• Recent studies of core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of silicene on ZrB$_2$(0001) were found to be inconsistent with the density of states (DOS) of a planar-like structure that has been proposed as the ground state by density functional theory (DFT). To resolve the discrepancy, a reexamination of the XPS spectra and direct theoretical access of accurate single-particle excitation energies are desired. By analyzing the XPS data using symmetric Voigt functions, different binding energies and its sequence of Si $2p$ orbitals can be assigned from previously reported ones where asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions are adopted. Theoretically, we have adopted an approach developed very recently, which follows the sophisticated $\Delta$ self-consistent field ($\Delta$SCF) methods, to study the single-particle excitation of core states. In the calculations, each single-particle energy and the renormalized core-hole charge density are calculated straightforwardly via two SCF calculations. By comparing the results, the theoretical core-level absolute binding energies including the splitting due to spin-orbit coupling are in good agreement with the observed high-resolution XPS spectra. The good agreement not only resolves the puzzling discrepancy between experiment and theory (DOS) but also advocates the success of DFT in describing many-body interactions of electrons at the surface.
  • In experiment and theory, we resolve the mechanism of ultrafast optical magnon excitation in antiferromagnetic NiO. We employ time-resolved optical two-color pump-probe measurements to study the coherent non-thermal spin dynamics. Optical pumping and probing with linearly and circularly polarized light along the optic axis of the NiO crystal scrutinizes the mechanism behind the ultrafast optical magnon excitation. A phenomenological symmetry-based theory links these experimental results to expressions for the optically induced magnetization via the inverse Faraday effect and the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect. We obtain striking agreement between experiment and theory that, furthermore, allows us to extract information about the spin domain distribution. We also find that in NiO the energy transfer into the magnon mode via the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect is about three orders of magnitude more efficient than via the inverse Faraday effect.
  • Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for the existence of a glassy state, that we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 (SCGO(p)), a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s=3/2) ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular system of bi-pyramids. Our experimental data shows that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: a distinct exotic glassy state, which we call a "spin jam", for high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration, (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states in dense frustrated magnets can be understood.
  • We report on the electronic ground state of a layered perovskite vanadium oxide Sr$_2$VO$_4$ studied by the combined use of synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) and muon spin rotation/relaxation ($\mu$SR) techniques, where $\mu$SR measurements were extended down to 30 mK. We found an intermediate orthorhombic phase between $T_{\rm c2} \sim$~130 K and $T_{\rm c1} \sim$~100 K, whereas a tetragonal phase appears for $T > T_{\rm c2}$ and $T < T_{\rm c1}$. The absence of long-range magnetic order was confirmed by $\mu$SR at the reentrant tetragonal phase below $T_{\rm c1}$, where the relative enhancement in the $c$-axis length versus that of the $a$-axis length was observed. However, no clear indication of the lowering of the tetragonal lattice symmetry with superlattice modulation, which is expected in the orbital order state with superstructure of $d_{yz}$ and $d_{zx}$ orbitals, was observed by SR-XRD below $T_{\rm c1}$. Instead, it was inferred from $\mu$SR that a magnetic state developed below $T_{\rm c0} \sim$~10 K, which was characterized by the highly inhomogeneous and fluctuating local magnetic fields down to 30 mK. We argue that the anomalous magnetic ground state below $T_{\rm c0}$ originates from the coexistence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic correlations.
  • A magneto-optical survey was conducted for HgCr$_2$O$_4$ powder samples under pulsed high magnetic fields of up to 55 T. Intensity changes in magnetic fields observed for the exciton-magnon-phonon optical transition spectra coincide well with those of magnetization, lattice distortion from X-ray diffraction, and electron-magnetic resonances. The last-ordered phase was detected prior to the fully polarized magnetic phase, similarly to the other chromium spinel oxide, ZnCr$_2$O$_4$ and CdCr$_2$O$_4$.
  • We report magnetic properties of the layered itinerant system, Sr$_{1-x}$Ca$_x$Co$_2$P$_2$ in the magnetic field up to 70 T. As for the exchange-enhanced Pauli paramagnetic metal SrCo$_2$P$_2$, the magnetization curve shows two characteristic anomalies. The low-field anomaly is small without obvious hysteresis, and the high-field one is a typical behavior of the itinerant-electron metamagnetic transition (IEMT). Such a successive transition in the magnetization curve cannot be explained by the conventional phenomenological theory for IEMT due to the Landau expansion of the free energy, but by the extended Landau expansion theory with distinguishable two energy states. In the systematical study of Sr$_{1-x}$Ca$_x$Co$_2$P$_2$, furthermore, the metamagnetic transition field decreases and goes to zero as $x$ increases up to 0.5, indicating that the ferromagnetic quantum critical point (QCP) exists at $x \sim 0.5$.
  • We have investigated the magnetic-field induced phases of a typical three-dimensional frustrated magnet, CdCr$_2$O$_4$, in magnetic fields of up to 120 T that is generated by the single-turn coil techniques. We focused on magnetic phase transitions in proximity of a saturated magnetization moment. We utilized both the electromagnetic induction method using magnetic pick-up coils and magneto-optical spectroscopies of the $d$-$d$ transitions and the exciton-magnon-phonon transitions to study the magnetic properties subjected to ultra-high magnetic fields. Anomalies were observed in magneto-optical absorption intensity as well as differential magnetization prior to a fully polarized magnetic phase (a vacuum state in the magnon picture), revealing a novel magnetic phase associated with changes in both crystal and magnetic structures accompanied by the first order phase transition. Magnetic superfluid state such as an umbrella-like magnetic structure or a spin nematic state, is proposed as a candidate for the novel magnetic phase, which is found universal in the series of chromium spinel oxides, $A$Cr$_2$O$_4$ ($A$ = Zn, Cd, Hg).
  • The Faraday rotation and magneto-optical absorption spectral measurements were conducted to reveal the full-magnetization process and map out a magnetic phase diagram of a typical geometrical frustrated magnet, ZnCr2O4, by using the electromagnetic flux compression method in ultra-magnetic fields up to 600 T. A fully polarized ferromagnetic phase is observed in which the absorption spectra associated with an exciton-magnon-phonon transition disappears. Furthermore, prior to the fully polarized ferromagnetic phase above 410 T, we found a novel magnetic phase above 350 T followed by a canted 3:1 phase.
  • The Faraday rotation technique is used to map out the finite-temperature phase diagram of the prototypical frustrated magnet ZnCr2O4, in magnetic fields of up to 190 T generated by the single-turn coil method. We find evidence for a number of magnetic phase transitions, which are well-described by the theory based on spin-lattice coupling. In addition to the 1/2 plateau and a 3:1 canted phase, a 2:1:1 canted phase is found for the first time in chromium spinel oxides, which has been predicted by a theory of Penc et al. to realize in a small spin-lattice coupling limit. Both the new 2:1:1 and the 3:1 phase are regarded as the supersolid phases according to a magnetic analogy of Matsuda and Tsuneto, and Liu and Fisher.
  • Coherent spin oscillations were non-thermally induced by circularly polarized pulses in fully compensated antiferromagnetic NiO. This effect is attributed to an entirely new mechanism of the action, on the spins, of the effective magnetic field generated by an inverse Faraday effect. The novelty of this mechanism is that spin oscillations are driven by the time derivative of the effective magnetic field acting even on "pure" antiferromagnets with zero net magnetic moment in the ground state. The measured frequencies (1.07 THz and 140 GHz) of the spin oscillations correspond to the out-of-plane and in-plane modes of antiferromagnetic magnons.
  • Magnetization plateaux, visible as anomalies in magnetic susceptibility at low temperatures, are one of the hallmarks of frustrated magnetism. An extremely robust half-magnetization plateau is observed in the spinel oxides CdCr2O4 and HgCr2O4, where it is accompanied by a substantial lattice distortion. We give an overview of the present state experiment for CdCr2O4 and HgCr2O4, and show how such a half-magnetization plateau arises quite naturally in a simple model of these systems, once coupling to the lattice is taken into account.