• Stars form in clustered environments, but how they form when the available resources are shared is still not well understood. A related question is whether the IMF is in fact universal across galactic environments, a galactic initial mass function (IGIMF), or whether it is an average of local IMFs. One of the long-standing problems in resolving this question and in the study of young clusters is observational: the emission from multiple sources is frequently seen as blended because at different wavelengths or with different telescopes the beam sizes are different. The confusion hinders our ability to fully characterize clustered star formation. Here we present a new method that uses a genetic algorithm and Bayesian inference to fit the blended SEDs and images of individual YSOs in confused clusters. We apply this method to the infrared photometry of a sample comprising 70 Spitzer-selected, low-mass ($M_{\rm{cl}}<100~\rm{M}_{\odot}$) young clusters in the galactic plane, and use the derived physical parameters to investigate the distributions of masses and evolutionary stages of clustered YSOs, and the implications of those distributions for studies of the IMF and the different models of star formation. We find that for low-mass clusters composed of class I and class II YSOs, there exists a non-trivial relationship between the total stellar mass of the cluster ($M_{\rm{cl}}$) and the mass of its most massive member ($m_{\rm{max}}$). The properties of the derived correlation are most compatible with the random sampling of a Kroupa IMF, with a fundamental high-mass limit of $150~\rm{M}_{\odot}$. Our results are also compatible with SPH models that predict a dynamical termination of the accretion in protostars, with massive stars undergoing this stopping at later times in their evolution.
  • Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in high-mass star-forming molecular clouds. Their relation with high-mass star formation is still to be understood. Here we report interferometric observations toward 8 filamentary high-mass star-forming clouds. A total of 50 dense cores are identified in these clouds, most of which present signatures of high-mass star formation. Five of them are not associated with any star formation indicators, hence are prestellar core candidates. Evolutionary phases of these cores and their linewidths, temperatures, NH$_3$ abundances, and virial parameters are found to be correlated. In a sub-sample of 4 morphologically well-defined filaments, we find that their fragmentation can not be solely explained by thermal or turbulence pressure support. We also investigate distributions of gas temperatures and non-thermal motions along the filaments, and find a spatial correlation between non-thermal linewidths and star formation activities. We find evidence of gas flows along these filaments, and derive an accretion rate along filaments of $\sim$10$^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. These results suggest a strong relationship between massive filaments and high-mass star formation, through i) filamentary fragmentation in very early evolutionary phases to form dense cores, ii) accretion flows along filaments that are important for the growth of dense cores and protostars, and iii) enhancement of non-thermal motion in the filaments by the feedback or accretion during star formation.
  • The existence of "radio weak BL Lac objects" (RWBLs) has been an open question, still unsolved, since the discovery that quasars could be radio-quiet or radio-loud. Recently several groups identified RWBL candidates, mostly found while searching for low energy counterparts of the unidentified/unassociated gamma-ray sources listed in the Fermi catalogs. Confirming RWBLs is a challenging task since they could be confused with white dwarfs (WDs) or weak emission line quasars (WELQs) when there are not sufficient data to precisely draw their broad band spectral energy distribution and their classification is mainly based on a featureless optical spectra. Motivated by the recent discovery that Fermi BL Lacs appear to have very peculiar mid-IR emission, we show that it is possible to distinguish between WDs, WELQs and BL Lacs using the [3.4]-[4.6]-[12]$\mu$m color-color plot built using the WISE magnitudes when the optical spectrum is available. On the basis of this analysis, we identify WISE J064459.38+603131 and WISE J141046.00+740511.2 as the first two genuine RWBLs, both potentially associated with Fermi sources. Finally, to strengthen our identification of these objects as true RWBLs, we present multifrequency observations for these two candidates to show that their spectral behavior is indeed consistent with those of the BL Lac population.
  • Despite the fact that blazars constitute the rarest class among active galactic nuclei (AGNs) they are the largest known population of associated $\gamma$-ray sources. Many of the $\gamma$-ray objects listed in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope Third Source catalog (3FGL) are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs), either because they show multifrequency behaviour similar to blazars but lacking optical spectra in the literature, or because the quality of such spectra is too low to confirm their nature. Here we select, out of 585 BCUs in the 3FGL, 42 BCUs which we identify as probable blazars by their WISE infrared colors and which also have optical spectra that are available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Six-Degree Field Galaxy Survey Database (6dFGS). We confirm the blazar nature of all of the sources. We furthermore conclude that 28 of them are BL Lacs, 8 are radio-loud quasars with flat radio spectrum and 6 are BL Lac whose emission is dominated by their host galaxy.
  • Blazars, one of the most extreme class of active galaxies, constitute so far the largest known population of $\gamma$-ray sources and their number is continuously growing in the Fermi catalogs. However in the latest release of the Fermi catalog there is still a large fraction of sources that are classified as blazar candidate of uncertain type (BCUs) for which optical spectroscopic observations are necessary to confirm their nature and their associations. In addition about 1/3 of the $\gamma$-ray point sources listed in the Third Fermi-LAT Source Catalog (3FGL) are still unassociated and lacking an assigned lower energy counterpart. Since 2012 we have been carrying out an optical spectroscopic campaign to observe blazar candidates to confirm their nature. In this paper, the sixth of the series, we present optical spectroscopic observations for 30 $\gamma$-ray blazar candidates from different observing programs we carried out with the TNG, WHT, OAN, SOAR and Magellan telescopes. We found that 21 out of 30 sources investigated are BL Lac objects while the remaining targets are classified as flat spectrum radio quasars showing the typical broad emission lines of normal quasi stellar objects. We conclude that our selection of $\gamma$-ray blazars candidates based on their multifrequency properties continues to be a successful way to discover potential low-energy counterparts of the FermiUnidentified Gamma-ray Sources (UGSs) and to confirm the nature of BCUs.
  • (abridged) The majority of star-forming galaxies follow a simple empirical correlation in the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass ($M_*$) plane, usually referred to as the star formation Main Sequence (MS). Here we combine a set of hydro-dynamical simulations of interacting galactic disks with state-of-the-art radiative transfer codes to analyze how the evolution of mergers is reflected upon the properties of the MS. We present \textsc{Chiburst}, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) code that fits the multi-wavelength, broad-band photometry of galaxies and derives stellar masses, star formation rates, and geometrical properties of the dust distribution. We apply this tool to the SEDs of simulated mergers and compare the derived results with the reference output from the simulations. Our results indicate that changes in the SEDs of mergers as they approach coalescence and depart from the MS are related to an evolution of dust geometry in scales larger than a few hundred parsecs. This is reflected in a correlation between the specific star formation rate (sSFR), and the compactness parameter $\mathcal{C}$, that parametrizes this geometry and hence the evolution of dust temperature ($T_{\rm{dust}}$) with time. As mergers approach coalescence, they depart from the MS and increase their compactness, which implies that moderate outliers of the MS are consistent with late-type mergers. By further applying our method to real observations of Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs), we show that the merger scenario is unable to explain these extreme outliers of the MS. Only by significantly increasing the gas fraction in the simulations are we able to reproduce the SEDs of LIRGs.
  • Spatially resolved kinematics have been used to determine the dynamical status of star-forming galaxies with ambiguous morphologies, and constrain the importance of galaxy interactions during the assembly of galaxies. However, measuring the importance of interactions or galaxy merger rates requires knowledge of the systematics in kinematic diagnostics and the visible time with merger indicators. We analyze the dynamics of star-forming gas in a set of binary merger hydrodynamic simulations with stellar mass ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. We find that the evolution of kinematic asymmetries traced by star-forming gas mirrors morphological asymmetries derived from mock optical images, in which both merger indicators show the largest deviation from isolated disks during strong interaction phases. Based on a series of simulations with various initial disk orientations, orbital parameters, gas fractions, and mass ratios, we find that the merger signatures are visible for ~0.2-0.4 Gyr with kinematic merger indicators but can be approximately twice as long for equal-mass mergers of massive gas-rich disk galaxies designed to be analogs of z~2-3 submillimeter galaxies. Merger signatures are most apparent after the second passage and before the black holes coalescence, but in some cases they persist up to several hundred Myr after coalescence. About 20-60% of the simulated galaxies are not identified as mergers during the strong interaction phase, implying that galaxies undergoing violent merging process do not necessarily exhibit highly asymmetric kinematics in their star-forming gas. The lack of identifiable merger signatures in this population can lead to an underestimation of merger abundances in star-forming galaxies, and including them in samples of star-forming disks may bias the measurements of disk properties such as intrinsic velocity dispersion.
  • We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for $\sim3000$ young high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey, derived from adjusting single temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 \micron\ from the Herschel/Hi-Gal and APEX/ATLASGAL surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are: $16.8\pm0.2$ K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (Quiescent clumps), $18.6\pm0.2$ K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an HII region (Protostellar clumps), and $23.7\pm0.2$ and $28.1\pm0.3$ K for clumps associated with HII and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the Protostellar clump population is $0.20\pm0.02$ gr cm$^{-2}$, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the Quiescent clumps the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that they are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the Protostellar or HII region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the Quiescent clumps.
  • The Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) First Source Catalog (1FGL) was released in February 2010 and the Fermi-LAT 2-Year Source Catalog (2FGL) appeared in April 2012, based on data from 24 months of operation. Since their releases, many follow up observations of unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) were performed and new procedures to associate gamma-ray sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths were developed. Here we review and characterize all the associations as published in the 1FGL and 2FGL catalog on the basis of multifrequency archival observations. In particular we located 177 spectra for the low-energy counterparts that were not listed in the previous Fermi catalogs, and in addition we present new spectroscopic observations of 8 gamma-ray blazar candidates. Based on our investigations, we introduce a new counterpart category of "candidate associations" and propose a refined classification for the candidate low-energy counterparts of the Fermi sources. We compare the 1FGL-assigned counterparts with those listed in the 2FGL to determine which unassociated sources became associated in later releases of the Fermi catalogs. We also search for potential counterparts to all the remaining unassociated Fermi sources. Finally, we prepare a refined and merged list of all the associations of the 1FGL plus 2FGL catalogs that includes 2219 unique Fermi objects. This is the most comprehensive and systematic study of all the associations collected for the gamma-ray sources available to date. We conclude that 80% of the Fermi sources have at least one known plausible gamma-ray emitter within their positional uncertainty regions.
  • The total infrared (IR) luminosity is very useful for estimating the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies, but converting the IR luminosity into an SFR relies on assumptions that do not hold for all galaxies. We test the effectiveness of the IR luminosity as an SFR indicator by applying it to synthetic spectral energy distributions generated from three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of isolated disc galaxies and galaxy mergers. In general, the SFR inferred from the IR luminosity agrees well with the true instantaneous SFR of the simulated galaxies. However, for the major mergers in which a strong starburst is induced, the SFR inferred from the IR luminosity can overestimate the instantaneous SFR during the post-starburst phase by greater than two orders of magnitude. Even though the instantaneous SFR decreases rapidly after the starburst, the stars that were formed in the starburst remain dust-obscured and thus produce significant IR luminosity. Consequently, use of the IR luminosity as an SFR indicator may cause one to conclude that post-starburst galaxies are still star-forming, whereas in reality, star formation was recently quenched.
  • The Cygnus-X star-forming complex is one of the most active regions of low and high mass star formation within 2 kpc of the Sun. Using mid-infrared photometry from the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer Cygnus-X Legacy Survey, we have identified over 1800 protostar candidates. We compare the protostellar luminosity functions of two regions within Cygnus-X: CygX-South and CygX-North. These two clouds show distinctly different morphologies suggestive of dissimilar star-forming environments. We find the luminosity functions of these two regions are statistically different. Furthermore, we compare the luminosity functions of protostars found in regions of high and low stellar density within Cygnus-X and find that the luminosity function in regions of high stellar density is biased to higher luminosities. In total, these observations provide further evidence that the luminosities of protostars depend on their natal environment. We discuss the implications this dependence has for the star formation process.
  • Nearly one-third of the gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi are still unidentified, despite significant recent progress in this effort. On the other hand, all the gamma-ray extragalactic sources associated in the second Fermi-LAT catalog have a radio counterpart. Motivated by this observational evidence we investigate all the radio sources of the major radio surveys that lie within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) at 95% level of confidence. First we search for their infrared counterparts in the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and then we analyze their IR colors in comparison with those of the known gamma-ray blazars. We propose a new approach, based on a 2-dimensional kernel density estimation (KDE) technique in the single [3.4]-[4.6]-[12] micron WISE color-color plot, replacing the constraint imposed in our previous investigations on the detection at 22 micron of each potential IR counterpart of the UGSs with associated radio emission. The main goal of this analysis is to find distant gamma-ray blazar candidates that, being too faint at 22 micron, are not detected by WISE and thus are not selected by our purely IR based methods. We find fifty-five UGS's likely correspond to radio sources with blazar-like IR signatures. Additional eleven UGSs having, blazar-like IR colors, have been found within the sample of sources found with deep recent ATCA observations.
  • We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to simulated SEDs close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient to identify interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.
  • The near-Earth object (NEO) population, which mainly consists of fragments from collisions between asteroids in the main asteroid belt, is thought to include contributions from short-period comets as well. One of the most promising NEO candidates for a cometary origin is near-Earth asteroid (3552) Don Quixote, which has never been reported to show activity. Here we present the discovery of cometary activity in Don Quixote based on thermal-infrared observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope in its 3.6 and 4.5 {\mu}m bands. Our observations clearly show the presence of a coma and a tail in the 4.5 {\mu}m but not in the 3.6 {\mu}m band, which is consistent with molecular band emission from CO2. Thermal modeling of the combined photometric data on Don Quixote reveals a diameter of 18.4 (-0.4/+0.3) km and an albedo of 0.03 (-0.01/+0.02), which confirms Don Quixote to be the third-largest known NEO. We derive an upper limit on the dust production rate of 1.9 kg s^-1 and derive a CO2 gas production rate of (1.1+-0.1)10^26 molecules s^-1. Spitzer IRS spectroscopic observations indicate the presence of fine-grained silicates, perhaps pyroxene rich, on the surface of Don Quixote. Our discovery suggests that CO2 can be present in near-Earth space over a long time. The presence of CO2 might also explain that Don Quixote's cometary nature remained hidden for nearly three decades.
  • A significant fraction (~30%) of the high-energy gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi LAT catalog (2FGL) are still of unknown origin, being not yet associated with counterparts at low energies. We recently developed a new association method to identify if there is a gamma-ray blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic 2FGL source. This method is entirely based on the discovery that blazars have distinct infrared colors with respect to other extragalactic sources found thanks, to the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky observations. Several improvements have been also performed to increase the efficiency of our method in recognizing gamma-ray blazar candidates. In this paper we applied our method to two different samples, the first constituted by the unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) while the second by the active galaxies of uncertain type (AGUs), both listed in the 2FGL. We present a catalog of IR counterparts for ~20% of the UGSs investigated. Then, we also compare our results on the associated sources with those present in literature. In addition, we illustrate the extensive archival research carried out to identify the radio, infrared, optical and X-ray counterparts of the WISE selected, gamma-ray blazar candidates. Finally, we discuss the future developments of our method based on ground-based follow-up observations.
  • One of the main scientific objectives of the recent Fermi mission is investigating the origin of the unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the gamma-ray source localization with respect to the past gamma-ray missions, about 1/3 of the gamma-ray objects detected do not have yet an assigned counterpart a low energies. We recently developed a new association method to identify if there is a gamma-ray blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic gamma-ray source. This method is entirely based on the discovery that blazars, the largest known class of gamma-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared colors. Here we summarize the results obtained by applying our association procedure to the unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) and to the active galaxies of uncertain type (AGUs) listed in the Second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog.
  • We measured and modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFR), specific star formation rates (sSFR), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increases in the dust luminosity and mass, SFR, and cold (15-25 K) dust temperature as the interaction progresses from moderately to strongly interacting and between non- interacting and strongly interacting galaxies. We also find increases in the SFR between weakly and strongly interacting galaxies. In contrast, the sSFR remains unchanged across all the interaction stages. The SFR derived from the SED modeling agrees well with rates estimated by proportionality relations that depend on infrared emission. (abridged)
  • Despite the large number of discoveries made recently by Fermi, the origins of the so called unidentified gamma-ray sources remain unknown. The large number of these sources suggests that among them there could be a population that significantly contributes to the isotropic gamma-ray background and is therefore crucial to understand their nature. The first step toward a complete comprehension of the unidentified gamma-ray source population is to identify those that can be associated with blazars, the most numerous class of extragalactic sources in the gamma-ray sky. Recently, we discovered that blazars can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources using the infrared (IR) WISE satellite colors. The blazar population delineates a remarkable and distinctive region of the IR color-color space, the WISE blazar strip. In particular, the subregion delineated by the gamma-ray emitting blazars is even narrower and we named it as the WISE Gamma-ray Strip (WGS). In this paper we parametrize the WGS on the basis of a single parameter s that we then use to determine if gamma-ray Active Galactic Nuclei of the uncertain type (AGUs) detected by Fermi are consistent with the WGS and so can be considered blazar candidates. We find that 54 AGUs out of a set 60 analyzed have IR colors consistent with the WGS; only 6 AGUs are outliers. This result implies that a very high percentage (i.e., in this sample about 90%) of the AGUs detected by Fermi are indeed blazar candidates.
  • Blazars constitute the most interesting and enigmatic class of extragalactic gamma-ray sources dominated by non-thermal emission. In this Letter, we show how the WISE infrared data make possible to identify a distinct region of the [3.4]-[4.6]-[12] micron color-color diagram where the sources dominated by the the thermal radiation are separated from those dominated by non-thermal emission, in particular the blazar population. This infrared non-thermal region delineated as the WISE Blazar Strip (WBS), it is a powerful new diagnostic tool when the full WISE survey data is released. The WBS can be used to extract new blazar candidates, to identify those of uncertain type and also to search for the counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources. We show one example of the value of the use of the WBS identifying the TeV source VER J 0648+152, recently discovered by VERITAS.
  • The evolution of galaxies is greatly influenced by their interactions. As part of a program to study interacting galaxies, we have measured and modeled the spectral energy distri- butions (SEDs) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (FIR). We describe the constraints imposed on star formation histories by these SEDs, and the variations therein seen across the interaction sequence, and we compare the results of different star formation rate prescriptions applied to the data. The sample itself is based on the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey (SIGS) of 111 galaxies in 50 systems, a project designed to probe a range of galaxy interaction parameters in the infrared. Our SEDs combine the Spitzer results with multiwavelength data from other missions, in particular GALEX and Herschel. The subset presented here is the sample for which FIR Herschel observations are currently publicly available.
  • We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic Center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on IRAC colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), which spans the central ~300 pc region of the Milky Way Galaxy. We obtained IRS spectra over 5um to 35um using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4um shoulder on the absorption profile of 15um CO2 ice, suggestive of CO2 ice mixed with CH3OH ice on grains. This 15.4um shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that 9 massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from CO2, C2H2, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8 - 23 Msun, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of ~0.07 Msun/yr at the GC.
  • We report the detection and successful modeling of the unusual 9.7\mum Si--O stretching silicate emission feature in the type 1 (i.e. face-on) LINER nucleus of M81. Using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on Spitzer, we determine the feature in the central 230 pc of M81 to be in strong emission, with a peak at ~10.5\mum. This feature is strikingly different in character from the absorption feature of the galactic interstellar medium, and from the silicate absorption or weak emission features typical of galaxies with active star formation. We successfully model the high signal-to-noise ratio IRS spectra with porous silicate dust using laboratory-acquired mineral spectra. We find that the most probable fit uses micron-sized, porous grains of amorphous silicate and graphite. In addition to silicate dust, there is weak PAH emission present (particularly at 11.3\mum, arising from the C--H out-of-plane bending vibration of relatively large PAHs of ~500--1000 C atoms) whose character reflects the low-excitation AGN environment, with some evidence that small PAHs of ~100--200 C atoms (responsible for the 7.7\mum C--C stretching band) in the immediate vicinity of the nucleus have been preferentially destroyed. (abstract continues)
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Paul A. Abell, Julius Allison, Scott F. Anderson, John R. Andrew, J. Roger P. Angel, Lee Armus, David Arnett, S. J. Asztalos, Tim S. Axelrod, Stephen Bailey, D. R. Ballantyne, Justin R. Bankert, Wayne A. Barkhouse, Jeffrey D. Barr, L. Felipe Barrientos, Aaron J. Barth, James G. Bartlett, Andrew C. Becker, Jacek Becla, Timothy C. Beers, Joseph P. Bernstein, Rahul Biswas, Michael R. Blanton, Joshua S. Bloom, John J. Bochanski, Pat Boeshaar, Kirk D. Borne, Marusa Bradac, W. N. Brandt, Carrie R. Bridge, Michael E. Brown, Robert J. Brunner, James S. Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, James H. Burge, David L. Burke, Phillip A. Cargile, Srinivasan Chandrasekharan, George Chartas, Steven R. Chesley, You-Hua Chu, David Cinabro, Mark W. Claire, Charles F. Claver, Douglas Clowe, A. J. Connolly, Kem H. Cook, Jeff Cooke, Asantha Cooray, Kevin R. Covey, Christopher S. Culliton, Roelof de Jong, Willem H. de Vries, Victor P. Debattista, Francisco Delgado, Ian P. Dell'Antonio, Saurav Dhital, Rosanne Di Stefano, Mark Dickinson, Benjamin Dilday, S.G. Djorgovski, Gregory Dobler, Ciro Donalek, Gregory Dubois-Felsmann, Josef Durech, Ardis Eliasdottir, Michael Eracleous, Laurent Eyer, Emilio E. Falco, Xiaohui Fan, Christopher D. Fassnacht, Harry C. Ferguson, Yanga R. Fernandez, Brian D. Fields, Douglas Finkbeiner, Eduardo E. Figueroa, Derek B. Fox, Harold Francke, James S. Frank, Josh Frieman, Sebastien Fromenteau, Muhammad Furqan, Gaspar Galaz, A. Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Eric Gawiser, John Geary, Perry Gee, Robert R. Gibson, Kirk Gilmore, Emily A. Grace, Richard F. Green, William J. Gressler, Carl J. Grillmair, Salman Habib, J. S. Haggerty, Mario Hamuy, Alan W. Harris, Suzanne L. Hawley, Alan F. Heavens, Leslie Hebb, Todd J. Henry, Edward Hileman, Eric J. Hilton, Keri Hoadley, J. B. Holberg, Matt J. Holman, Steve B. Howell, Leopoldo Infante, Zeljko Ivezic, Suzanne H. Jacoby, Bhuvnesh Jain, R, Jedicke, M. James Jee, J. Garrett Jernigan, Saurabh W. Jha, Kathryn V. Johnston, R. Lynne Jones, Mario Juric, Mikko Kaasalainen, Styliani Kafka, Steven M. Kahn, Nathan A. Kaib, Jason Kalirai, Jeff Kantor, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Charles R. Keeton, Richard Kessler, Zoran Knezevic, Adam Kowalski, Victor L. Krabbendam, K. Simon Krughoff, Shrinivas Kulkarni, Stephen Kuhlman, Mark Lacy, Sebastien Lepine, Ming Liang, Amy Lien, Paulina Lira, Knox S. Long, Suzanne Lorenz, Jennifer M. Lotz, R. H. Lupton, Julie Lutz, Lucas M. Macri, Ashish A. Mahabal, Rachel Mandelbaum, Phil Marshall, Morgan May, Peregrine M. McGehee, Brian T. Meadows, Alan Meert, Andrea Milani, Christopher J. Miller, Michelle Miller, David Mills, Dante Minniti, David Monet, Anjum S. Mukadam, Ehud Nakar, Douglas R. Neill, Jeffrey A. Newman, Sergei Nikolaev, Martin Nordby, Paul O'Connor, Masamune Oguri, John Oliver, Scot S. Olivier, Julia K. Olsen, Knut Olsen, Edward W. Olszewski, Hakeem Oluseyi, Nelson D. Padilla, Alex Parker, Joshua Pepper, John R. Peterson, Catherine Petry, Philip A. Pinto, James L. Pizagno, Bogdan Popescu, Andrej Prsa, Veljko Radcka, M. Jordan Raddick, Andrew Rasmussen, Arne Rau, Jeonghee Rho, James E. Rhoads, Gordon T. Richards, Stephen T. Ridgway, Brant E. Robertson, Rok Roskar, Abhijit Saha, Ata Sarajedini, Evan Scannapieco, Terry Schalk, Rafe Schindler, Samuel Schmidt, Sarah Schmidt, Donald P. Schneider, German Schumacher, Ryan Scranton, Jacques Sebag, Lynn G. Seppala, Ohad Shemmer, Joshua D. Simon, M. Sivertz, Howard A. Smith, J. Allyn Smith, Nathan Smith, Anna H. Spitz, Adam Stanford, Keivan G. Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael A. Strauss, Christopher W. Stubbs, Donald W. Sweeney, Alex Szalay, Paula Szkody, Masahiro Takada, Paul Thorman, David E. Trilling, Virginia Trimble, Anthony Tyson, Richard Van Berg, Daniel Vanden Berk, Jake VanderPlas, Licia Verde, Bojan Vrsnak, Lucianne M. Walkowicz, Benjamin D. Wandelt, Sheng Wang, Yun Wang, Michael Warner, Risa H. Wechsler, Andrew A. West, Oliver Wiecha, Benjamin F. Williams, Beth Willman, David Wittman, Sidney C. Wolff, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Przemek Wozniak, Patrick Young, Andrew Zentner, Hu Zhan
    A survey that can cover the sky in optical bands over wide fields to faint magnitudes with a fast cadence will enable many of the exciting science opportunities of the next decade. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will have an effective aperture of 6.7 meters and an imaging camera with field of view of 9.6 deg^2, and will be devoted to a ten-year imaging survey over 20,000 deg^2 south of +15 deg. Each pointing will be imaged 2000 times with fifteen second exposures in six broad bands from 0.35 to 1.1 microns, to a total point-source depth of r~27.5. The LSST Science Book describes the basic parameters of the LSST hardware, software, and observing plans. The book discusses educational and outreach opportunities, then goes on to describe a broad range of science that LSST will revolutionize: mapping the inner and outer Solar System, stellar populations in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, the structure of the Milky Way disk and halo and other objects in the Local Volume, transient and variable objects both at low and high redshift, and the properties of normal and active galaxies at low and high redshift. It then turns to far-field cosmological topics, exploring properties of supernovae to z~1, strong and weak lensing, the large-scale distribution of galaxies and baryon oscillations, and how these different probes may be combined to constrain cosmological models and the physics of dark energy.
  • The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) carried out a 250, 350 and 500 micron survey of the galactic plane encompassing the Vela Molecular Ridge, with the primary goal of identifying the coldest dense cores possibly associated with the earliest stages of star formation. Here we present the results from observations of the Vela-D region, covering about 4 square degrees, in which we find 141 BLAST cores. We exploit existing data taken with the Spitzer MIPS, IRAC and SEST-SIMBA instruments to constrain their (single-temperature) spectral energy distributions, assuming a dust emissivity index beta = 2.0. This combination of data allows us to determine the temperature, luminosity and mass of each BLAST core, and also enables us to separate starless from proto-stellar sources. We also analyze the effects that the uncertainties on the derived physical parameters of the individual sources have on the overall physical properties of starless and proto-stellar cores, and we find that there appear to be a smooth transition from the pre- to the proto-stellar phase. In particular, for proto-stellar cores we find a correlation between the MIPS24 flux, associated with the central protostar, and the temperature of the dust envelope. We also find that the core mass function of the Vela-D cores has a slope consistent with other similar (sub)millimeter surveys.
  • We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0um), C2H2 (13.7um) and HCN (14.0um). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15um CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observations demonstrate the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.