• Layered metal chalcogenide materials provide a versatile platform to investigate emergent phenomena and two-dimensional (2D) superconductivity at/near the atomically thin limit. In particular, gate-induced interfacial superconductivity realized by the use of an electric-double-layer transistor (EDLT) has greatly extended the capability to electrically induce superconductivity in oxides, nitrides and transition metal chalcogenides and enable one to explore new physics, such as the Ising pairing mechanism. Exploiting gate-induced superconductivity in various materials can provide us with additional platforms to understand emergent interfacial superconductivity. Here, we report the discovery of gate-induced 2D superconductivity in layered 1T-SnSe2, a typical member of the main-group metal dichalcogenide (MDC) family, using an EDLT gating geometry. A superconducting transition temperature Tc around 3.9 K was demonstrated at the EDL interface. The 2D nature of the superconductivity therein was further confirmed based on 1) a 2D Tinkham description of the angle-dependent upper critical field, 2) the existence of a quantum creep state as well as a large ratio of the coherence length to the thickness of superconductivity. Interestingly, the in-plane approaching zero temperature was found to be 2-3 times higher than the Pauli limit, which might be related to an electric field-modulated spin-orbit interaction. Such results provide a new perspective to expand the material matrix available for gate-induced 2D superconductivity and the fundamental understanding of interfacial superconductivity.
  • Superconductors at the atomic two-dimensional (2D) limit are the focus of an enduring fascination in the condensed matter community. This is because, with reduced dimensions, the effects of disorders, fluctuations, and correlations in superconductors become particularly prominent at the atomic 2D limit; thus such superconductors provide opportunities to tackle tough theoretical and experimental challenges. Here, based on the observation of ultrathin 2D superconductivity in mono- and bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS$_2$) with electric-double-layer (EDL) gating, we found that the critical sheet carrier density required to achieve superconductivity in a monolayer MoS$_2$ flake can be as low as 0.55*10$^{14}$cm$^{-2}$, which is much lower than those values in the bilayer and thicker cases in previous report and also our own observations. Further comparison of the phonon dispersion obtained by ab initio calculations indicated that the phonon softening of the acoustic modes around the M point plays a key role in the gate-induced superconductivity within the Bardeen-Cooper Schrieffer (BCS) theory framework. This result might help enrich the understanding of 2D superconductivity with EDL gating.
  • Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging with tremendous potential in many optoelectronic applications due to their strong light-matter interactions. To fully explore their potential in photoconductive detectors, high responsivity and weak signal detection are required. Here, we present high responsivity phototransistors based on few-layer rhenium disulfide (ReS2). Depending on the back gate voltage, source drain bias and incident optical light intensity, the maximum attainable photoresponsivity can reach as high as 88,600 A W-1, which is a record value compared to other two-dimensional materials with similar device structures and two orders of magnitude higher than that of monolayer MoS2. Such high photoresponsivity is attributed to the increased light absorption as well as the gain enhancement due to the existence of trap states in the few-layer ReS2 flakes. It further enables the detection of weak signals, as successfully demonstrated with weak light sources including a lighter and limited fluorescent lighting. Our studies underscore ReS2 as a promising material for future sensitive optoelectronic applications.
  • Lattice structure and symmetry of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials are of key importance to their fundamental mechanical, thermal, electronic and optical properties. Raman spectroscopy, as a convenient and nondestructive tool, however has its limitations on identifying all symmetry allowing Raman modes and determining the corresponding crystal structure of 2D layered materials with high symmetry like graphene and MoS2. Due to lower structural symmetry and extraordinary weak interlayer coupling of ReS2, we successfully identified all 18 first-order Raman active modes for bulk and monolayer ReS2. Without van der Waals (vdW) correction, our local density approximation (LDA) calculations successfully reproduce all the Raman modes. Our calculations also suggest no surface reconstruction effect and the absence of low frequency rigid-layer Raman modes below 100 cm-1. Combining with Raman and LDA thus provides a general approach for studying the vibrational and structural properties of 2D layered materials with lower symmetry.
  • Electrostatic modification of functional materials by electrolytic gating has demonstrated a remarkably wide range of density modulation, a condition crucial for developing novel electronic phases in systems ranging from complex oxides to layered chalcogenides. Yet little is known microscopically when carriers are modulated in electrolyte-gated electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) due to the technical challenge of imaging the buried electrolyte-semiconductor interface. Here, we demonstrate the real-space mapping of the channel conductance in ZnO EDLTs using a cryogenic microwave impedance microscope. A spin-coated ionic gel layer with typical thicknesses below 50 nm allows us to perform high resolution (on the order of 100 nm) sub-surface imaging, while maintaining the capability of inducing the metal-insulator transition under a gate bias. The microwave images vividly show the spatial evolution of channel conductance and its local fluctuations through the transition, as well as the uneven conductance distribution established by a large source-drain bias. The unique combination of ultra-thin ion-gel gating and microwave imaging offers a new opportunity to study the local transport and mesoscopic electronic properties in EDLTs.
  • The ability to detect light over a broad spectral range is central for practical optoelectronic applications, and has been successfully demonstrated with photodetectors of two-dimensional layered crystals such as graphene and MoS2. However, polarization sensitivity within such a photodetector remains elusive. Here we demonstrate a linear-dichroic broadband photodetector with layered black phosphorus transistors, using the strong intrinsic linear dichroism arising from the in-plane optical anisotropy with respect to the atom-buckled direction, which is polarization sensitive over a broad bandwidth from 400 nm to 3750 nm. Especially, a perpendicular build-in electric field induced by gating in black phosphorus transistors can spatially separate the photo-generated electrons and holes in the channel, effectively reducing their recombination rate, and thus enhancing the efficiency and performance for linear dichroism photodetection. This provides new functionality using anisotropic layered black phosphorus, thereby enabling novel optical and optoelectronic device applications.
  • Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have emerged as exciting material systems with atomically thin geometries and unique electronic properties. Pressure is a powerful tool for continuously tuning their crystal and electronic structures away from the pristine states. Here, we systematically investigated the pressurized behavior of MoSe2 up to ~ 60 GPa using multiple experimental techniques and ab -initio calculations. MoSe2 evolves from an anisotropic two-dimensional layered network to a three-dimensional structure without a structural transition, which is a complete contrast to MoS2. The role of the chalcogenide anions in stabilizing different layered patterns is underscored by our layer sliding calculations. MoSe2 possesses highly tunable transport properties under pressure, determined by the gradual narrowing of its band-gap followed by metallization. The continuous tuning of its electronic structure and band-gap in the range of visible light to infrared suggest possible energy-variable optoelectronics applications in pressurized transition-metal dichalcogenides.
  • Semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of 2D TMDs exhibit isotropic behavior, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here, we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with a unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated mono- and few-layer ReS2 field effect transistors (FETs), which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~107) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV dec-1). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known 2D semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic FETs, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale 2D logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of 2D semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications.
  • We demonstrate a graphene-based Salisbury screen consisting of a single layer of graphene placed in close proximity to a gold back reflector. The light absorption in the screen can be actively tuned by electrically gating the carrier density in the graphene layer with an ionic liquid/gel. The screen was designed to achieve maximum absorption at a target wavelength of 3.2 micrometer by using a 600 nm-thick, non-absorbing silica spacer layer. Spectroscopic reflectance measurements were performed in-situ as a function of gate bias. The changes in the reflectance spectra were analyzed using a Fresnel based transfer matrix model in which graphene was treated as an infinitesimally thin sheet with conductivity given by the Kubo formula. Temporal coupled mode theory was employed to analyze and intuitively understand the observed absorption changes in the Salisbury screen. We achieved ~ 6 % change in the optical absorption of graphene by tuning the applied gate bias from 0.8 V to 2.6 V, where 0.8 V corresponds to graphene's charge neutrality point.
  • The valley degree of freedom in layered transition-metal dichalcogenides (MX2) provides the opportunity to extend functionalities of novel spintronics and valleytronics devices. Due to spin splitting induced by spin-orbital coupling (SOC), the non-equilibrium charge carrier imbalance between two degenerate and inequivalent valleys to realize valley/spin polarization has been successfully demonstrated theoretically and supported by optical experiments. However, the generation of a valley/spin current by the valley polarization in MX2 remains elusive and a great challenge. Here, within an electric-double-layer transistor based on WSe2, we demonstrated a spin-coupled valley photocurrent whose direction and magnitude depend on the degree of circular polarization of the incident radiation and can be further greatly modulated with an external electric field. Such room temperature generation and electric control of valley/spin photocurrent provides a new property of electrons in MX2 systems, thereby enabling new degrees of control for quantum-confined spintronics devices.
  • Since the discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in (Ti,Co)O2, the mechanism has been under discussion for a decade. Particularly, the central concern has been whether or not the ferromagnetic exchange interaction is mediated by charge carriers like (Ga,Mn)As. Recent two studies on the control of ferromagnetism in anatase (Ti,Co)O2 at room temperature via electric field effect [Y. Yamada et al., Science 332, 1065 (2011)] and chemical doping [Y. Yamada et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 242502 (2011)] indicate a principal role of electrons in the carrier-mediated exchange interaction. In this article, the authors review fundamental properties of anatase (Ti,Co)O2 and discuss the carrier mediated ferromagnetism.