• We determine the escape velocity from the Milky Way (MW) at a range of Galactocentric radii in the context of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). Due to its non-linear nature, escape is possible if the MW is considered embedded in a constant external gravitational field (EF) from distant objects. We model this situation using a fully self-consistent method based on a direct solution of the governing equations out to several thousand disk scale lengths. We try out a range of EF strengths and mass models for the MW in an attempt to match the escape velocity measurements of Williams et al. (2017). A reasonable match is found if the EF on the MW is ${\sim 0.03 a_{_0}}$, towards the higher end of the range considered. Our models include a hot gas corona surrounding the MW, but our results suggest that this should have a very low mass of ${\sim 2 \times 10^{10} M_\odot}$ to avoid pushing the escape velocity too high. Our analysis favours a slightly lower baryonic disk mass than the ${\sim 7 \times 10^{10} M_\odot}$ required to explain its rotation curve in MOND. However, given the uncertainties, MOND is consistent with both the locally measured amplitude of the MW rotation curve and its escape velocity over Galactocentric distances of 8$-$50 kpc.
  • The standard $\Lambda$CDM paradigm seems to describe cosmology and large scale structure formation very well. However, a number of puzzling observations remain on galactic scales. An example is the anisotropic distribution of satellite galaxies in the Local Group. This has led to suggestions that a modified gravity theory might provide a better explanation than Newtonian gravity supplemented by dark matter. One of the leading modified gravity theories is Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). For an isolated point mass, it boosts gravity by an acceleration-dependent factor of $\nu$. Recently, a much more computer-friendly quasi-linear formulation of MOND (QUMOND) has become available. We investigate analytically the solution for a point mass embedded in a constant external field of $\mathbf{g}_{ext}$. We find that the potential is $\Phi = - ~ \frac{GM \nu_{ext}}{r}\left(1 + \frac{K_0}{2} \sin^2 \theta \right)$, where $r$ is distance from the mass $M$ which is in an external field that `saturates' the $\nu$ function at the value $\nu_{ext}$, leading to a fixed value of $K_0 \equiv \frac{\partial Ln ~ \nu}{\partial Ln ~ g_{ext}}$. In a very weak gravitational field $\left(\left| \mathbf{g}_{ext} \right| \ll a_0 \right)$, $K_0 = -\frac{1}{2}$. The angle $\theta$ is that between the external field direction and the direction towards the mass. Our results are quite close to the more traditional aquadratic Lagrangian (AQUAL) formulation of MOND. We apply both theories to a simple model of the Sagittarius tidal stream. We find that they give very similar results, with the tidal stream seeming to spread slightly further in AQUAL.
  • We attempt to understand the planes of satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way (MW) and M31 in the context of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), which implies a close MW-M31 flyby occurred ${\approx 8}$ Gyr ago. Using the timing argument, we obtain MW-M31 trajectories consistent with cosmological initial conditions and present observations. We adjust the present M31 proper motion within its uncertainty in order to simulate a range of orbital geometries and closest approach distances. Treating the MW and M31 as point masses, we follow the trajectories of surrounding test particle disks, thereby mapping out the tidal debris distribution. Around each galaxy, the resulting tidal debris tends to cluster around a particular orbital pole. We find some models in which these preferred spin vectors align fairly well with those of the corresponding observed satellite planes. The radial distributions of material in the simulated satellite planes are similar to what we observe. Around the MW, our best-fitting model yields a significant fraction (0.22) of counter-rotating material, perhaps explaining why Sculptor counter-rotates within the MW satellite plane. In contrast, our model yields no counter-rotating material around M31. This is testable with proper motions of M31 satellites. In our best model, the MW disk is thickened by the flyby 7.65 Gyr ago to a root mean square height of 0.75 kpc. This is similar to the observed age and thickness of the Galactic thick disk. Thus, the MW thick disk may have formed together with the MW and M31 satellite planes during a past MW-M31 flyby.
  • We recently showed that several Local Group (LG) galaxies have much higher radial velocities (RVs) than predicted by a 3D dynamical model of the standard cosmological paradigm. Here, we show that 6 of these 7 galaxies define a thin plane with root mean square thickness of only 101 kpc despite a widest extent of nearly 3 Mpc, much larger than the conventional virial radius of the Milky Way (MW) or M31. This plane passes within ${\sim 70}$ kpc of the MW-M31 barycentre and is oriented so the MW-M31 line is inclined by $16^\circ$ to it. We develop a toy model to constrain the scenario whereby a past MW-M31 flyby in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) forms tidal dwarf galaxies that settle into the recently discovered planes of satellites around the MW and M31. The scenario is viable only for a particular MW-M31 orbital plane. This roughly coincides with the plane of LG dwarfs with anomalously high RVs. Using a restricted $N$-body simulation of the LG in MOND, we show how the once fast-moving MW and M31 gravitationally slingshot test particles outwards at high speeds. The most distant such particles preferentially lie within the MW-M31 orbital plane, probably because the particles ending up with the highest RVs are those flung out almost parallel to the motion of the perturber. This suggests a dynamical reason for our finding of a similar trend in the real LG, something not easily explained as a chance alignment of galaxies with an isotropic or mildly flattened distribution (probability $= {0.0015}$).
  • It has recently been proposed, by assuming that dark matter is a superfluid, that MOND-like effects can be achieved on small scales whilst preserving the success of $\Lambda$CDM on large scales. Here we aim to provide the first set of spherical models of galaxy clusters in the context of superfluid dark matter. We first outline the theoretical structure of the superfluid core and the surrounding "normal phase" dark halo of quasi-particles in thermal equlibrium. The latter should encompass the largest part of galaxy clusters. Here, we set the SfDM transition at the radius where the density and pressure of the superfluid and normal phase coincides, neglecting the effect of phonons in the suprefluid core. We then apply the theory to a sample of galaxy clusters, and directly compare the SfDM predicted mass profiles to data. We find that the superfluid formulation can reproduce the X-ray dynamical mass profile of clusters. The SfDM fits however display slight under-predictions of the gravity in the central regions which might be partly related to our neglecting of the effect of phonons in these regions. We conclude that this superfluid formulation is successful in describing galaxy clusters, but further work will be needed to determine whether the parameter choice is consistent with galaxies. Our model could be made more realistic by exploring non-sphericity and the SfDM transition condition we impose.
  • Adopting Schwarzschild's orbit-superposition technique, we construct a series of self-consistent galaxy models, embedded in the external field of galaxy clusters in the framework of Milgrom's MOdified Newtonian Dynamics. These models represent relatively massive ellipticals with a Hernquist radial profile at various distances from the cluster centre. Using $N$-body simulations, we perform a first analysis of these models and their evolution. We find that self-gravitating axisymmetric density models, even under a weak external field, lose their symmetry by instability and generally evolve to triaxial configurations. A kinematic analysis suggests that the instability originates from both box and non-classified orbits with low angular momentum. We also consider a self-consistent isolated system which is then placed in a strong external field and allowed to evolve freely. This model, just as the corresponding equilibrium model in the same external field, eventually settles to a triaxial equilibrium as well, but has a higher velocity radial anisotropy and is rounder. The presence of an external field in MOND universe generically predicts some lopsidedness of galaxy shapes.
  • We model the cluster A1689 in two modified MOND frameworks (EMOND and what we call generalised MOND or GMOND) with the aim of determining whether it is possible to explain the inferred acceleration profile, from gravitational lensing, without the aid of dark matter. We also compare our result to predictions from MOG/STVG and Emergent Gravity. By using a baryonic mass model, we determine the total gravitational acceleration predicted by the modified gravitational equations and compare the result to NFW profiles of dark matter studies on A1689 from the literature. Theory parameters are inferred empirically, with the aid of previous work. We are able to reproduce the desired acceleration profile of A1689 for GMOND, EMOND and MOG, but not Emergent Gravity. There is much more work which needs to be conducted with regards to understanding how the GMOND parameters behave in different environments. Furthermore, we show that the exact baryonic profile becomes very important when undertaking modified gravity modelling rather than {\Lambda}CDM.
  • A sample of Coma cluster ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) are modelled in the context of Extended Modified Newtonian Dynamics (EMOND) with the aim to explain the large dark matter-like effect observed in these cluster galaxies. We first build a model of the Coma cluster in the context of EMOND using gas and galaxy mass profiles from the literature. Then assuming the dynamical mass of the UDGs satisfies the fundamental manifold of other ellipticals, and that the UDG stellar mass-to-light matches their colour, we can verify the EMOND formulation by comparing two predictions of the baryonic mass of UDGs. We find that EMOND can explain the UDG mass, within the expected modelling errors, if they lie on the fundamental manifold of ellipsoids, however, given that measurements show one UDG lying off the fundamental manifold, observations of more UDGs are needed to confirm this assumption.
  • We attempt to fit the observed radial velocities (RVs) of ${\,{\sim}\,}30$ Local Group (LG) galaxies using a 3D dynamical model of it and its immediate environment within the context of the standard cosmological paradigm, $\Lambda$CDM. This extends and confirms the basic results of our previous axisymmetric investigation of the LG (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We find that there remains a tendency for observed RVs to exceed those predicted by our best-fitting model. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our 2D model, with a root mean square value of ${\,{\sim}\,}50$ km/s. Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy problem. Nonetheless, the 2D and 3D results differ in several other ways such as which galaxies' RVs are most problematic and the preferred values of parameters common to both models. The anomalously high RVs of several LG dwarfs may be better explained if the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) were once moving much faster than in our models. This would allow LG dwarfs to gain very high RVs via gravitational slingshot encounters with a massive fast-moving galaxy. Such a scenario is possible in some modified gravity theories, especially those which require the MW and M31 to have previously undergone a close flyby. In a $\Lambda$CDM context, however, this scenario is not feasible as the resulting dynamical friction would cause a rapid merger.
  • Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is a gravitational framework designed to explain the astronomical observations in the Universe without the inclusion of particle dark matter. Modified Newtonian Dynamics, in its current form, cannot explain the missing mass in galaxy clusters without the inclusion of some extra mass, be it in the form of neutrinos or non-luminous baryonic matter. We investigate whether the MOND framework can be generalized to account for the missing mass in galaxy clusters by boosting gravity in high gravitational potential regions. We examine and review Extended MOND (EMOND), which was designed to increase the MOND scale acceleration in high potential regions, thereby boosting the gravity in clusters. We seek to investigate galaxy cluster mass profiles in the context of MOND with the primary aim at explaining the missing mass problem fully without the need for dark matter. Using the assumption that the clusters are in hydrostatic equilibrium, we can compute the dynamical mass of each cluster and compare the result to the predicted mass of the EMOND formalism. We find that EMOND has some success in fitting some clusters, but overall has issues when trying to explain the mass deficit fully. We also investigate an empirical relation to solve the cluster problem, which is found by analysing the cluster data and is based on the MOND paradigm. We discuss the limitations in the text.
  • Counter to intuition, the images of an extended galaxy lensed by a moving galaxy cluster should have slightly different spectra in any metric gravity theory. This is mainly for two reasons. One relies on the gravitational potential of a moving lens being time-dependent (the $\text{Moving}$ $\text{Cluster}$ $\text{Effect}$, $\text{MCE}$). The other is due to uneven magnification across the extended, rotating source (the $\text{Differential}$ $\text{Magnification}$ $\text{Effect}$, $\text{DME}$). The time delay between the images can also cause their redshifts to differ because of cosmological expansion. This Differential Expansion Effect is likely to be small. Using a simple model, we derive these effects from first principles. One application would be to the Bullet Cluster, whose large tangential velocity may be inconsistent with the $\Lambda CDM$ paradigm. This velocity can be estimated with complicated hydrodynamic models. Uncertainties with such models can be avoided using the MCE. We argue that the MCE should be observable with ALMA. However, such measurements can be corrupted by the DME if typical spiral galaxies are used as sources. Fortunately, we find that if detailed spectral line profiles were available, then the DME and MCE could be distinguished. It might also be feasible to calculate how much the DME should affect the mean redshift of each image. Resolved observations of the source would be required to do this accurately. The DME is of order the source angular size divided by the Einstein radius times the redshift variation across the source. Thus, it mostly affects nearly edge-on spiral galaxies in certain orientations. This suggests that observers should reduce the DME by careful choice of target, a possibility we discuss in some detail.
  • The positions and velocities of galaxies in the Local Group (LG) measure the gravitational field within it. This is mostly due to the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31). We constrain their masses using distance and radial velocity (RV) measurements of 32 LG galaxies. To do this, we follow the trajectories of many simulated particles starting on a pure Hubble flow at redshift 9. For each observed galaxy, we obtain a trajectory which today is at the same position. Its final velocity is the model prediction for the velocity of that galaxy. Unlike previous simulations based on spherical symmetry, ours are axisymmetric and include gravity from Centaurus A. We find the total LG mass is ${4.33^{+0.37}_{-0.32}\times{10}^{12}M_\odot}$, with $0.14 \pm 0.07$ of this being in the MW. We approximately account for IC 342, M81, the Great Attractor and the Large Magellanic Cloud. No plausible set of initial conditions yields a good match to the RVs of our sample of LG galaxies. Observed RVs systematically exceed those predicted by the best-fitting $\Lambda$CDM model, with a typical disagreement of ${45.1^{+7.0}_{-5.7}}$ km/s and a maximum of ${110 \pm 13}$ km/s for DDO 99. Interactions between LG dwarf galaxies can't easily explain this. One possibility is a past close flyby of the MW and M31. This arises in some modified gravity theories but not in $\Lambda$CDM. Gravitational slingshot encounters of material in the LG with either of these massive fast-moving galaxies could plausibly explain why some non-satellite LG galaxies are moving away from us even faster than a pure Hubble flow.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • This is a brief rebuttal to arXiv:1502.03821, which claims to provide the first observational proof of dark matter interior to the solar circle. We point out that this result is not new, and can be traced back at least a quarter century.
  • Following earlier authors, we re-examine constraints on the radial velocity anisotropy of generic stellar systems using arguments for phase space density positivity, stability, and separability. It is known that although the majority of commonly used systems have an maximum anisotropy of less than half of the logarithmic density slope \emph{i.e.} $\beta < \gamma/2$, there are exceptions for separable models with large central anisotropy. Here we present a new exceptional case with above-threshold anisotropy locally but with an isotropic center nevertheless. These models are non-separable and we maintain positivity. Our analysis suggests that regions of above-threshold anisotropy are more related to regions of possible secular instability, which might be observed in self-consistent galaxies in a short-lived phase. s an equilibrium solution for a collisionless system.
  • We study the evolution of the phase-space of collisionless N-body systems under repeated stirrings or perturbations, which has been shown to lead to a convergence towards a limited group of end states. This so-called attractor was previously shown to be independent of the initial system and environmental conditions. However the fundamental reason for its appearance is still unclear. It has been suggested that the origin of the attractor may be either radial infall (RI), the radial orbit instability (ROI), or energy exchange which, for instance, happens during violent relaxation. Here we examine the effects of a set of controlled perturbations, referred to as `kicks', which act in addition to the standard collisionless dynamics by allowing pre-specified instantaneous perturbations in phase-space. We first demonstrate that the attractor persists in the absence of RI and ROI by forcing the system to expand. We then consider radial velocity kicks in a rigid potential and isotropic velocity kicks, since there are no energy exchanges in these two recipes of kicks. We find that these kicks do not lead to the attractor, indicating that the energy exchange in a dynamic potential is indeed the physical mechanism responsible for the attractor.
  • There is growing interest in testing alternative gravity theories using the subtle gravitational redshifts in clusters of galaxies. However, current models all neglect a transverse Doppler redshift of similar magnitude, and some models are not self-consistent. An equilibrium model would fix the gravitational and transverse Doppler velocity shifts to be about 6sigma^2/c and 3sigma^2/2c in order to fit the observed velocity dispersion sigma self-consistently. This result comes from the Virial Theorem for a spherical isotropic cluster, and is insensitive to the theory of gravity. A gravitational redshift signal also does not directly distinguish between the Einsteinian and f(R) gravity theories, because each theory requires different dark halo mass function to keep the clusters in equilibrium. When this constraint is imposed, the gravitational redshift has no sensitivity to theory. Indeed our N-body simulations show that the halo mass function differs in f(R), and that the transverse Doppler effect is stronger than analytically predicted due to non-equilibrium.
  • The Local Group timing has been one of the first historical probes of the missing mass problem. Whilst modern cosmological probes indicate that pure baryonic dynamics is not sufficient on the largest scales, nearby galaxies and small galaxy groups persistently obey Milgrom's MOND law, which implies that dynamics at small scales is possibly entirely predicted by the baryons. Here, we investigate the Local Group timing in this context of Milgromian dynamics. Making use of the latest measured proper motions and radial velocities for Andromeda and the Magellanic clouds, we integrate backwards their orbits by making use of the Milgromian two-body equation of motion. We find that, with the currently measured proper motions and radial velocity of M31, MOND would imply that the Milky Way and M31 first moved apart via Hubble expansion after birth, but then necessarily got attracted again by the Milgromian gravitational attraction, and had a past fly-by encounter before coming to their present positions. This encounter would most probably have happened 7 to 11 Gyr ago (0.8<z<3). The absence of a dark matter halo and its associated dynamical friction is necessary for such a close encounter not to trigger a merger. Observational arguments which could exclude or favour such a past encounter would thus be very important in view of falsifying or vindicating Milgromian dynamics on the scale of the Local Group. Interestingly, the closest approach of the encounter is small enough (<55 kpc) to have severe consequences on the disk dynamics, including perhaps thick disk formation, and on the satellite systems of both galaxies. The ages of the satellite galaxies and of the young halo globular clusters, all of which form the vast polar structure around the Milky Way, are consistent with these objects having been born in this encounter.
  • We use Schwarzschild's orbit-superposition technique to construct self-consistent models of the Galactic bar. Using $\chi^2$ minimisation, we find that the best-fit Galactic bar model has a pattern speed $\Omega_{\rm p}=60 \rm{km s^{-1} kpc^{-1}}$, disk mass $\rm{M_{\rm d}=1.0\times10^{11}M_{\odot}}$ and bar angle $\theta_{\rm bar}=20^{\circ}$ for an adopted bar mass $\rm{M_{\rm bar}=2\times10^{10}M_{\odot}}$. The model can reproduce not only the three-dimensional and projected density distributions but also velocity and velocity dispersion data from the BRAVA survey. We also predict the proper motions in the range $l=[-12^{\circ},12^{\circ}]$, $b=[-10^{\circ},10^{\circ}]$, which appear to be higher than observations in the longitudinal direction. The model is stable within a timescale of 0.5 Gyr, but appears to deviate from steady-state on longer timescales. Our model can be further tested by future observations such as those from GAIA.
  • A remarkably tight relation is observed between the Newtonian gravity sourced by the baryons and the actual gravity in galaxies of all sizes. This can be interpreted as the effect of a single effective force law depending on acceleration. This is however not the case in larger systems with much deeper potential wells, such as galaxy clusters. Here we explore the possibility of an effective force law reproducing mass discrepancies in all extragalactic systems when depending on both acceleration and the depth of the potential well. We exhibit, at least at a phenomenological level, one such possible construction in the classical gravitational potential theory. Interestingly, the framework, dubbed EMOND, is able to reproduce the observed mass discrepancies in both galaxies and galaxy clusters, and to produce multi-center systems with offsets between the peaks of gravity and the peaks of the baryonic distribution.
  • A unique signature of the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) paradigm is its peculiar behavior in the vicinity of the points where the total Newtonian acceleration exactly cancels. In the Solar System, these are the saddle points of the gravitational potential near the planets. Typically, such points are embedded into low-acceleration bubbles where modified gravity theories a` la MOND predict significant deviations from Newton's laws. As has been pointed out recently, the Earth-Sun bubble may be visited by the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft in the near future, providing a unique occasion to put these theories to a direct test. In this work, we present a high-precision model of the Solar System's gravitational potential to determine accurate positions and motions of these saddle points and study the predicted dynamical anomalies within the framework of quasi-linear MOND. Considering the expected sensitivity of the LISA Pathfinder probe, we argue that interpolation functions which exhibit a "faster" transition between the two dynamical regimes have a good chance of surviving a null result. An example of such a function is the QMOND analog of the so-called simple interpolating function which agrees well with much of the extragalactic phenomenology. We have also discovered that several of Saturn's outermost satellites periodically intersect the Saturn-Sun bubble, providing the first example of Solar System objects that regularly undergo the MOND regime.
  • We study the evolution of the phase-space of collisionless N-body systems under repeated stirrings or perturbations. We find convergence towards a limited solution group, in accordance with Hansen 2010, that is independent of the initial system and environmental conditions, paying particular attention to the assumed gravitational paradigm (Newtonian and MOND). We examine the effects of changes to the perturbation scheme and in doing so identify a large group of perturbations featuring radial orbit instability (ROI) which always lead to convergence. The attractor is thus found to be a robust and reproducible effect under a variety of circumstances.
  • We present new radial velocity measurements from the Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA), a large scale spectroscopic survey of M-type giants in the Galactic bulge/bar region. The sample of ~4500 new radial velocities, mostly in the region -10 deg < l < +10 deg and b ~ -6 deg more than doubles the existent published data set. Our new data extend our rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile to +20 deg, which is ~2.8 kpc from the Galactic Center. The new data confirm the cylindrical rotation observed at -6 deg and -8 deg, and are an excellent fit to the Shen et al. (2010) N-body bar model. We measure the strength of the TiO molecular band as a first step towards a metallicity ranking of the stellar sample, from which we confirm the presence of a vertical abundance gradient. Our survey finds no strong evidence of previously unknown kinematic streams. We also publish our complete catalog of radial velocities, photometry, TiO band strengths, and spectra, which is available at the IRSA archive: http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/ as well as at UCLA: http://brava.astro.ucla.edu/.
  • Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component - in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11eV - to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.
  • Using strong lensing data Milgrom's MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) or its covariant TeVeS (Tensor-Vector-Scalar Theory) is being examined here as an alternative to the conventional $\Lambda$CDM paradigm. We examine 10 double-image gravitational lensing systems, in which the lens masses have been estimated by stellar population synthesis models. While mild deviations exist, we do not find out that strong cases for outliers to the TeVeS theory.