crystalline phases can occur into two distinct liquid phases, having the same algebraic decay of density-density correlations, but showing a different non-local correlation function expressing string order. We present possible experimental realizations using ultracold atoms and molecules, introducing an implementation based on resonantly driven Rydberg atoms that offers additional benefits compared to a weak admixture of the Rydberg state.
  • We present an architecture for the quantum simulation of many-body spin interactions based on ultracold polar molecules trapped in optical lattices. Our approach employs digital quantum simulation, i.e., the dynamics of the simulated system is reproduced by the quantum simulator in a stroboscopic pattern, and allows to simulate both coherent and dissipative dynamics. We discuss the realization of Kitaev's toric code Hamiltonian, a paradigmatic model involving four-body interactions, and we analyze the requirements for an experimental implementation.
  • In this comment we argue that negative absolute temperatures are a well-established concept for systems with bounded spectra. They are not only consistent with thermodynamics, but are even unavoidable for a consistent description of the thermal equilibrium of inverted populations.
  • Magnetic impurities embedded in inert solids can exhibit long coherence times and interact with one another via their intrinsic anisotropic dipolar interaction. We argue that, as a consequence of these properties, disordered ensembles of magnetic impurities provide an effective platform for realizing a controllable, tunable version of the dipolar quantum spin glass seen in LiHo$_x$Y$_{1-x}$F$_4$. Specifically, we propose and analyze a system composed of dysprosium atoms embedded in solid helium. We describe the phase diagram of the system and discuss the realizability and detectability of the quantum spin glass and antiglass phases.
  • We propose and analyze a technique to collectively enhance interactions between solid-state quantum registers composed from random networks of spin qubits. In such systems, disordered dipolar interactions generically result in localization. Here, we demonstrate the emergence of a single collective delocalized eigenmode as one turns on a transverse magnetic field. The interaction strength between this symmetric collective mode and a remote spin qubit is enhanced by square root of the number of spins participating in the delocalized mode. Mediated by such collective enhancement, long-range quantum logic between remote spin registers can occur at distances consistent with optical addressing. A specific implementation utilizing Nitrogen-Vacancy defects in diamond is discussed and the effects of decoherence are considered.
  • We study the growth dynamics of ordered structures of strongly interacting polar molecules in optical lattices. Using dipole blockade of microwave excitations, we map the system onto an interacting spin-1/2 model possessing ground states with crystalline order, and describe a way to prepare these states by non-adiabatically driving the transitions between molecular rotational levels. The proposed technique bypasses the need to cross a phase transition and allows for the creation of ordered domains of considerably larger size compared to approaches relying on adiabatic preparation.
  • We propose the use of dipolar spin chains to enable long-range quantum logic between distant qubits. In our approach, an effective interaction between remote qubits is achieved by adiabatically following the ground state of the dipolar chain across the paramagnet to crystal phase transition. We demonstrate that the proposed quantum gate is particularly robust against disorder and derive scaling relations, showing that high-fidelity qubit coupling is possible in the presence of realistic imperfections. Possible experimental implementations in systems ranging from ultracold Rydberg atoms to arrays of Nitrogen-Vacancy defect centers in diamond are discussed.
  • We propose an experimental setup to efficiently measure the dynamic structure factor of ultracold quantum gases. Our method uses the interaction of the trapped atomic system with two different cavity modes, which are driven by external laser fields. By measuring the output fields of the cavity the dynamic structure factor of the atomic system can be determined. Contrary to previous approaches the atomic system is not destroyed during the measurement process.
  • Following Feynman and as elaborated on by Lloyd, a universal quantum simulator (QS) is a controlled quantum device which reproduces the dynamics of any other many particle quantum system with short range interactions. This dynamics can refer to both coherent Hamiltonian and dissipative open system evolution. We investigate how laser excited Rydberg atoms in large spacing optical or magnetic lattices can provide an efficient implementation of a universal QS for spin models involving (high order) n-body interactions. This includes the simulation of Hamiltonians of exotic spin models involving n-particle constraints such as the Kitaev toric code, color code, and lattice gauge theories with spin liquid phases. In addition, it provides the ingredients for dissipative preparation of entangled states based on engineering n-particle reservoir couplings. The key basic building blocks of our architecture are efficient and high-fidelity n-qubit entangling gates via auxiliary Rydberg atoms, including a possible dissipative time step via optical pumping. This allows to mimic the time evolution of the system by a sequence of fast, parallel and high-fidelity n-particle coherent and dissipative Rydberg gates.
  • We review experimental and theoretical tools to excite, study and understand strongly interacting Rydberg gases. The focus lies on the excitation of dense ultracold atomic samples close to, or within quantum degeneracy, to high lying Rydberg states. The major part is dedicated to highly excited S-states of Rubidium, which feature an isotropic van-der-Waals potential. Nevertheless, the setup and the methods presented are also applicable to other atomic species used in the field of laser cooling and atom trapping.
  • Topology plays a central role in ensuring the robustness of a wide variety of physical phenomena. Notable examples range from the robust current carrying edge states associated with the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects to proposals involving topologically protected quantum memory and quantum logic operations. Here, we propose and analyze a topologically protected channel for the transfer of quantum states between remote quantum nodes. In our approach, state transfer is mediated by the edge mode of a chiral spin liquid. We demonstrate that the proposed method is intrinsically robust to realistic imperfections associated with disorder and decoherence. Possible experimental implementations and applications to the detection and characterization of spin liquid phases are discussed.
  • We study the interplay of photons interacting with an artificial atom in the presence of a controlled dephasing. Such artifical atoms consisting of several independent scatterer can exhibit remarkable properties superior to single atoms with a prominent example being a superatom based on Rydberg blockade. We demonstrate that the induced dephasing allows for the controlled absorption of a single photon from an arbitrary incoming probe field. This unique tool in photon-matter interaction opens a way for building novel quantum devices and several potential applications like a single photon transistor, high fidelity n-photon counters, or for the creation of non-classical states of light by photon subtraction are presented.