• In fiber-optic communications, evaluation of mutual information (MI) is still an open issue due to the unavailability of an exact and mathematically tractable channel model. Traditionally, lower bounds on MI are computed by approximating the (original) channel with an auxiliary forward channel. In this paper, lower bounds are computed using an auxiliary backward channel, which has not been previously considered in the context of fiber-optic communications. Distributions obtained through two variations of the stochastic digital backpropagation (SDBP) algorithm are used as auxiliary backward channels and these bounds are compared with bounds obtained through the conventional digital backpropagation (DBP). Through simulations, higher information rates were achieved with SDBP, {which can be explained by the ability of SDBP to account for nonlinear signal--noise interactions
  • Pilot contamination, defined as the interference during the channel estimation process due to reusing the same pilot sequences in neighboring cells, can severely degrade the performance of massive multiple-input multiple-output systems. In this paper, we propose a location-based approach to mitigating the pilot contamination problem for uplink multiple-input multiple-output systems. Our approach makes use of the approximate locations of mobile devices to provide good estimates of the channel statistics between the mobile devices and their corresponding base stations. Specifically, we aim at avoiding pilot contamination even when the number of base station antennas is not very large, and when multiple users from different cells, or even in the same cell, are assigned the same pilot sequence. First, we characterize a desired angular region of the target user at the serving base station based on the number of base station antennas and the location of the target user, and make the observation that in this region the interference is close to zero due to the spatial separability. Second, based on this observation, we propose pilot coordination methods for multi-user multi-cell scenarios to avoid pilot contamination. The numerical results indicate that the proposed pilot contamination avoidance schemes enhance the quality of the channel estimation and thereby improve the per-cell sum rate offered by target base stations.
  • Recently, mmWave 5G localization has been shown to be a promising technology to achieve centimetre-level accuracy. This generates more opportunities for location-aware communication applications. One assumption usually made in the investigation of localization methods is that the user equipment (UE) and the base station (BS) are synchronized. However, in reality, communications systems are not finely synchronized to a level useful for localization. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate two-way localization protocols that avoid the prerequisite of tight time synchronization. Namely, we consider a distributed localization protocol (DLP), whereby the BS and UE exchange signals in two rounds of transmission and then localization is achieved using the signal received in the second round. On the other hand, we also consider a centralized localization protocol (CLP), whereby localization is achieved using the signals received in the two rounds. We derive the position (PEB) and orientation error bounds (OEB) applying beamforming at both ends and compare them to the traditional one-way localization. Our results obtained using realistic system parameters show that mmWave localization is mainly limited by angular rather than temporal estimation and that CLP significantly outperforms DLP. Our simulations also show that it is more beneficial to have more antennas at the BS than at the UE.
  • Machine learning is used to compute achievable information rates (AIRs) for a simplified fiber channel. The approach jointly optimizes the input distribution (constellation shaping) and the auxiliary channel distribution to compute AIRs without explicit channel knowledge in an end-to-end fashion.
  • Millimeter wave signals with multiple transmit and receive antennas are considered as enabling technology for enhanced mobile broadband services in 5G systems. While this combination is mainly associated with achieving high data rates, it also offers huge potential for radio-based positioning. Recent studies showed that millimeter wave systems with multiple transmit and receive antennas are capable of jointly estimating the position and orientation of a mobile terminal while mapping the radio environment simultaneously. To this end, we present a message passing-based estimator which jointly estimates the position and orientation of the mobile terminal, as well as the location of reflectors or scatterers. We provide numerical examples showing that this estimator can provide considerably higher estimation accuracy compared to a state-of-the-art estimator. Our examples demonstrate that our message passing-based estimator neither requires the presence of a line-of-sight path nor prior knowledge regarding any of the parameters to be estimated.
  • The problem of phase-noise compensation for correlated phase noise in coded multichannel optical transmission is investigated. To that end, a multichannel phase-noise model is introduced and the maximum a posteriori detector for this model is approximated using two frameworks, namely factor graphs (FGs) and the sum--product algorithm (SPA), as well as a variational Bayesian (VB) inference. The resulting pilot-aided algorithms perform phase-noise compensation in cooperation with an iterative decoder, using extended Kalman smoothing to estimate the a posteriori phase-noise distribution jointly for all channels. Through Monte Carlo simulations, the algorithms are assessed in terms of phase-noise tolerance for coded transmission. It is observed that they significantly outperform the conventional approach of performing phase-noise compensation separately for each channel. Moreover, the results reveal that the FG/SPA framework performs similarly or better than the VB framework in terms of phase-noise tolerance of the resulting algorithms.
  • In millimeter-wave channels, most of the received energy is carried by a few paths. Traditional precoders sweep the angle-of-departure (AoD) and angle-of-arrival (AoA) space with directional precoders to identify directions with largest power. Such precoders are heuristic and lead to sub-optimal AoD/AoA estimation. We derive optimal precoders, minimizing the Cram\'{e}r-Rao bound (CRB) of the AoD/AoA, assuming a fully digital architecture at the transmitter and spatial filtering of a single path. The precoders are found by solving a suitable convex optimization problem. We demonstrate that the accuracy can be improved by at least a factor of two over traditional precoders, and show that there is an optimal number of distinct precoders beyond which the CRB does not improve.
  • Location-aware communication systems are expected to play a pivotal part in the next generation of mobile communication networks. Therefore, there is a need to understand the localization limits in these networks, particularly, using millimeter-wave technology (mmWave). Towards that, we address the uplink and downlink localization limits in terms of 3D position and orientation error bounds for mmWave multipath channels. We also carry out a detailed analysis of the dependence of the bounds of different systems parameters. Our key findings indicate that the uplink and downlink behave differently in two distinct ways. First of all, the error bounds have different scaling factors with respect to the number of antennas in the uplink and downlink. Secondly, uplink localization is sensitive to the orientation angle of the user equipment (UE), whereas downlink is not. Moreover, in the considered outdoor scenarios, the non-line-of-sight paths generally improve localization when a line-of-sight path exists. Finally, our numerical results show that mmWave systems are capable of localizing a UE with sub-meter position error, and sub-degree orientation error.
  • Belief propagation (BP) is a powerful tool to solve distributed inference problems, though it is limited by short cycles in the corresponding factor graph. Such cycles may lead to incorrect solutions or oscillatory behavior. Only for certain types of problems are convergence properties understood. We extend this knowledge by investigating the use of reweighted BP for distributed likelihood fusion problems, which are characterized by equality constraints along possibly short cycles. Through a linear formulation of BP, we are able to analytically derive convergence conditions for certain types of graphs and optimize the convergence speed. We compare with standard belief consensus and observe significantly faster convergence.
  • Millimeter wave signals and large antenna arrays are considered enabling technologies for future 5G networks. While their benefits for achieving high-data rate communications are well-known, their potential advantages for accurate positioning are largely undiscovered. We derive the Cram\'{e}r-Rao bound (CRB) on position and rotation angle estimation uncertainty from millimeter wave signals from a single transmitter, in the presence of scatterers. We also present a novel two-stage algorithm for position and rotation angle estimation that attains the CRB for average to high signal-to-noise ratio. The algorithm is based on multiple measurement vectors matching pursuit for coarse estimation, followed by a refinement stage based on the space-alternating generalized expectation maximization algorithm. We find that accurate position and rotation angle estimation is possible using signals from a single transmitter, in either line-of- sight, non-line-of-sight, or obstructed-line-of-sight conditions.
  • In this paper, a novel technique for tight outer-approximation of the intersection region of a finite number of ellipses in 2-dimensional (2D) space is proposed. First, the vertices of a tight polygon that contains the convex intersection of the ellipses are found in an efficient manner. To do so, the intersection points of the ellipses that fall on the boundary of the intersection region are determined, and a set of points is generated on the elliptic arcs connecting every two neighbouring intersection points. By finding the tangent lines to the ellipses at the extended set of points, a set of half-planes is obtained, whose intersection forms a polygon. To find the polygon more efficiently, the points are given an order and the intersection of the half-planes corresponding to every two neighbouring points is calculated. If the polygon is convex and bounded, these calculated points together with the initially obtained intersection points will form its vertices. If the polygon is non-convex or unbounded, we can detect this situation and then generate additional discrete points only on the elliptical arc segment causing the issue, and restart the algorithm to obtain a bounded and convex polygon. Finally, the smallest area ellipse that contains the vertices of the polygon is obtained by solving a convex optimization problem. Through numerical experiments, it is illustrated that the proposed technique returns a tighter outer-approximation of the intersection of multiple ellipses, compared to conventional techniques, with only slightly higher computational cost.
  • In millimeter wave communications, hybrid analog-digital arrays consisting of only a few radiofrequency (RF) chains offer an attractive alternative to costly digital arrays. A limitation to hybrid arrays is that the number of streams that can be transmitted simultaneously cannot exceed the number of RF chains. We demonstrate that if the states of the analog components and the symbols passed to the RF chains are jointly optimized on a symbol-by-symbol (SbS) basis, it is possible to achieve the same degrees of freedom as a digital array with linear precoding, thus effectively enabling the transmission of a large number of streams. To this end, an algorithm for SbS hybrid precoding is proposed based on a variation of orthogonal matching pursuit, particularly suited to the structure of our problem, which makes it fast and precise.
  • Absolute positioning of vehicles is based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) combined with on-board sensors and high-resolution maps. In Cooperative Intelligent Transportation Systems (C-ITS), the positioning performance can be augmented by means of vehicular networks that enable vehicles to share location-related information. This paper presents an Implicit Cooperative Positioning (ICP) algorithm that exploits the Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) connectivity in an innovative manner, avoiding the use of explicit V2V measurements such as ranging. In the ICP approach, vehicles jointly localize non-cooperative physical features (such as people, traffic lights or inactive cars) in the surrounding areas, and use them as common noisy reference points to refine their location estimates. Information on sensed features are fused through V2V links by a consensus procedure, nested within a message passing algorithm, to enhance the vehicle localization accuracy. As positioning does not rely on explicit ranging information between vehicles, the proposed ICP method is amenable to implementation with off-the-shelf vehicular communication hardware. The localization algorithm is validated in different traffic scenarios, including a crossroad area with heterogeneous conditions in terms of feature density and V2V connectivity, as well as a real urban area by using Simulation of Urban MObility (SUMO) for traffic data generation. Performance results show that the proposed ICP method can significantly improve the vehicle location accuracy compared to the stand-alone GNSS, especially in harsh environments, such as in urban canyons, where the GNSS signal is highly degraded or denied.
  • Location-aided beam alignment has been proposed recently as a potential approach for fast link establishment in millimeter wave (mmWave) massive MIMO (mMIMO) communications. However, due to mobility and other imperfections in the estimation process, the spatial information obtained at the base station (BS) and the user (UE) is likely to be noisy, degrading beam alignment performance. In this paper, we introduce a robust beam alignment framework in order to exhibit resilience with respect to this problem. We first recast beam alignment as a decentralized coordination problem where BS and UE seek coordination on the basis of correlated yet individual position information. We formulate the optimum beam alignment solution as the solution of a Bayesian team decision problem. We then propose a suite of algorithms to approach optimality with reduced complexity. The effectiveness of the robust beam alignment procedure, compared with classical designs, is then verified on simulation settings with varying location information accuracies.
  • Intersections are critical areas of the transportation infrastructure associated with 47% of all road accidents. Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication has the potential of preventing up to 35% of such serious road collisions. In fact, under the 5G/LTE Rel.15+ standardization, V2V is a critical use-case not only for the purpose of enhancing road safety, but also for enabling traffic efficiency in modern smart cities. Under this anticipated 5G definition, high reliability of 0.99999 is expected for semi-autonomous vehicles (i.e., driver-in-the-loop). As a consequence, there is a need to assess the reliability, especially for accident-prone areas, such as intersections. We unpack traditional average V2V reliability in order to quantify its related fine-grained V2V reliability. Contrary to existing work on infinitely large roads, when we consider finite road segments of significance to practical real-world deployment, fine-grained reliability exhibits bimodal behavior. Performance for a certain vehicular traffic scenario is either very reliable or extremely unreliable, but nowhere in relative proximity to the average performance.
  • Safe transportation is a key use-case of the 5G/LTE Rel.15+ communications, where an end-to-end reliability of 0.99999 is expected for a vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) transmission distance of 100-200 m. Since communications reliability is related to road-safety, it is crucial to verify the fulfillment of the performance, especially for accident-prone areas such as intersections. We derive closed-form expressions for the V2V transmission reliability near suburban corners and urban intersections over finite interference regions. The analysis is based on plausible street configurations, traffic scenarios, and empirically-supported channel propagation. We show the means by which the performance metric can serve as a preliminary design tool to meet a target reliability. We then apply meta distribution concepts to provide a careful dissection of V2V communications reliability. Contrary to existing work on infinite roads, when we consider finite road segments for practical deployment, fine-grained reliability per realization exhibits bimodal behavior. Either performance for a certain vehicular traffic scenario is very reliable or extremely unreliable, but nowhere in relatively proximity to the average performance. In other words, standard SINR-based average performance metrics are analytically accurate but can be insufficient from a practical viewpoint. Investigating other safety-critical point process networks at the meta distribution-level may reveal similar discrepancies.
  • Emerging wireless communication systems will be characterized by a tight coupling between communication and positioning. This is particularly apparent in millimeter-wave (mm-wave) communications, where devices use a large number of antennas and the propagation is well described by geometric channel models. For mm-wave communications, initial access, consisting in the beam selection and alignment of two devices, is challenging and time-consuming in the absence of location information. Conversely, accurate positioning relies on high-quality communication links with proper beam alignment. This paper studies this interaction and proposes a new position-aided beam selection protocol, which considers the problem of joint communication and positioning in scenarios with direct line-of-sight and scattering. Simulation results show significant reductions in latency with respect to a standard protocol.
  • In this paper, we consider a set of agents, which may receive an observation of their state by a central observa- tion post via a shared wireless network. The aim of this work is to design a scheduling mechanism for the central observation post to decide how to allocate the available communication resources. The problem is tackled in two phases: (i) first, the local controllers are designed so as to stabilise the subsystems for the case of perfect communication; (ii) second, the com- munication schedule is decided with the aim of maximising the stability of the subsystems. To this end, we formulate an optimisation problem which explicitly minimises the Lyapunov function increase due to communication limitations. We show how the proposed optimisation can be expressed in terms of Value of Information (VoI), we prove Lyapunov stability in probability and we test our approach in simulations.
  • Cooperative localization in agent networks based on interagent time-of-flight measurements is closely related to synchronization. To leverage this relation, we propose a Bayesian factor graph framework for cooperative simultaneous localization and synchronization (CoSLAS). This framework is suited to mobile agents and time-varying local clock parameters. Building on the CoSLAS factor graph, we develop a distributed (decentralized) belief propagation algorithm for CoSLAS in the practically important case of an affine clock model and asymmetric time stamping. Our algorithm allows for real-time operation and is suitable for a time-varying network connectivity. To achieve high accuracy at reduced complexity and communication cost, the algorithm combines particle implementations with parametric message representations and takes advantage of a conditional independence property. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithm in a challenging scenario with time-varying network connectivity.
  • Vehicular networks allow vehicles to share information and are expected to be an integral part in future intelligent transportation system (ITS). In order to guide and validate the design process, analytical expressions of key performance metrics such as packet reception probabilities and throughput are necessary, in particular for accident-prone scenarios such as intersections. In this paper, we analyze the impact of interference in an intersection scenario with two perpendicular roads using tools from stochastic geometry. We present a general procedure to analytically determine the packet reception probability and throughput of a selected link, taking into account the geographical clustering of vehicles close to the intersection. We consider both Aloha and CSMA MAC protocols, and show how the procedure can be used to model different propagation environments of practical relevance. We show how different path loss functions and fading distributions can be incorporated in the analysis to model propagation conditions typical to both rural and urban intersections. Our results indicate that the procedure is general and flexible to deal with a variety of scenarios. Thus, it can serve as a useful design tool for communication system engineers, complementing simulations and experiments, to obtain quick insights into the network performance.
  • Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication can improve road safety and traffic efficiency, particularly around critical areas such as intersections. We analytically derive V2V success probability near an urban intersection, based on empirically supported line-of-sight (LOS), weak-line-of-sight (WLOS), and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) channel models. The analysis can serve as a preliminary design tool for performance assessment over different system parameters and target performance requirements.
  • Large-scale MIMO systems are well known for their advantages in communications, but they also have the potential for providing very accurate localization thanks to their high angular resolution. A difficult problem arising indoors and outdoors is localizing users over multipath channels. Localization based on angle of arrival (AOA) generally involves a two-step procedure, where signals are first processed to obtain a user's AOA at different base stations, followed by triangulation to determine the user's position. In the presence of multipath, the performance of these methods is greatly degraded due to the inability to correctly detect and/or estimate the AOA of the line-of-sight (LOS) paths. To counter the limitations of this two-step procedure which is inherently sub-optimal, we propose a direct localization approach in which the position of a user is localized by jointly processing the observations obtained at distributed massive MIMO base stations. Our approach is based on a novel compressed sensing framework that exploits channel properties to distinguish LOS from non-LOS signal paths, and leads to improved performance results compared to previous existing methods.
  • We propose a Bayesian method for distributed sequential localization of mobile networks composed of both cooperative agents and noncooperative objects. Our method provides a consistent combination of cooperative self-localization (CS) and distributed tracking (DT). Multiple mobile agents and objects are localized and tracked using measurements between agents and objects and between agents. For a distributed operation and low complexity, we combine particle-based belief propagation with a consensus or gossip scheme. High localization accuracy is achieved through a probabilistic information transfer between the CS and DT parts of the underlying factor graph. Simulation results demonstrate significant improvements in both agent self-localization and object localization performance compared to separate CS and DT, and very good scaling properties with respect to the numbers of agents and objects.
  • Spatial wireless channel prediction is important for future wireless networks, and in particular for proactive resource allocation at different layers of the protocol stack. Various sources of uncertainty must be accounted for during modeling and to provide robust predictions. We investigate two channel prediction frameworks, classical Gaussian processes (cGP) and uncertain Gaussian processes (uGP), and analyze the impact of location uncertainty during learning/training and prediction/testing, for scenarios where measurements uncertainty are dominated by large-scale fading. We observe that cGP generally fails both in terms of learning the channel parameters and in predicting the channel in the presence of location uncertainties.\textcolor{blue}{{} }In contrast, uGP explicitly considers the location uncertainty. Using simulated data, we show that uGP is able to learn and predict the wireless channel.
  • We introduce a distributed, cooperative framework and method for Bayesian estimation and control in decentralized agent networks. Our framework combines joint estimation of time-varying global and local states with information-seeking control optimizing the behavior of the agents. It is suited to nonlinear and non-Gaussian problems and, in particular, to location-aware networks. For cooperative estimation, a combination of belief propagation message passing and consensus is used. For cooperative control, the negative posterior joint entropy of all states is maximized via a gradient ascent. The estimation layer provides the control layer with probabilistic information in the form of sample representations of probability distributions. Simulation results demonstrate intelligent behavior of the agents and excellent estimation performance for a simultaneous self-localization and target tracking problem. In a cooperative localization scenario with only one anchor, mobile agents can localize themselves after a short time with an accuracy that is higher than the accuracy of the performed distance measurements.