• A family of repressor networks is proposed as a simple model of gene regulatory networks. We analytically show three topological classes of the repressor networks, each of which exhibits distinctly growing complexity of spatiotemporal expressions starting from nearly homogeneous states. Further, by focusing on locally interacting cases such as chain networks, including a generalized repressilator, or feedforward(back)-loop networks, spatiotemporal expressions in the long time regime and elusive relationships between such different networks are discussed in detail.
  • We consider a cyclically competing species model on a ring with global mixing at finite rate, which corresponds to the well-known Lotka-Volterra equation in the limit of infinite mixing rate. Within a perturbation analysis of the model from the infinite mixing rate, we provide analytical evidence that extinction occurs deterministically at sufficiently large but finite values of the mixing rate for any species number $N\ge3$. Further, by focusing on the cases of rather small species numbers, we discuss numerical results concerning the trajectories toward such deterministic extinction, including global bifurcations caused by changing the mixing rate.
  • We study the problem of estimating the origin of an epidemic outbreak -- given a contact network and a snapshot of epidemic spread at a certain time, determine the infection source. Finding the source is important in different contexts of computer or social networks. We assume that the epidemic spread follows the most commonly used susceptible-infected-recovered model. We introduce an inference algorithm based on dynamic message-passing equations, and we show that it leads to significant improvement of performance compared to existing approaches. Importantly, this algorithm remains efficient in the case where one knows the state of only a fraction of nodes.
  • A class of kinetically constrained models with reflection symmetry is proposed as an extension of the Fredrickson-Andersen model. It is proved that the proposed model on the square lattice exhibits a freezing transition at a non-trivial density. It is conjectured by numerical experiments that the known mechanism of the singular behaviors near the freezing transition in a previously studied model (spiral model) is not responsible for that in the proposed model.
  • A simple model of cyclically competing species on a directed graph with quenched disorder is proposed as an extension of the rock-paper-scissors model. By assuming that the effects of loops in a directed random graph can be ignored in the thermodynamic limit, it is proved for any finite disorder that the system fixates to a frozen configuration when the species number $s$ is larger than the spatial connectivity $c$, and otherwise stays active. Nontrivial lower and upper bounds for the persistence probability of a site never changing its state are also analytically computed. The obtained bounds and numerical simulations support the existence of a phase transition as a function of disorder for $1<c_l(s)\le c <s$, with a $s$-dependent threshold of the connectivity $c_l(s)$.
  • We propose a simple, exactly solvable, model of interface growth in a random medium that is a variant of the zero-temperature random-field Ising model on the Cayley tree. This model is shown to have a phase diagram (critical depinning field versus disorder strength) qualitatively similar to that obtained numerically on the cubic lattice. We then introduce a specifically tailored random graph that allows an exact asymptotic analysis of the height and width of the interface. We characterize the change of morphology of the interface as a function of the disorder strength, a change that is found to take place at a multicritical point along the depinning-transition line.
  • Oppositely driven binary particles with repulsive interactions on the square lattice are investigated at the zero-temperature limit. Two classes of steady states related to stuck configurations and lane formations have been constructed in systematic ways under certain conditions. A mean-field type analysis carried out using a percolation problem based on the constructed steady states provides an estimation of the phase diagram, which is qualitatively consistent with numerical simulations. Further, finite size effects in terms of lane formations are discussed.
  • The dynamical behaviours of a kinetically constrained spin model (Fredrickson-Andersen model) on a Bethe lattice are investigated by a perturbation analysis that provides exact final states above the nonergodic transition point. It is observed that the time-dependent solutions of the derived dynamical systems obtained by the perturbation analysis become systematically closer to the results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations as the order of a perturbation series is increased. This systematic perturbation analysis also clarifies the existence of a dynamical scaling law, which provides a implication for a universal relation between a size scale and a time scale near the nonergodic transition.
  • Glauber dynamics of a bond-diluted Ising model on a Bethe lattice (a random graph with fixed connectivity) is investigated by an approximate theory which provides exact results for equilibrium properties. The time-dependent solutions of the dynamical system derived by this method are in good agreement with the results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in almost all situations. Furthermore, the derived dynamical system exhibits a remarkable phenomenon that the magnetization shows multi-step relaxations at intermediate time scales in a low-temperature part of the Griffiths phase without bond percolation clusters.
  • The zero-temperature Glauber dynamics of the random-field Ising model describes various ubiquitous phenomena such as avalanches, hysteresis, and related critical phenomena. Here, for a model on a random graph with a special initial condition, we derive exactly an evolution equation for an order parameter. Through a bifurcation analysis of the obtained equation, we reveal a new class of cooperative slow dynamics with the determination of critical exponents.
  • Critical phenomena in globally coupled excitable elements are studied by focusing on a saddle-node bifurcation at the collective level. Critical exponents that characterize divergent fluctuations of interspike intervals near the bifurcation are calculated theoretically. The calculated values appear to be in good agreement with those determined by numerical experiments. The relevance of our results to jamming transitions is also mentioned.
  • Cooperative behaviors near the disorder-induced critical point in a random field Ising model are numerically investigated by analyzing time-dependent magnetization in ordering processes from a special initial condition. We find that the intensity of fluctuations of time-dependent magnetization, $\chi(t)$, attains a maximum value at a time $t=\tau$ in a normal phase and that $\chi(\tau)$ and $\tau$ exhibit divergences near the disorder-induced critical point. Furthermore, spin configurations around the time $\tau$ are characterized by a length scale, which also exhibits a divergence near the critical point. We estimate the critical exponents that characterize these power-law divergences by using a finite-size scaling method.