• Transitional disks around the Herbig Ae/Be stars are fascinating targets in the contexts of disk evolution and also planet formation. Oph IRS 48 is one of such Herbig Ae stars, which shows an inner dust cavity and azimuthally lopsided large dust distribution. We present new images of Oph IRS 48 at eight mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths from 8.59 to 24.6\,$\mu {\rm m}$ taken with the COMICS mounted on the 8.2\,m Subaru Telescope. The N-band (7 to 13\,$\mu {\rm m}$) images show that the flux distribution is centrally peaked with a slight spatial extent, while the Q-band (17 to 25\,$\mu {\rm m}$) images show asymmetric double peaks (east and west). Using 18.8 and 24.6\,$\mu$m images, we derived the dust temperature at both east and west peaks to be 135$\pm$22 K. Thus, the asymmetry may not be attributed to a difference in the temperature. % thus other reason is necessary to explain the asymmetry of east and west peaks in Q-band. Comparing our results with previous modeling works, we conclude that the inner disk is aligned to the outer disk. A shadow casted by the optically thick inner disk has a great influence on the morphology of MIR thermal emission from the outer disk.
  • Aims. To investigate the mid-infrared (MIR) characteristics of Saturn's rings. Methods. We collected and analyzed MIR high spatial resolution images of Saturn's rings obtained in January 2008 and April 2005 with COMICS mounted on Subaru Telescope, and investigated the spatial variation in the surface brightness of the rings in multiple bands in the MIR. We also composed the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the C, B, and A rings and the Cassini Division, and estimated the temperatures of the rings from the SEDs assuming the optical depths. Results. We find that the C ring and the Cassini Division were warmer than the B and A rings in 2008, which could be accounted for by their lower albedos, lower optical depths, and smaller self-shadowing effect. We also find that the C ring and the Cassini Division were considerably brighter than the B and A rings in the MIR in 2008 and the radial contrast of the ring brightness is the inverse of that in 2005, which is interpreted as a result of a seasonal effect with changing elevations of the sun and observer above the ring plane.
  • Context: Debris disks are important observational clues for understanding planetary-system formation process. In particular, faint warm debris disks may be related to late planet formation near 1 AU. A systematic search of faint warm debris disks is necessary to reveal terrestrial planet formation. Aims: Faint warm debris disks show excess emission that peaks at mid-IR wavelengths. Thus we explore debris disks using the AKARI mid-IR all-sky point source catalog (PSC), a product of the second generation unbiased IR all-sky survey. Methods : We investigate IR excess emission for 678 isolated main-sequence stars for which there are 18 micron detections in the AKARI mid-IR all-sky catalog by comparing their fluxes with the predicted fluxes of the photospheres based on optical to near-IR fluxes and model spectra. The near-IR fluxes are first taken from the 2MASS PSC. However, 286 stars with Ks<4.5 in our sample have large flux errors in the 2MASS photometry due to saturation. Thus we have measured accurate J, H, and Ks band fluxes, applying neutral density (ND) filters for Simultaneous InfraRed Imager for Unbiased Survey (SIRIUS) on IRSF, the \phi 1.4 m near-IR telescope in South Africa, and improved the flux accuracy from 14% to 1.8% on average. Results: We identified 53 debris-disk candidates including eight new detections from our sample of 678 main-sequence stars. The detection rate of debris disks for this work is ~8%, which is comparable with those in previous works by Spitzer and Herschel. Conclusion: The importance of this study is the detection of faint warm debris disks around nearby field stars. At least nine objects have a large amount of dust for their ages, which cannot be explained by the conventional steady-state collisional cascade model.
  • We investigate the dust and gas distribution in the disk around HD 142527 based on ALMA observations of dust continuum, 13CO(3-2), and C18O(3-2) emission. The disk shows strong azimuthal asymmetry in the dust continuum emission, while gas emission is more symmetric. In this paper, we investigate how gas and dust are distributed in the dust-bright northern part of the disk and in the dust-faint southern part. We construct two axisymmetric disk models. One reproduces the radial profiles of the continuum and the velocity moments 0 and 1 of CO lines in the north and the other reproduces those in the south. We have found that the dust is concentrated in a narrow ring having ~50AU width (in FWHM; w_d=30AU in our parameter definition) located at ~170-200AU from the central star. The dust particles are strongly concentrated in the north. We have found that the dust surface density contrast between the north and south amounts to ~70. Compared to the dust, the gas distribution is more extended in the radial direction. We find that the gas component extends at least from ~100AU to ~250AU from the central star, and there should also be tenuous gas remaining inside and outside of these radii. The azimuthal asymmetry of gas distribution is much smaller than dust. The gas surface density differs only by a factor of ~3-10 between the north and south. Hence, gas-to-dust ratio strongly depends on the location of the disk: ~30 at the location of the peak of dust distribution in the south and ~3 at the location of the peak of dust distribution in the north. Despite large uncertainties, the overall gas-to-dust ratio is inferred to be ~10-30, indicating that the gas depletion may have already been under way.
  • We report short-time variations in the plasma tail of C/2013 R1(Lovejoy). A series of short (two to three minutes) exposure images with the 8.2-m Subaru telescope shows faint details of filaments and their motions over 24 minutes observing duration. We identified rapid movements of two knots in the plasma tail near the nucleus (~ 3 x 10^5 km). Their speeds are 20 and 25 km/s along the tail and 3.8 and 2.2 km/s across it, respectively. These measurements set a constraint on an acceleration model of plasma tail and knots as they set the initial speed just after their formation. We also found a rapid narrowing of the tail. After correcting the motion along the tail, the narrowing speed is estimated to be ~ 8 km/s. These rapid motions suggest the need for high time-resolution studies of comet plasma tails with a large telescope.
  • We report ALMA observations of dust continuum, 13CO J=3--2, and C18O J=3--2 line emission toward a gapped protoplanetary disk around HD 142527. The outer horseshoe-shaped disk shows the strong azimuthal asymmetry in dust continuum with the contrast of about 30 at 336 GHz between the northern peak and the southwestern minimum. In addition, the maximum brightness temperature of 24 K at its northern area is exceptionally high at 160 AU from a star. To evaluate the surface density in this region, the grain temperature needs to be constrained and was estimated from the optically thick 13CO J=3--2 emission. The lower limit of the peak surface density was then calculated to be 28 g cm-2 by assuming a canonical gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100. This finding implies that the region is locally too massive to withstand self-gravity since Toomre's Q <~1--2, and thus, it may collapse into a gaseous protoplanet. Another possibility is that the gas mass is low enough to be gravitationally stable and only dust grains are accumulated. In this case, lower gas-to-dust ratio by at least 1 order of magnitude is required, implying possible formation of a rocky planetary core.
  • Context. Little is known about the properties of the warm (Tdust >~ 150 K) debris disk material located close to the central star, which has a more direct link to the formation of terrestrial planets than the low temperature debris dust that has been detected to date. Aims. To discover new warm debris disk candidates that show large 18 micron excess and estimate the fraction of stars with excess based on the AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared All-Sky Survey data. Methods. We have searched for point sources detected in the AKARI/IRC All-Sky Survey, which show a positional match with A-M dwarf stars in the Tycho-2 Spectral Type Catalogue and exhibit excess emission at 18 micron compared to that expected from the Ks magnitude in the 2MASS catalogue. Results. We find 24 warm debris candidates including 8 new candidates among A-K stars. The apparent debris disk frequency is estimated to be 2.8 +/- 0.6%. We also find that A stars and solar-type FGK stars have different characteristics of the inner component of the identified debris disk candidates --- while debris disks around A stars are cooler and consistent with steady-state evolutionary model of debris disks, those around FGK stars tend to be warmer and cannot be explained by the steady-state model.
  • The Leonids show meteor storms in a period of 33 years, and known as one of the most active meteor showers. It has recently shown a meteor stream consisting of several narrow dust trails made by meteoroids ejected from a parent comet. Hence, an analysis of the temporal behavior of the meteor flux is important to study the structure of the trails. However, statistical inference for the count data is not an easy task, because of its Poisson characteristics. We carried out a wide-field video observation of the Leonid meteor storm in 2001. We formulated a state-of-the-art statistical analysis, which is called a self-organizing state space model, to infer the true behavior of the dust density of the trails properly from the meteor count data. {}From this analysis, we found that the trails have a fairly smooth spatial structure, with small and dense clumps that cause a temporal burst of meteor flux. We also proved that the time behavior (trend) of the fluxes of bright meteors and that of faint meteors are significantly different. In addition we comment on some other application of the self-organizing state-space model in fields related to astronomy and astrophysics.
  • We report Herschel and AKARI photometric observations at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths of the debris disk around the F3V star HD 15407A, in which the presence of an extremely large amount of warm dust (~500-600 K) has been suggested by mid-infrared (MIR) photometry and spectroscopy. The observed flux densities of the debris disk at 60-160 micron are clearly above the photospheric level of the star, suggesting excess emission at FIR as well as at MIR wavelengths previously reported. The observed FIR excess emission is consistent with the continuum level extrapolated from the MIR excess, suggesting that it originates in the inner warm debris dust and cold dust (~50-130 K) is absent in the outer region of the disk. The absence of cold dust does not support a late heavy bombardment-like event as an origin of the large amount of warm debris dust around HD 15047A.
  • We report an intriguing debris disk towards the F3V star HD 15407A, in which an extremely large amount of warm fine dust (~ 10^(-7) M_Earth) is detected. The dust temperature is derived as ~ 500-600 K and the location of the debris dust is estimated as 0.6-1.0 AU from the central star, a terrestrial planet region. The fractional luminosity of the debris disk is ~ 0.005, which is much larger than those predicted by steady-state models of the debris disk produced by planetesimal collisions. The mid-infrared spectrum obtained by Spitzer indicates the presence of abundant micron-sized silica dust, suggesting that the dust comes from the surface layer of differentiated large rocky bodies and might be trapped around the star.
  • Strange-looking dust cloud around asteroid (596) Scheila was discovered on 2010 December 11.44-11.47. Unlike normal cometary tails, it consisted of three tails and faded within two months. We constructed a model to reproduce the morphology of the dust cloud based on the laboratory measurement of high velocity impacts and the dust dynamics. As the result, we succeeded in the reproduction of peculiar dust cloud by an impact-driven ejecta plume consisting of an impact cone and downrange plume. Assuming an impact angle of 45 deg, our model suggests that a decameter-sized asteroid collided with (596) Scheila from the direction of (alpha, delta) = (60deg, -40deg) in J2000 coordinates on 2010 December 3. The maximum ejection velocity of the dust particles exceeded 100 m/s. Our results suggest that the surface of (596) Scheila consists of materials with low tensile strength.
  • We present the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the main-sequence star HD165014, which is a warm (>~ 200 K) debris disk candidate discovered by the AKARI All-Sky Survey. The star possesses extremely large excess emission at wavelengths longer than 5 \mum. The detected flux densities at 10 and 20 \mum are ~ 10 and ~ 30 times larger than the predicted photospheric emission, respectively. The excess emission is attributable to the presence of circumstellar warm dust. The dust temperature is estimated as 300-750 K, corresponding to the distance of 0.7-4.4 AU from the central star. Significant fine-structured features are seen in the spectrum and the peak positions are in good agreement with those of crystalline enstatite. Features of crystalline forsterite are not significantly seen. HD165014 is the first debris disk sample that has enstatite as a dominant form of crystalline silicate rather than forsterite. Possible formation of enstatite dust from differentiated parent bodies is suggested according to the solar system analog. The detection of an enstatite-rich debris disk in the current study suggests the presence of large bodies and a variety of silicate dust processing in warm debris disks.
  • Photometry of the A0 V main-sequence star HD 106797 with AKARI and Gemini/T-ReCS is used to detect excess emission over the expected stellar photospheric emission between 10 and 20 micron, which is best attributed to hot circumstellar debris dust surrounding the star. The temperature of the debris dust is derived as Td ~ 190 K by assuming that the excess emission is approximated by a single temperature blackbody. The derived temperature suggests that the inner radius of the debris disk is ~ 14 AU. The fractional luminosity of the debris disk is 1000 times brighter than that of our own zodiacal cloud. The existence of such a large amount of hot dust around HD 106797 cannot be accounted for by a simple model of the steady state evolution of a debris disk due to collisions, and it is likely that transient events play a significant role. Our data also show a narrow spectral feature between 11 and 12 micron attributable to crystalline silicates, suggesting that dust heating has occurred during the formation and evolution of the debris disk of HD 106797.
  • We present the observations of the reflection nebulae IC4954 and IC4955 region with the Infrared Camera (IRC) and the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) on board the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI during its performance verification phase. We obtained 7 band images from 7 to 160um with higher spatial resolution and higher sensitivities than previous observations. The mid-infrared color of the S9W (9um) and L18W (18um) bands shows a systematic variation around the exciting sources. The spatial variation in the mid-infrared color suggests that the star-formation in IC4954/4955 is progressing from south-west to north-east. The FIS data also clearly resolve two nebulae for the first time in the far-infrared. The FIS 4-band data from 65um to 160um allow us to correctly estimate the total infrared luminosity from the region, which is about one sixth of the energy emitted from the existing stellar sources. Five candidates for young stellar objects have been detected as point sources for the first time in the 11um image. They are located in the red S9W to L18W color regions, suggesting that current star-formation has been triggered by previous star-formation activities. A wide area map of the size of about 1 x 1 (deg^2) around the IC4954/4955 region was created from the AKARI mid-infrared all-sky survey data. Together with the HI 21cm data, it suggests a large hollow structure of a degree scale, on whose edge the IC4954/4955 region has been created, indicating star formation over three generations in largely different spatial scales.
  • Mid-infrared (MIR) images of the Herbig Ae star HD 142527 were obtained at 18.8 and 24.5 micron with the Subaru/COMICS. Bright extended arc-like emission (outer disk) is recognized at r=0.85" together with a strong central source (inner disk) and a gap around r=0.6" in the both images. Thermal emission of the eastern side is much brighter than that of the western side in the MIR. We estimate the dust size as a few micron from the observed color of the extended emission and the distance from the star. The dust temperature T and the optical depth tau of the MIR emitting dust are also derived from the two images as T=82+/-1K, tau=0.052+/-0.001 for the eastern side and T=85+/-3K, tau=0.018+/-0.001 for the western side. The observed asymmetry in the brightness can be attributed to the difference in the optical depth of the MIR emitting dust. To account for the present observations, we propose an inclined disk model, in which the outer disk is inclined along the east-west direction with the eastern side being in the far side and the inner rim of the outer disk in the eatern side is exposed directly to us. The proposed model can successfully account for the MIR observations as well as near-infrared (NIR) images of the scattering light, in which the asymmetry is seen in the opposite sense and the forward scattering light (near side -- western side) is brighter.