• In previous implementations of adiabatic quantum algorithms using spin systems, the average Hamiltonian method with Trotter's formula was conventionally adopted to generate an effective instantaneous Hamiltonian that simulates an adiabatic passage. However, this approach had issues with the precision of the effective Hamiltonian and with the adiabaticity of the evolution. In order to address these, we here propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme for adiabatic quantum computation by using the intrinsic Hamiltonian of a realistic spin system to represent the problem Hamiltonian while adiabatically driving the system by an extrinsic Hamiltonian directly induced by electromagnetic pulses. In comparison to the conventional method, we observed two advantages of our approach: improved ease of implementation and higher fidelity. As a showcase example of our approach, we experimentally factor 291311, which is larger than any other quantum factorization known.
  • Single-pixel cameras based on the concepts of compressed sensing (CS) leverage the inherent structure of images to retrieve them with far fewer measurements and operate efficiently over a significantly broader spectral range than conventional silicon-based cameras. Recently, photonic time-stretch (PTS) technique facilitates the emergence of high-speed single-pixel cameras. A significant breakthrough in imaging speed of single-pixel cameras enables observation of fast dynamic phenomena. However, according to CS theory, image reconstruction is an iterative process that consumes enormous amounts of computational time and cannot be performed in real time. To address this challenge, we propose a novel single-pixel imaging technique that can produce high-quality images through rapid acquisition of their effective spatial Fourier spectrum. We employ phase-shifting sinusoidal structured illumination instead of random illumination for spectrum acquisition and apply inverse Fourier transform to the obtained spectrum for image restoration. We evaluate the performance of our prototype system by recognizing quick response (QR) codes and flow cytometric screening of cells. A frame rate of 625 kHz and a compression ratio of 10% are experimentally demonstrated in accordance with the recognition rate of the QR code. An imaging flow cytometer enabling high-content screening with an unprecedented throughput of 100,000 cells/s is also demonstrated. For real-time imaging applications, the proposed single-pixel microscope can significantly reduce the time required for image reconstruction by two orders of magnitude, which can be widely applied in industrial quality control and label-free biomedical imaging.
  • Quantum mechanics provides a statistical description about nature, and thus would be incomplete if its statistical predictions could not be accounted for some realistic models with hidden variables. There are, however, two powerful theorems against the hidden-variable theories showing that certain quantum features cannot be reproduced based on two rationale premises of classicality, the Bell theorem, and noncontextuality, due to Bell, Kochen and Specker (BKS) . Tests of the Bell inequality and the BKS theorem are both of fundamental interests and of great significance . The Bell theorem has already been experimentally verified extensively on many different systems , while the quantum contextuality, which is independent of nonlocality and manifests itself even in a single object, is experimentally more demanding. Moreover, the contextuality has been shown to play a critical role to supply the `magic' for quantum computation, making more extensive experimental verifications in potential systems for quantum computing even more stringent. Here we report an experimental verification of quantum contextuality on an individual atomic nuclear spin-1 system in solids under ambient condition. Such a three-level system is indivisible and thus the compatibility loophole, which exists in the experiments performed on bipartite systems, is closed. Our experimental results confirm that the quantum contextuality cannot be explained by nonlocal entanglement, revealing the fundamental quantumness other than locality/nonlocality within the intrinsic spin freedom of a concrete natural atomic solid-state system at room temperature.
  • Quantum ground-state problems are computationally hard problems; for general many-body Hamiltonians, there is no classical or quantum algorithm known to be able to solve them efficiently. Nevertheless, if a trial wavefunction approximating the ground state is available, as often happens for many problems in physics and chemistry, a quantum computer could employ this trial wavefunction to project the ground state by means of the phase estimation algorithm (PEA). We performed an experimental realization of this idea by implementing a variational-wavefunction approach to solve the ground-state problem of the Heisenberg spin model with an NMR quantum simulator. Our iterative phase estimation procedure yields a high accuracy for the eigenenergies (to the 10^-5 decimal digit). The ground-state fidelity was distilled to be more than 80%, and the singlet-to-triplet switching near the critical field is reliably captured. This result shows that quantum simulators can better leverage classical trial wavefunctions than classical computers.
  • Quantum simulation can beat current classical computers with minimally a few tens of qubits and will likely become the first practical use of a quantum computer. One promising application of quantum simulation is to attack challenging quantum chemistry problems. Here we report an experimental demonstration that a small nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) quantum computer is already able to simulate the dynamics of a prototype chemical reaction. The experimental results agree well with classical simulations. We conclude that the quantum simulation of chemical reaction dynamics not computable on current classical computers is feasible in the near future.
  • The method of quantum cloning is divided into two main categories: approximate and probabilistic quantum cloning. The former method is used to approximate an unknown quantum state deterministically, and the latter can be used to faithfully copy the state probabilistically. So far, many approximate cloning machines have been experimentally demonstrated, but probabilistic cloning remains an experimental challenge, as it requires more complicated networks and a higher level of precision control. In this work, we designed an efficient quantum network with a limited amount of resources, and performed the first experimental demonstration of probabilistic quantum cloning in an NMR quantum computer. In our experiment, the optimal cloning efficiency proposed by Duan and Guo [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{80}, 4999 (1998)] is achieved.
  • Geometric phase (GP) independent of energy and time rely only on the geometry of state space. It has been argued to have potential fault tolerance and plays an important role in quantum information and quantum computation. We present the first experiment for producing and measuring an Abelian geometric phase shift in a three-level system by using NMR interferometry. In contrast to existing experiments, based on the geometry of $S^2$, our experiment concerns the geometric phase with the geometry of $SU(3)/U(2)$. Two interacting qubits have been used to provide such a three-dimensional Hilbert space.
  • While exact cloning of an unknown quantum state is prohibited by the linearity of quantum mechanics, approximate cloning is possible and has been used, e.g., to derive limits on the security of quantum communication protocols. In the case of asymmetric cloning, the information from the input state is distributed asymmetrically between the different output states. Here, we consider asymmetric phase-covariant cloning, where the goal is to optimally transfer the phase information from a single input qubit to different output qubits. We construct an optimal quantum cloning machine for two qubits that does not require ancilla qubits and implement it on an NMR quantum information processor.