• This paper introduces matrix product state (MPS) decomposition as a new and systematic method to compress multidimensional data represented by higher-order tensors. It solves two major bottlenecks in tensor compression: computation and compression quality. Regardless of tensor order, MPS compresses tensors to matrices of moderate dimension which can be used for classification. Mainly based on a successive sequence of singular value decompositions (SVD), MPS is quite simple to implement and arrives at the global optimal matrix, bypassing local alternating optimization, which is not only computationally expensive but cannot yield the global solution. Benchmark results show that MPS can achieve better classification performance with favorable computation cost compared to other tensor compression methods.
  • This paper proposes a novel framework called concatenated image completion via tensor augmentation and completion (ICTAC), which recovers missing entries of color images with high accuracy. Typical images are second- or third-order tensors (2D/3D) depending if they are grayscale or color, hence tensor completion algorithms are ideal for their recovery. The proposed framework performs image completion by concatenating copies of a single image that has missing entries into a third-order tensor, applying a dimensionality augmentation technique to the tensor, utilizing a tensor completion algorithm for recovering its missing entries, and finally extracting the recovered image from the tensor. The solution relies on two key components that have been recently proposed to take advantage of the tensor train (TT) rank: A tensor augmentation tool called ket augmentation (KA) that represents a low-order tensor by a higher-order tensor, and the algorithm tensor completion by parallel matrix factorization via tensor train (TMac-TT), which has been demonstrated to outperform state-of-the-art tensor completion algorithms. Simulation results for color image recovery show the clear advantage of our framework against current state-of-the-art tensor completion algorithms.
  • This paper proposes a novel approach to tensor completion, which recovers missing entries of data represented by tensors. The approach is based on the tensor train (TT) rank, which is able to capture hidden information from tensors thanks to its definition from a well-balanced matricization scheme. Accordingly, new optimization formulations for tensor completion are proposed as well as two new algorithms for their solution. The first one called simple low-rank tensor completion via tensor train (SiLRTC-TT) is intimately related to minimizing a nuclear norm based on TT rank. The second one is from a multilinear matrix factorization model to approximate the TT rank of a tensor, and is called tensor completion by parallel matrix factorization via tensor train (TMac-TT). A tensor augmentation scheme of transforming a low-order tensor to higher-orders is also proposed to enhance the effectiveness of SiLRTC-TT and TMac-TT. Simulation results for color image and video recovery show the clear advantage of our method over all other methods.
  • This paper presents two-hop relay gain-scheduling control in a Wireless Sensor Network to estimate a static target prior characterized by Gaussian probability distribution. The target is observed by a network of linear sensors, whose observations are transmitted to a fusion center for carrying out final estimation via a amplify-and-forward relay node. We are concerned with the joint transmission power allocation for sensors and relay to optimize the minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimator, which is deployed at the fusion center. Particularly, such highly nonlinear optimization problems are solved by an iterative procedure of very low computational complexity. Simulations are provided to support the efficiency of our proposed power allocation.
  • This paper introduces matrix product state (MPS) decomposition as a computational tool for extracting features of multidimensional data represented by higher-order tensors. Regardless of tensor order, MPS extracts its relevant features to the so-called core tensor of maximum order three which can be used for classification. Mainly based on a successive sequence of singular value decompositions (SVD), MPS is quite simple to implement without any recursive procedure needed for optimizing local tensors. Thus, it leads to substantial computational savings compared to other tensor feature extraction methods such as higher-order orthogonal iteration (HOOI) underlying the Tucker decomposition (TD). Benchmark results show that MPS can reduce significantly the feature space of data while achieving better classification performance compared to HOOI.
  • This paper proposes a novel formulation of the tensor completion problem to impute missing entries of data represented by tensors. The formulation is introduced in terms of tensor train (TT) rank which can effectively capture global information of tensors thanks to its construction by a well-balanced matricization scheme. Two algorithms are proposed to solve the corresponding tensor completion problem. The first one called simple low-rank tensor completion via tensor train (SiLRTC-TT) is intimately related to minimizing the TT nuclear norm. The second one is based on a multilinear matrix factorization model to approximate the TT rank of the tensor and called tensor completion by parallel matrix factorization via tensor train (TMac-TT). These algorithms are applied to complete both synthetic and real world data tensors. Simulation results of synthetic data show that the proposed algorithms are efficient in estimating missing entries for tensors with either low Tucker rank or TT rank while Tucker-based algorithms are only comparable in the case of low Tucker rank tensors. When applied to recover color images represented by ninth-order tensors augmented from third-order ones, the proposed algorithms outperforms the Tucker-based algorithms.
  • The infinite Projected Entangled Pair States (iPEPS) algorithm [J. Jordan et al, PRL 101, 250602 (2008)] has become a useful tool in the calculation of ground state properties of 2d quantum lattice systems in the thermodynamic limit. Despite its many successful implementations, the method has some limitations in its present formulation which hinder its application to some highly-entangled systems. The purpose of this paper is to unravel some of these issues, in turn enhancing the stability and efficiency of iPEPS methods. For this, we first introduce the fast full update scheme, where effective environment and iPEPS tensors are both simultaneously updated (or evolved) throughout time. As we shall show, this implies two crucial advantages: (i) dramatic computational savings, and (ii) improved overall stability. Besides, we extend the application of the \emph{local gauge fixing}, successfully implemented for finite-size PEPS [M. Lubasch, J. Ignacio Cirac, M.-C. Ba\~{n}uls, PRB 90, 064425 (2014)], to the iPEPS algorithm. We see that the gauge fixing not only further improves the stability of the method, but also accelerates the convergence of the alternating least squares sweeping in the (either "full" or "fast full") tensor update scheme. The improvement in terms of computational cost and stability of the resulting "improved" iPEPS algorithm is benchmarked by studying the ground state properties of the quantum Heisenberg and transverse-field Ising models on an infinite square lattice.
  • We propose an environment recycling scheme to speed up a class of tensor network algorithms that produce an approximation to the ground state of a local Hamiltonian by simulating an evolution in imaginary time. Specifically, we consider the time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) algorithm applied to infinite systems in 1D and 2D, where the ground state is encoded, respectively, in a matrix product state (MPS) and in a projected entangled-pair state (PEPS). An important ingredient of the TEBD algorithm (and a main computational bottleneck, especially with PEPS in 2D) is the computation of the so-called environment, which is used to determine how to optimally truncate the bond indices of the tensor network so that their dimension is kept constant. In current algorithms, the environment is computed at each step of the imaginary time evolution, to account for the changes that the time evolution introduces in the many-body state represented by the tensor network. Our key insight is that close to convergence, most of the changes in the environment are due to a change in the choice of gauge in the bond indices of the tensor network, and not in the many-body state. Indeed, a consistent choice of gauge in the bond indices confirms that the environment is essentially the same over many time steps and can thus be re-used, leading to very substantial computational savings. We demonstrate the resulting approach in 1D and 2D by computing the ground state of the quantum Ising model in a transverse magnetic field.
  • We propose a formalism to study dynamical properties of a quantum many-body system in the thermodynamic limit by studying a finite system with infinite boundary conditions (IBC) where both finite size effects and boundary effects have been eliminated. For one-dimensional systems, infinite boundary conditions are obtained by attaching two boundary sites to a finite system, where each of these two sites effectively represents a semi-infinite extension of the system. One can then use standard finite-size matrix product state techniques to study a region of the system while avoiding many of the complications normally associated with finite-size calculations such as boundary Friedel oscillations. We illustrate the technique with an example of time evolution of a local perturbation applied to an infinite (translationally invariant) ground state, and use this to calculate the spectral function of the S=1 Heisenberg spin chain. This approach is more efficient and more accurate than conventional simulations based on finite-size matrix product state and density-matrix renormalization-group approaches.
  • We propose the use of a dynamical window to investigate the real-time evolution of quantum many-body systems in a one-dimensional lattice. In a recent paper [H. Phien et al, arxiv:????.????], we introduced infinite boundary conditions (IBC) in order to investigate real-time evolution of an infinite system under a local perturbation. This was accomplished by restricting the update of the tensors in the matrix product state to a finite window, with left and right boundaries held at fixed positions. Here we consider instead the use of a dynamical window, namely a window where the positions of left and right boundaries are allowed to change in time. In this way, all simulation efforts can be devoted to the space-time region of interest, which leads to a remarkable reduction in computational costs. For illustrative purposes, we consider two applications in the context of the spin-1 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model in an infinite spin chain: one is an expanding window, with boundaries that are adjusted to capture the expansion in time of a local perturbation of the system; the other is a moving window of fixed size, where the position of the window follows the front of a propagating wave.