• Model reduction of biochemical networks relies on the knowledge of slow and fast variables. We provide a geometric method, based on the Newton polytope, to identify slow variables of a biochemical network with polynomial rate functions. The gist of the method is the notion of tropical equilibration that provides approximate descriptions of slow invariant manifolds. Compared to extant numerical algorithms such as the intrinsic low dimensional manifold method, our approach is symbolic and utilizes orders of magnitude instead of precise values of the model parameters. Application of this method to a large collection of biochemical network models supports the idea that the number of dynamical variables in minimal models of cell physiology can be small, in spite of the large number of molecular regulatory actors.
  • We discuss a novel analysis method for reaction network systems with polynomial or rational rate functions. This method is based on computing tropical equilibrations defined by the equality of at least two dominant monomials of opposite signs in the differential equations of each dynamic variable. In algebraic geometry, the tropical equilibration problem is tantamount to finding tropical prevarieties, that are finite intersections of tropical hypersurfaces. Tropical equilibrations with the same set of dominant monomials define a branch or equivalence class. Minimal branches are particularly interesting as they describe the simplest states of the reaction network. We provide a method to compute the number of minimal branches and to find representative tropical equilibrations for each branch.
  • Background: Predictive, stable and interpretable gene signatures are generally seen as an important step towards a better personalized medicine. During the last decade various methods have been proposed for that purpose. However, one important obstacle for making gene signatures a standard tool in clinics is the typical low reproducibility of these signatures combined with the difficulty to achieve a clear biological interpretation. For that purpose in the last years there has been a growing interest in approaches that try to integrate information from molecular interaction networks. Results: We propose a novel algorithm, called FrSVM, which integrates protein-protein interaction network information into gene selection for prognostic biomarker discovery. Our method is a simple filter based approach, which focuses on central genes with large differences in their expression. Compared to several other competing methods our algorithm reveals a significantly better prediction performance and higher signature stability. More- over, obtained gene lists are highly enriched with known disease genes and drug targets. We extendd our approach further by integrating information on candidate disease genes and targets of disease associated Transcript Factors (TFs).