• We investigate the abundance and properties (especially, grain size) of dust in galaxy halos using available observational data in the literature. There are two major sets of data. One is (i) the reddening curves at redshifts $z\sim 1$ and 2 derived for Mg II absorbers, which are assumed to trace the medium in galaxy halos. The other is (ii) the cosmic extinction up to $z\sim 2$ mainly traced by distant background quasars. For (i), the observed reddening curves favor a grain radius of $a\sim 0.03~\mu$m for silicate, while graphite is not supported because of its strong 2175 \AA\ bump. Using amorphous carbon improves the fit to the reddening curves compared with graphite if the grain radius is $a\lesssim 0.03~\mu$m. For (ii), the cosmic extinction requires $\eta\gtrsim 10^{-2}$ ($\eta$ is the ratio of the halo dust mass to the stellar mass; the observationally suggested value is $\eta\sim 10^{-3}$) for silicate if $a\sim 0.03~\mu$m as suggested by the reddening curve constraint. Thus, for silicate, we do not find any grain radius that satisfies both (i) and (ii) unless the halo dust abundance is much larger than suggested by the observations. For amorphous carbon, in contrast, a wide range of grain radius ($a\sim 0.01$--0.3~$\mu$m) is accepted by the cosmic extinction; thus, we find that a grain radius range of $a\sim 0.01$--0.03 $\mu$m is supported by combining (i) and (ii). We also discuss the origin of dust in galaxy halos, focusing on the importance of grain size in the physical mechanism of dust supply to galaxy halos.
  • To investigate the evolution of dust in a cosmological volume, we perform hydrodynamic simulations, in which the enrichment of metals and dust is treated self-consistently with star formation and stellar feedback. We consider dust evolution driven by dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by sputtering, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering, and treat small and large grains separately to trace the grain size distribution. After confirming that our model nicely reproduces the observed relation between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity for nearby galaxies, we concentrate on the dust abundance over the cosmological volume in this paper. The comoving dust mass density has a peak at redshift $z\sim 1$-$2$, coincident with the observationally suggested dustiest epoch in the Universe. Throughout the history of the Universe, roughly 10 per cent of the dust is contained in the intergalactic medium (IGM), where only 1/3-1/4 of the dust survives against dust destruction by sputtering. We also show that the dust mass function is roughly reproduced at galactic dust mass $\lesssim 10^8$ M$_\odot$, while the massive end still has a discrepancy, which indicates the necessity of improving the feedback model. In addition, our model broadly reproduces the observed radial profile of dust surface density in the circum-galactic medium (CGM). While our model satisfies the observational constraints for the dust extinction over the cosmological distance, it predicts that the dust in the CGM and IGM is dominated by large ($> 0.03~\mu$m) grains, which is in tension with the observed steep reddening curves in the CGM.
  • There are two major theoretical issues for the star formation law (the relation between the surface densities of molecular gas and star formation rate on a galaxy scale): (i) At low metallicity, it is not obvious that star-forming regions are rich in H$_2$ because the H$_2$ formation rate depends on the dust abundance; and (ii) whether or not CO really traces H$_2$ is uncertain, especially at low metallicity. To clarify these issues, we use a hydrodynamic simulation of an isolated disc galaxy with a spatial resolution of a few tens parsecs. The evolution of dust abundance and grain size distribution is treated consistently with the metal enrichment and the physical state of the interstellar medium. We compute the H$_2$ and CO abundances using a subgrid post-processing model based on the dust abundance and the dissociating radiation field calculated in the simulation. We find that when the metallicity is $\lesssim 0.4$ Z$_\odot$ ($t<1$ Gyr), H$_2$ is not a good tracer of star formation rate because H$_2$-rich regions are limited to dense compact regions. At $Z\gtrsim 0.8$ Z$_\odot$, a tight star formation law is established for both H$_2$ and CO. At old ($t \sim 10$ Gyr) ages, we also find that adopting the so-called MRN grain size distribution with an appropriate dust-to-metal ratio over the entire disc gives reasonable estimates for the H$_2$ and CO abundances. For CO, improving the spatial resolution of the simulation is important while the H$_2$ abundance is not sensitive to sub-resolution structures at $Z\gtrsim 0.4$ Z$_\odot$.
  • We aim at constraining the dust mass in high-redshift ($z\gtrsim 5$) galaxies using the upper limits obtained by ALMA in combination with the rest-frame UV--optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). For SED fitting, because of degeneracy between dust extinction and stellar age, we focus on two extremes: continuous star formation (Model A) and instantaneous star formation (Model B). We apply these models to Himiko (as a representative UV-bright object) and a composite SED of $z>5$ Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). For Himiko, Model A requires a significant dust extinction, which leads to a high dust temperature $>70$ K for consistency with the ALMA upper limit. This high dust temperature puts a strong upper limit on the total dust mass $M_\mathrm{d}\lesssim 2\times 10^6$ M$_{\odot}$, and the dust mass produced per supernova (SN) $m_\mathrm{d,SN}\lesssim 0.1$ M$_{\odot}$. Such a low $m_\mathrm{d,SN}$ suggests significant loss of dust by reverse shock destruction or outflow, and implies that SNe are not the dominant source of dust at high $z$. Model B allows $M_\mathrm{d}\sim 2\times 10^7$ M$_{\odot}$ and $m_\mathrm{d,SN}\sim 0.3$ M$_{\odot}$.} We could distinguish between Models A and B if we observe Himiko at {wavelength $<$ 1.2 mm by ALMA. For the LBG sample, we obtain $M_\mathrm{d}\lesssim 2\times 10^6$ M$_{\odot}$ for a typical LBG at $z>5$, but this only puts an upper limit for $m_\mathrm{d,SN}$ as $\sim 2$ M$_{\odot}$. This clarifies the importance of observing UV-bright objects (like Himiko) to constrain the dust production by SNe.
  • To understand the evolution of extinction curve, we calculate the dust evolution in a galaxy using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations incorporating stellar dust production, dust destruction in supernova shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering. The dust species are separated into carbonaceous dust and silicate. The evolution of grain size distribution is considered by dividing grain population into large and small gains, which allows us to estimate extinction curves. We examine the dependence of extinction curves on the position, gas density, and metallicity in the galaxy, and find that extinction curves are flat at $t \lesssim 0.3$ Gyr because stellar dust production dominates the total dust abundance. The 2175 \AA\ bump and far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise become prominent after dust growth by accretion. At $t \gtrsim 3$ Gyr, shattering works efficiently in the outer disc and low density regions, so extinction curves show a very strong 2175 \AA\ bump and steep FUV rise. The extinction curves at $t\gtrsim 3$ Gyr are consistent with the Milky Way extinction curve, which implies that we successfully included the necessary dust processes in the model. The outer disc component caused by stellar feedback has an extinction curves with a weaker 2175 \AA\ bump and flatter FUV slope. The strong contribution of carbonaceous dust tends to underproduce the FUV rise in the Small Magellanic Cloud extinction curve, which supports selective loss of small carbonaceous dust in the galaxy. The snapshot at young ages also explain the extinction curves in high-redshift quasars.
  • We have recently suggested that dust growth in the cold gas phase dominates the dust abundance in elliptical galaxies while dust is efficiently destroyed in the hot X-ray emitting plasma (hot gas). In order to understand the dust evolution in elliptical galaxies, we construct a simple model that includes dust growth in the cold gas and dust destruction in the hot gas. We also take into account the effect of mass exchange between these two gas components induced by active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We survey reasonable ranges of the relevant parameters in the model and find that AGN feedback cycles actually produce a variety in cold gas mass and dust-to-gas ratio. By comparing with an observational sample of nearby elliptical galaxies, we find that, although the dust-to-gas ratio varies by an order of magnitude in our model, the entire range of the observed dust-to-gas ratios is difficult to be reproduced under a single parameter set. Variation of the dust growth efficiency is the most probable solution to explain the large variety in dust-to-gas ratio of the observational sample. Therefore, dust growth can play a central role in creating the variation in dust-to-gas ratio through the AGN feedback cycle and through the variation in dust growth efficiency.
  • The CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor ($X_\mathrm{CO}$) is known to correlate with the metallicity ($Z$). The dust abundance, which is related to the metallicity, is responsible for this correlation through dust shielding of dissociating photons and H$_2$ formation on dust surfaces. In this paper, we investigate how the relation between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity ($\mathcal{D}$--$Z$ relation) affects the H$_2$ and CO abundances (and $X_\mathrm{CO}$) of a `molecular' cloud. For the $\mathcal{D}$--$Z$ relation, we adopt a dust evolution model developed in our previous work, which treats the evolution of not only dust abundance but also grain sizes in a galaxy. Shielding of dissociating photons and H$_2$ formation on dust are solved consistently with the dust abundance and grain sizes. As a consequence, our models {predict consistent metallicity dependence of $X_\mathrm{CO}$ with observational data}. Among various processes driving dust evolution, grain growth by accretion has the largest impact on the $X_\mathrm{CO}$--$Z$ relation. The other processes also have some impacts on the $X_\mathrm{CO}$--$Z$ relation, but their effects are minor compared with the scatter of the observational data at the metallicity range ($Z\gtrsim 0.1$ Z$_\odot$) where CO could be detected. We also find that dust condensation in stellar ejecta has a dramatic impact on the H$_2$ abundance at low metallicities ($\lesssim 0.1$ Z$_\odot$), relevant for damped Lyman $\alpha$ systems and nearby dwarf galaxies, and that the grain size dependence of H$_2$ formation rate is also important.
  • We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isolated galaxy with a new treatment for dust formation and destruction. To this aim, we treat dust and metal production self-consistently with star formation and supernova feedback. For dust, we consider a simplified model of grain size distribution by representing the entire range of grain sizes with large and small grains. We include dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by supernova (SN) shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering. We find that the assumption of fixed dust-to-metal mass ratio becomes no longer valid when the galaxy is older than 0.2 Gyr, at which point the grain growth by accretion starts to contribute to the nonlinear rise of dust-to-gas ratio. As expected in our previous one-zone model, shattering triggers grain growth by accretion since it increases the total surface area of grains. Coagulation becomes significant when the galaxy age is greater than $\sim$ 1 Gyr: at this epoch the abundance of small grains becomes high enough to raise the coagulation rate of small grains. We further compare the radial profiles of dust-to-gas ratio $(\mathcal{D})$ and dust-to-metal ratio $(\mathcal{D}/Z)$ (i.e., depletion) at various ages with observational data. We find that our simulations broadly reproduce the radial gradients of dust-to-gas ratio and depletion. In the early epoch ($\lesssim 0.3$ Gyr), the radial gradient of $\mathcal{D}$ follows the metallicity gradient with $\mathcal{D}/Z$ determined by the dust condensation efficiency in stellar ejecta, while the $\mathcal{D}$ gradient is steeper than the $Z$ gradient at the later epochs because of grain growth by accretion. The framework developed in this paper is applicable to any SPH-based galaxy evolution simulations including cosmological ones.
  • Extinction curves, especially those in the Milky Way (MW), the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), have provided us with a clue to the dust properties in the nearby Universe. We examine whether or not these extinction curves can be explained by well known dust evolution processes. We treat the dust production in stellar ejecta, destruction in supernova shocks, dust growth by accretion and coagulation, and dust disruption by shattering. To make a survey of the large parameter space possible, we simplify the treatment of the grain size distribution evolution by adopting the `two-size approximation', in which we divide the grain population into small ($\lesssim 0.03~\mu$m) and large ($\gtrsim 0.03~\mu$m) grains. It is confirmed that the MW extinction curve can be reproduced in reasonable ranges for the time-scale of the above processes with a silicate-graphite mixture. This indicates that the MW extinction curve is a natural consequence of the dust evolution through the above processes. We also find that the same models fail to reproduce the SMC/LMC extinction curves. Nevertheless, this failure can be remedied by giving higher supernova destruction rates for small carbonaceous dust and considering amorphous carbon for carbonaceous dust; these modification fall in fact in line with previous studies. Therefore, we conclude that the current dust evolution scenario composed of the aforementioned processes is successful in explaining the extinction curves. All the extinction curves favor efficient interstellar processing of dust, especially, strong grain growth by accretion and coagulation.
  • Grain growth during star formation affects the physical and chemical processes in the evolution of star-forming clouds. We investigate the origin of the millimeter (mm)-sized grains recently observed in Class I protostellar envelopes. We use the coagulation model developed in our previous paper and find that a hydrogen number density of as high as $10^{10}~{\rm cm^{-3}}$, instead of the typical density $10^5~{\rm cm^{-3}}$, is necessary for the formation of mm-sized grains. Thus, we test a hypothesis that such large grains are transported to the envelope from the inner, denser parts, finding that gas drag by outflow efficiently "launches" the large grains as long as the central object has not grown to $\gtrsim 0.1$ M$_{\odot}$. By investigating the shattering effect on the mm-sized grains, we ensure that the large grains are not significantly fragmented after being injected in the envelope. We conclude that the mm-sized grains observed in the protostellar envelopes are not formed in the envelopes but formed in the inner parts of the star-forming regions and transported to the envelopes before a significant mass growth of the central object, and that they survive in the envelopes.
  • Formation and evolution of galaxies have been a central driving force in the studies of galaxies and cosmology. Recent studies provided a global picture of cosmic star formation history. However, what drives the evolution of star formation activities in galaxies has long been a matter of debate. The key factor of the star formation is the transition of hydrogen from atomic to molecular state, since the star formation is associated with the molecular phase. This transition is also strongly coupled with chemical evolution, because dust grains, i.e., tiny solid particles of heavy elements, play a critical role in molecular formation. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of neutral-molecular gas transition, star formation and chemical enrichment is necessary to clarify the galaxy formation and evolution. Here we present the activity of SKA-JP galaxy evolution sub-science working group (subSWG) Our activity is focused on three epochs: z \sim 0, 1, and z > 3. At z \sim 0, we try to construct a unified picture of atomic and molecular hydrogen through nearby galaxies in terms of metallicity and other various ISM properties. Up to intermediate redshifts z \sim 1, we explore scaling relations including gas and star formation properties, like the main sequence and the Kennicutt-Schmidt law of star forming galaxies. To connect the global studies with spatially-resolved investigations, such relations will be plausibly a viable way. For high redshift objects, the absorption lines of HI 21-cm line will be a very promising observable to explore the properties of gas in galaxies. By these studies, we will surely witness a real revolution in the studies of galaxies by SKA.
  • Some very large (>0.1 um) presolar grains are sampled in meteorites. We reconsider the lifetime of very large grains (VLGs) in the interstellar medium focusing on interstellar shattering caused by turbulence-induced large velocity dispersions. This path has never been noted as a dominant mechanism of destruction. We show that, if interstellar shattering is the main mechanism of destruction of VLGs, their lifetime is estimated to be $\gtrsim 10^8$ yr; in particular, very large SiC grains can survive cosmic-ray exposure time. However, most presolar SiC grains show residence times significantly shorter than 1 Gyr, which may indicate that there is a more efficient mechanism than shattering in destroying VLGs, or that VLGs have larger velocity dispersions than 10 km s$^{-1}$. We also argue that the enhanced lifetime of SiC relative to graphite can be the reason why we find SiC among $\mu$m-sized presolar grains, while the abundance of SiC in the normal interstellar grains is much lower than graphite.
  • Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy for the next ten years. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (~ 4 arcsec for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205 um lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so that they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming regions can also be explored since it traces the dust population contributing to the THz spectral peak. For survey-type observations, we focus on ``sub-THz'' extragalactic surveys, whose uniqueness is to detect galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1--2, where the dust emission per comoving volume is the largest in the history of the Universe. Finally we explore possibilities of flexible time scheduling, which enables us to monitor active galactic nuclei, and to target gamma-ray burst afterglows. For these objects, THz and submillimeter wavelength ranges have not yet been explored.
  • We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain growth after the gas cools down. Dust growth by the accretion of gas-phase metals in the cold medium increase the dust-to-gas ratio up to $\sim 10^{-3}$ if this process lasts >10/(n_H/10^3 cm^{-3}) Myr, where $n_\mathrm{H}$ is the number density of hydrogen nuclei. We show that the accretion of gas-phase metals is a viable mechanism of increasing the dust abundance in elliptical galaxies to a level consistent with observations, and that the steepness of observed extinction curves is better explained with grain growth by accretion.
  • The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively) are observed to have characteristic dust extinction curves that are quite different from those of the Galaxy (e.g., strength of the 2175 A bump). Although the dust composition and size distribution of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) that can self-consistently explain their observed extinction curves have been already proposed, it remain unclear whether and how the required dust properties can be achieved in the formation histories of the MCs. We therefore investigate the time evolution of the dust properties of the MCs and thereby derive their extinction curves using one-zone chemical evolution models with formation and evolution of small and large silicate and carbonaceous dust grains and dusty winds associated with starburst events. We find that the observed SMC extinction curve without a conspicuous 2175 A bump can be reproduced well by our SMC model, if the small carbon grains can be selectively lost through the dust wind during the latest starburst about 0.2 Gyr ago. We also find that the LMC extinction curve with a weak 2175 A bump can be reproduced by our LMC model with less efficient removal of dust through dust wind. We discuss possible physical reasons for different dust wind efficiencies between silicate and graphite and among galaxies.
  • The infrared-to-X-ray (IRX) flux ratio traces the relative importance of dust cooling to gas cooling in astrophysical plasma such as supernova remnants (SNRs). We derive IRX ratios of SNRs in the LMC using Spitzer and Chandra SNR survey data and compare them with those of Galactic SNRs. IRX ratios of all the SNRs in the sample are found to be moderately greater than unity, indicating that dust grains are a more efficient coolant than gas although gas cooling may not be negligible. The IRX ratios of the LMC SNRs are systematically lower than those of the Galactic SNRs. As both dust cooling and gas cooling pertain to the properties of the interstellar medium, the lower IRX ratios of the LMC SNRs may reflect the characteristics of the LMC, and the lower dust-to- gas ratio (a quarter of the Galactic value) is likely to be the most significant factor. The observed IRX ratios are compared with theoretical predictions that yield IRX ratios an order of magnitude larger. This discrepancy may originate from the dearth of dust in the remnants due to either the local variation of the dust abundance in the preshock medium with respect to the canonical abundance or the dust destruction in the postshock medium. The non-equilibrium ionization cooling of hot gas, in particular for young SNRs, may also cause the discrepancy. Finally, we discuss implications for the dominant cooling mechanism of SNRs in low-metallicity galaxies.
  • A planned rapid submillimeter (submm) Gamma Ray Burst (GRBs) follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT) is presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high-altitude and dry weather porvides excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1) systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS) in the early afterglow phase, (2) characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3) detections of GRBs as a result of the explosion of first-generation stars result of GRBs at a high redshift through systematic rapid follow ups. The light curves and spectra calculated by available theoretical models clearly show that the GLT could play a crucial role in these studies.
  • Full calculations of the evolution of grain size distribution in galaxies are in general computationally heavy. In this paper, we propose a simple model of dust enrichment in a galaxy with a simplified treatment of grain size distribution by imposing a `two-size approximation'; that is, all the grain population is represented by small (grain radius a < 0.03 micron) and large (a > 0.03 micron) grains. We include in the model dust supply from stellar ejecta, destruction in supernova shocks, dust growth by accretion, grain growth by coagulation and grain disruption by shattering, considering how these processes work on the small and large grains. We show that this simple framework reproduces the main features found in full calculations of grain size distributions as follows. The dust enrichment starts with the supply of large grains from stars. At a metallicity level referred to as the critical metallicity of accretion, the abundance of the small grains formed by shattering becomes large enough to rapidly increase the grain abundance by accretion. Associated with this epoch, the mass ratio of the small grains to the large grains reaches the maximum. After that, this ratio converges to the value determined by the balance between shattering and coagulation, and the dust-to-metal ratio is determined by the balance between accretion and shock destruction. With a Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the simplicity of our model has an advantage in predicting statistical properties. We also show some applications for predicting observational dust properties such as extinction curves.
  • We present the detection and analysis of molecular hydrogen emission toward ten interstellar regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We examined low-resolution infrared spectral maps of twelve regions obtained with the Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS). The pure rotational 0--0 transitions of H$_2$ at 28.2 and 17.1${\,\rm \mu m}$ are detected in the IRS spectra for ten regions. The higher level transitions are mostly upper limit measurements except for three regions, where a 3$\sigma$ detection threshold is achieved for lines at 12.2 and 8.6${\,\rm \mu m}$. The excitation diagrams of the detected H$_2$ transitions are used to determine the warm H$_2$ gas column density and temperature. The single-temperature fits through the lower transition lines give temperatures in the range $86-137\,{\rm K}$. The bulk of the excited H$_2$ gas is found at these temperatures and contributes $\sim$5-17% to the total gas mass. We find a tight correlation of the H$_2$ surface brightness with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and total infrared emission, which is a clear indication of photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. We find the excitation of H$_2$ by this process is equally efficient in both atomic and molecular dominated regions. We also present the correlation of the warm H$_2$ physical conditions with dust properties. The warm H$_2$ mass fraction and excitation temperature show positive correlations with the average starlight intensity, again supporting H$_2$ excitation in photodissociation regions.
  • The discoveries of huge amounts of dust and unusual extinction curves in high-redshift quasars (z > 4) cast challenging issues on the origin and properties of dust in the early universe. In this Letter, we investigate the evolutions of dust content and extinction curve in a high-z quasar, based on the dust evolution model taking account of grain size distribution. First, we show that the Milky-Way extinction curve is reproduced by introducing a moderate fraction (~0.2) of dense molecular-cloud phases in the interstellar medium for a graphite-silicate dust model. Then we show that the peculier extinction curves in high-z quasars can be explained by taking a much higher molecular-cloud fraction (>0.5), which leads to more efficient grain growth and coagulation, and by assuming amorphous carbon instead of graphite. The large dust content in high-z quasar hosts is also found to be a natural consequence of the enhanced dust growth. These results indicate that grain growth and coagulation in molecular clouds are key processes that can increase the dust mass and change the size distribution of dust in galaxies, and that, along with a different dust composition, can contribute to shape the extinction curve.
  • We apply the time evolution of grain size distributions by accretion and coagulation found in our previous work to the modelling of the wavelength dependence of interstellar linear polarization. We especially focus on the parameters of the Serkowski curve $K$ and $\lambda_{\max}$ characterizing the width and the maximum wavelength of this curve, respectively. We use aligned silicate and non-aligned carbonaceous spheroidal particles with different aspect ratios $a/b$. The imperfect alignment of grains with sizes larger than a cut-off size $r_{V,\rm cut}$ is considered. We find that the evolutionary effects on the polarization curve are negligible in the original model with commonly used material parameters (hydrogen number density $n_\mathrm{H}=10^3$ cm$^{-3}$, gas temperature $T_\mathrm{gas}=10$~K, and the sticking probability for accretion $S_\mathrm{acc}=0.3$). Therefore, we apply the tuned model where the coagulation threshold of silicate is removed. In this model, $\lambda_{\max}$ displaces to the longer wavelengths and the polarization curve becomes wider ($K$ reduces) on time-scales $\sim (30 - 50) (n_\mathrm{H}/10^3 \mathrm{cm}^{-3})^{-1}$ Myr. The tuned models at $T < 30 (n_\mathrm{H}/10^3 \mathrm{cm}^{-3})^{-1} $ Myr and different values of the parameters $r_{V,\rm cut}$ can also explain the observed trend between $K$ and $\lambda_{\max}$. It is significant that the evolutionary effect appears in the perpendicular direction to the effect of $r_{V,\rm cut}$ on the $K$ - $\lambda_{\max}$ diagram. Very narrow polarization curves can be reproduced if we change the type of particles (prolate/oblate) and/or vary $a/b$.
  • Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are believed to be the first significant source of dust in the Universe. Such SNe are expected to be the main dust producers in young high-redshift Lyman $\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) given their young ages, providing an excellent testbed of SN dust formation models during the early stages of galaxy evolution. We focus on the dust enrichment of a specific, luminous LAE (Himiko, $z\simeq 6.6$) for which a stringent upper limit of $52.1~\mu$Jy ($3\sigma$) has recently been obtained from ALMA continuum observations at 1.2 mm. We predict its submillimetre dust emission using detailed models that follow SN dust enrichment and destruction and the equilibrium dust temperature, and obtain a plausible upper limit to the dust mass produced by a single SN: $m_\mathrm{d,SN} < 0.15$--0.45 M$_\odot$, depending on the adopted dust optical properties. These upper limits are smaller than the dust mass deduced for SN 1987A and that predicted by dust condensation theories, implying that dust produced in SNe are likely to be subject to reverse shock destruction before being injected into the interstellar medium. Finally, we provide a recipe for deriving $m_\mathrm{d,SN}$ from submillimetre observations of young, metal poor objects wherein condensation in SN ejecta is the dominant dust formation channel.
  • We compare theoretical dust yields for stars with mass 1 Msun < mstar < 8 Msun, and metallicities 0.001 < Z < 0.008 with observed dust production rates (DPR) by carbon- rich and oxygen-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (C-AGB and O-AGB) stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC). The measured DPR of C-AGB in the LMC are reproduced only if the mass loss from AGB stars is very efficient during the carbon-star stage. The same yields over-predict the observed DPR in the SMC, suggesting a stronger metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates during the carbon- star stage. DPR of O-AGB stars suggest that rapid silicate dust enrichment occurs due to efficient hot-bottom-burning if mstar > 3 Msun and Z > 0.001. When compared to the most recent observations, our models support a stellar origin for the existing dust mass, if no significant destruction in the ISM occurs, with a contribution from AGB stars of 70% in the LMC and 15% in the SMC.
  • Because of their brightness, gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are viable targets for investigating the dust content in their host galaxies. Simple intrinsic spectral shapes of GRB afterglows allow us to derive the dust extinction. Recently, the extinction data of GRB afterglows are compiled up to redshift $z=6.3$, in combination with hydrogen column densities and metallicities. This data set enables us to investigate the relation between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity out to high redshift for a wide metallicity range. By applying our evolution models of dust content in galaxies, we find that the dust-to-gas ratio derived from GRB afterglow extinction data are excessively high such that they can be explained with a fraction of gas-phase metals condensed into dust ($f_\mathrm{in}$) $\sim 1$, while theoretical calculations on dust formation in the wind of asymptotic giant branch stars and in the ejecta of Type II supernovae suggest a much more moderate condensation efficiency ($f_\mathrm{in}\sim 0.1$). Efficient dust growth in dense clouds has difficulty in explaining the excessive dust-to-gas ratio at metallicities $Z/\mathrm{Z}_\odot <\epsilon$, where $\epsilon$ is the star formation efficiency of the dense clouds. However, if $\epsilon$ is as small as 0.01, the dust-to-gas ratio at $Z\sim 10^{-2}$ Z$_\odot$ can be explained with $n_\mathrm{H}\gtrsim 10^6$ cm$^{-3}$. Therefore, a dense environment hosting dust growth is required to explain the large fraction of metals condensed into dust, but such clouds should have low star formation efficiencies to avoid rapid metal enrichment by stars.
  • The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when first planets are formed in galaxies. We investigate this problem by adopting a theoretical model developed for understanding the statistical properties of exoplanets. Our model is constructed as the combination of planet traps with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the dust density in disks or the metallicity ([Fe/H]). We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs) as well as the orbital radius ($<R_{rapid}>$) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets. The three characteristic exoplanetary populations are considered: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters densely populated around 1 AU, and low-mass planets such as super-Earths. We explore the behavior of the PFFs as well as $<R_{rapid}>$ for the three different populations as a function of metallicity ($-2 \leq$[Fe/H]$\leq -0.6$). We show that the total PFFs increase steadily with metallicity, which is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the entire range of the metallicity considered here, the population of the low-mass planets dominates over the Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H]-1. We find that the hot Jupiters form at lower metallcities than the exo-Jupiters. This arises from the radially inward transport of planetary cores by their host traps, which is more effective for lower metallicity disks due to the slower growth of the cores. The PFFs for the exo-Jupiters exceed those for the hot Jupiters around [Fe/H]-0.7. Finally, we show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H]-1.2, which is evaluated by comparing the values of $<R_{rapid}>$ between the hot Jupiters and the low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between them.