• Despite the enormous theoretical and experimental progress made so far in quantum key distribution (QKD), the security of most existing QKD implementations is not rigorously established yet. A critical obstacle is that almost all existing security proofs make ideal assumptions on the QKD devices. Problematically, such assumptions are hard to satisfy in the experiments, and therefore it is not obvious how to apply such security proofs to practical QKD systems. Fortunately, any imperfections and security-loopholes in the measurement devices can be perfectly closed by measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD), and thus we only need to consider how to secure the source devices. Among imperfections in the source devices, correlations between the sending pulses are one of the principal problems. In this paper, we consider a setting-choice-independent correlation (SCIC) framework in which the sending pulses can present arbitrary correlations but they are independent of the previous setting choices such as the bit, the basis and the intensity settings. Within the framework of SCIC, we consider the dominant fluctuations of the sending states, such as the relative phases and the intensities, and provide a self-contained information theoretic security proof for the loss-tolerant QKD protocol in the finite-key regime. We demonstrate the feasibility of secure quantum communication within a reasonable number of pulses sent, and thus we are convinced that our work constitutes a crucial step toward guaranteeing implementation security of QKD.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • Free-space Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties to share a random key with unconditional security, between ground stations, between mobile platforms, and even in satellite-ground quantum communications. Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in transmittance, which further affect the quantum bit error rate (QBER) and the secure key rate. Previous post-selection methods to combat atmospheric turbulence require a threshold value determined after all quantum transmission. In contrast, here we propose a new method where we pre-determine the optimal threshold value even before quantum transmission. Therefore, the receiver can discard useless data immediately, thus greatly reducing data storage requirement and computing resource. Furthermore, our method can be applied to a variety of protocols, including, for example, not only single-photon BB84, but also asymptotic and finite-size decoy-state BB84, which can greatly increase its practicality.
  • Several quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols employ iterative sifting. After each quantum transmission round, Alice and Bob disclose part of their setting information (including their basis choices) for the detected signals. The quantum phase of the protocol then ends when the numbers of detected signals per basis exceed certain pre-agreed threshold values. Recently, however, Pfister et al. [New J. Phys. 18 053001 (2016)] showed that iterative sifting makes QKD insecure, especially in the finite key regime, if the parameter estimation for privacy amplification uses the random sampling theory. This implies that a number of existing finite key security proofs could be flawed and cannot guarantee security. Here, we solve this serious problem by showing that the use of Azuma's inequality for parameter estimation makes QKD with iterative sifting secure again. This means that the existing protocols whose security proof employs this inequality remain secure even if they employ iterative sifting. Also, our results highlight a fundamental difference between the random sampling theorem and Azuma's inequality in proving security.
  • In this paper, we study the Universal Blind Quantum Computing (UBQC) protocol, which allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote quantum server and the Remote Blind qubit state Preparation (RBSP) protocol which allows the client to prepare single qubits on the server's location with week coherent pulses. This RBSP protocol is inefficient for small $ T $, because the required number of pulses for generating one single qubit scales as $ \mbox{O}(1/T^4) $, where $ T $ is the transmittance of the quantum channe between the client and the server. Our contribution in this paper is a modified RBSP protocol with decoy states. This new protocol allows us to generate $ S $ single qubits simultaneously in a single instance. With our new rotocol, we are able to reduce the number of weak coherent pulses required for generating one single qubit from $ \mbox{O}(1/T^4) $ to nearly $ \mbox{O}(1/T) $, significantly increasing the efficiency. For a 100 km standard telecom fiber of loss 0.2 dB/km, our method gives a six orders of magnitude improvement in the speed, which is very significant.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises unconditional security in data communication and is currently being deployed in commercial applications. Nonetheless, before QKD can be widely adopted, it faces a number of important challenges such as secret key rate, distance, size, cost and practical security. Here, we survey those key challenges and the approaches that are currently being taken to address them.
  • We present a silicon optical transmitter for polarization-encoded quantum key distribution (QKD). The chip was fabricated in a standard silicon photonic foundry process and integrated a pulse generator, intensity modulator, variable optical attenuator, and polarization modulator in a 1.3 mm $\times$ 3 mm die area. The devices in the photonic circuit meet the requirements for QKD. The transmitter was used in a proof-of-concept demonstration of the BB84 QKD protocol over a 5 km long fiber link.
  • The quantum internet holds promise for performing quantum communication, such as quantum teleportation and quantum key distribution (QKD), freely between any parties all over the globe. Such a future quantum network, depending on the communication distance of the requesting parties, necessitates to invoke several classes of optical quantum communication such as point-to-point communication protocols, intercity QKD protocols and quantum repeater protocols. Recently, Takeoka, Guha and Wilde (TGW) have presented a fundamental rate-loss tradeoff on quantum communication capacity and secret key agreement capacity of any lossy channel assisted by unlimited forward and backward classical communication [Nat. Commun. 5, 5235 (2014)]. However, this bound is applicable only to the simplest class of quantum communication, i.e., the point-to-point communication protocols, and it has thus remained open to grasp the potential of a `worldwide' quantum network. Here we generalize the TGW bound to be applicable to any type of two-party quantum communication over the quantum internet, including other indispensable but much more intricate classes of quantum communication, intercity QKD protocols and quantum repeater protocols. We also show that there is essentially no scaling gap between our bound and the quantum communication efficiencies of known protocols. Therefore, our result, corresponding to a fundamental and practical limitation for the quantum internet, will contribute to design an efficient quantum internet in the future.
  • Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks, is the most promising solution to the security issues in practical quantum key distribution systems. Though several experimental demonstrations of MDI QKD have been reported, they all make one crucial but not yet verified assumption, that is there are no flaws in state preparation. Such an assumption is unrealistic and security loopholes remain in the source. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first MDI-QKD experiment with state preparation flaws taken into consideration. By applying a novel security proof by Tamaki \textit{et al} (Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014)), we distribute secure keys over fiber links up to 40 km with imperfect sources, which would not have been possible under previous security proofs. By closing loopholes in both the sources and the detectors, our work shows the feasibility of secure QKD with practical imperfect devices.
  • We propose a free-space reconfigurable quantum key distribution (QKD) network to secure communication among mobile users. Depends on the trustworthiness of the network relay, the users can implement either the highly secure measurement-device-independent QKD, or the highly efficient decoy state BB84 QKD. Based on the same quantum infrastructure, we also propose a loss tolerant quantum position verification scheme, which could allow the QKD users to initiate the QKD process without relying on pre-shared key.
  • The security of source has become an increasingly important issue in quantum cryptography. Based on the framework of measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD), the source becomes the only region exploitable by a potential eavesdropper (Eve). Phase randomization is a cornerstone assumption in most discrete-variable (DV-) quantum communication protocols (e.g., QKD, quantum coin tossing, weak coherent state blind quantum computing, and so on), and the violation of such an assumption is thus fatal to the security of those protocols. In this paper, we show a simple quantum hacking strategy, with commercial and homemade pulsed lasers, by Eve that allows her to actively tamper with the source and violate such an assumption, without leaving a trace afterwards. Furthermore, our attack may also be valid for continuous-variable (CV-) QKD, which is another main class of QKD protocol, since, excepting the phase random assumption, other parameters (e.g., intensity) could also be changed, which directly determine the security of CV-QKD.
  • We demonstrate that, with a fair comparison, the secret key rate of discrete-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (DV-MDI-QKD) with high-efficiency single-photon detectors and good system alignment is typically rather high and thus highly suitable for not only long distance communication but also metropolitan networks. The previous reservation on the key rate and suitability of DV-MDI-QKD for metropolitan networks expressed by Pirandola et al. [Nature Photon. 9, 397 (2015)] was based on an unfair comparison with low-efficiency detectors and high quantum bit error rate, and is, in our opinion, unjustified.
  • Secure communication plays a crucial role in the Internet Age. Quantum mechanics may revolutionise cryptography as we know it today. In this Review Article, we introduce the motivation and the current state of the art of research in quantum cryptography. In particular, we discuss the present security model together with its assumptions, strengths and weaknesses. After a brief introduction to recent experimental progress and challenges, we survey the latest developments in quantum hacking and counter-measures against it.
  • Quantum key distribution promises unconditionally secure communications. However, as practical devices tend to deviate from their specifications, the security of some practical systems is no longer valid. In particular, an adversary can exploit imperfect detectors to learn a large part of the secret key, even though the security proof claims otherwise. Recently, a practical approach---measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution---has been proposed to solve this problem. However, so far its security has only been fully proven under the assumption that the legitimate users of the system have unlimited resources. Here we fill this gap and provide a rigorous security proof against general attacks in the finite-key regime. This is obtained by applying large deviation theory, specifically the Chernoff bound, to perform parameter estimation. For the first time we demonstrate the feasibility of long-distance implementations of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution within a reasonable time-frame of signal transmission.
  • Coherent state photon sources are widely used in quantum information processing. In many applications, such as quantum key distribution (QKD), a coherent state is functioned as a mixture of Fock states by assuming its phase is continuously randomized. In practice, such a crucial assumption is often not satisfied and, therefore, the security of existing QKD experiments is not guaranteed. To bridge this gap, we provide a rigorous security proof of QKD with discrete-phase-randomized coherent state sources. Our results show that the performance of the discrete-phase randomization case is close to its continuous counterpart with only a small number (say, 10) of discrete phases. Comparing to the conventional continuous phase randomization case, where an infinite amount of random bits are required, our result shows that only a small amount (say, 4 bits) of randomness is needed.
  • Decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) is a standard technique in current quantum cryptographic implementations. Unfortunately, existing experiments have two important drawbacks: the state preparation is assumed to be perfect without errors and the employed security proofs do not fully consider the finite-key effects for general attacks. These two drawbacks mean that existing experiments are not guaranteed to be secure in practice. Here, we perform an experiment that for the first time shows secure QKD with imperfect state preparations over long distances and achieves rigorous finite-key security bounds for decoy-state QKD against coherent attacks in the universally composable framework. We quantify the source flaws experimentally and demonstrate a QKD implementation that is tolerant to channel loss despite the source flaws. Our implementation considers more real-world problems than most previous experiments and our theory can be applied to general QKD systems. These features constitute a step towards secure QKD with imperfect devices.
  • Quantum communication holds the promise of creating disruptive technologies that will play an essential role in future communication networks. For example, the study of quantum communication complexity has shown that quantum communication allows exponential reductions in the information that must be transmitted to solve distributed computational tasks. Recently, protocols that realize this advantage using optical implementations have been proposed. Here we report a proof of concept experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the best known classical protocol. Our implementation is based on a modified version of a commercial quantum key distribution system using off-the-shelf optical components over telecom wavelengths, and is practical for messages as large as 100 Mbits, even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results provide a first step in the development of experimental quantum communication complexity.
  • In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. It can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue towards secure QKD realisations. Here, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths and weaknesses.
  • Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) has been demonstrated in both laboratories and field-tests using attenuated lasers combined with the decoy-state technique. Although researchers have studied various decoy-state MDI-QKD protocols with two or three decoy states, a clear comparison between these protocols is still missing. This invokes the question of how many types of decoy states are needed for practical MDI-QKD. Moreover, the system parameters to implement decoy-state MDI-QKD are only partially optimized in all previous works, which casts doubt on the actual performance of former demonstrations. Here, we present analytical and numerical decoy-state methods with one, two and three decoy states. We provide a clear comparison among these methods and find that two decoy states already enable a near optimal estimation and more decoy states cannot improve the key rate much in either asymptotic or finite-data settings. Furthermore, we perform a full optimization of system parameters and show that full optimization can significantly improve the key rate in the finite-data setting. By simulating a real experiment, we find that full optimization can increase the key rate by more than one order of magnitude compared to non-optimization. A local search method to optimize efficiently the system parameters is proposed. This method can be four orders of magnitude faster than a trivial exhaustive search to achieve a similar optimal key rate. We expect that this local search method could be valuable for general fields in physics.
  • In principle, quantum key distribution (QKD) offers unconditional security based on the laws of physics. In practice, flaws in the state preparation undermine the security of QKD systems, as standard theoretical approaches to deal with state preparation flaws are not loss-tolerant. An eavesdropper can enhance and exploit such imperfections through quantum channel loss, thus dramatically lowering the key generation rate. Crucially, the security analyses of most existing QKD experiments are rather unrealistic as they typically neglect this effect. Here, we propose a novel and general approach that makes QKD loss-tolerant to state preparation flaws. Importantly, it suggests that the state preparation process in QKD can be significantly less precise than initially thought. Our method can widely apply to other quantum cryptographic protocols.
  • A novel protocol - measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) - removes all attacks from the detection system, the most vulnerable part in QKD implementations. In this paper, we present an analysis for practical aspects of MDI-QKD. To evaluate its performance, we study various error sources by developing a general system model. We find that MDI-QKD is highly practical and thus can be easily implemented with standard optical devices. Moreover, we present a simple analytical method with only two (general) decoy states for the finite decoy-state analysis. This method can be used directly by experimentalists to demonstrate MDI-QKD. By combining the system model with the finite decoy-state method, we present a general framework for the optimal choice of the intensities of the signal and decoy states. Furthermore, we consider a common situation, namely asymmetric MDI-QKD, in which the two quantum channels have different transmittances. We investigate its properties and discuss how to optimize its performance. Our work is of interest not only to experiments demonstrating MDI-QKD but also to other non-QKD experiments involving quantum interference.
  • Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories at the repeater nodes. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. As an example of the realization of this concept, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such an all photonic quantum repeater, the communication efficiency still scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route toward quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.
  • We present a practical method that can make quantum key distribution (QKD), for the first time, both ultra-long-distance and immune to all attacks in the detection system. This method is an important extension of the measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD) - MDI-QKD with entangled photon sources in the middle. By proposing a general model and simulating an entanglement based QKD experiment, we find that MDI-QKD with one entangled photon source in the middle can practically tolerate 77 dB combined loss (367km standard telecom fiber) in the asymptotic limit, and it can still tolerate 60 dB combined loss (286km standard telecom fiber) in the finite-key case with state-of-the-art detectors. Our general model can also be applied to other non-QKD experiments involving entangled photon sources and Bell state measurements.
  • We investigate limitations imposed by sequential attacks on the performance of differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution protocols that use pulsed coherent light. In particular, we analyze two sequential attacks based on unambiguous state discrimination and minimum error discrimination, respectively, of the signal states emitted by the source. Sequential attacks represent a special type of intercept-resend attacks and, therefore, they do not allow the distribution of a secret key.
  • We demonstrate the first implementation of polarization encoding measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks. Active phase randomization of each individual pulse is implemented to protect against attacks on imperfect sources. By optimizing the parameters in the decoy state protocol, we show that it is feasible to implement polarization encoding MDI-QKD over large optical fiber distances. A 1600-bit secure key is generated between two parties separated by 10 km of telecom fibers. Our work suggests the possibility of building a MDI-QKD network, in which complicated and expensive detection system is placed in a central node and users connected to it can perform confidential communication by preparing polarization qubits with compact and low-cost equipment. Since MDI-QKD is highly compatible with the quantum network, our work brings the realization of quantum internet one step closer.