• Many ant species employ distributed population density estimation in applications ranging from quorum sensing [Pra05], to task allocation [Gor99], to appraisal of enemy colony strength [Ada90]. It has been shown that ants estimate density by tracking encounter rates -- the higher the population density, the more often the ants bump into each other [Pra05,GPT93]. We study distributed density estimation from a theoretical perspective. We prove that a group of anonymous agents randomly walking on a grid are able to estimate their density within a small multiplicative error in few steps by measuring their rates of encounter with other agents. Despite dependencies inherent in the fact that nearby agents may collide repeatedly (and, worse, cannot recognize when this happens), our bound nearly matches what would be required to estimate density by independently sampling grid locations. From a biological perspective, our work helps shed light on how ants and other social insects can obtain relatively accurate density estimates via encounter rates. From a technical perspective, our analysis provides new tools for understanding complex dependencies in the collision probabilities of multiple random walks. We bound the strength of these dependencies using $local\ mixing\ properties$ of the underlying graph. Our results extend beyond the grid to more general graphs and we discuss applications to size estimation for social networks and density estimation for robot swarms.
  • We give a new randomized distributed algorithm for $(\Delta+1)$-coloring in the LOCAL model, running in $O(\sqrt{\log \Delta})+ 2^{O(\sqrt{\log \log n})}$ rounds in a graph of maximum degree~$\Delta$. This implies that the $(\Delta+1)$-coloring problem is easier than the maximal independent set problem and the maximal matching problem, due to their lower bounds of $\Omega \left( \min \left( \sqrt{\frac{\log n}{\log \log n}}, \frac{\log \Delta}{\log \log \Delta} \right) \right)$ by Kuhn, Moscibroda, and Wattenhofer [PODC'04]. Our algorithm also extends to list-coloring where the palette of each node contains $\Delta+1$ colors. We extend the set of distributed symmetry-breaking techniques by performing a decomposition of graphs into dense and sparse parts.
  • We present a new scaling algorithm for maximum (or minimum) weight perfect matching on general, edge weighted graphs. Our algorithm runs in $O(m\sqrt{n}\log(nN))$ time, $O(m\sqrt{n})$ per scale, which matches the running time of the best cardinality matching algorithms on sparse graphs. Here $m,n,$ and $N$ bound the number of edges, vertices, and magnitude of any edge weight. Our result improves on a 25-year old algorithm of Gabow and Tarjan, which runs in $O(m\sqrt{n\log n\alpha(m,n)} \log(nN))$ time.
  • We study a family of closely-related distributed graph problems, which we call degree splitting, where roughly speaking the objective is to partition (or orient) the edges such that each node's degree is split almost uniformly. Our findings lead to answers for a number of problems, a sampling of which includes: -- We present a $poly(\log n)$ round deterministic algorithm for $(2\Delta-1)\cdot (1+o(1))$-edge-coloring, where $\Delta$ denotes the maximum degree. Modulo the $1+o(1)$ factor, this settles one of the long-standing open problems of the area from the 1990's (see e.g. Panconesi and Srinivasan [PODC'92]). Indeed, a weaker requirement of $(2\Delta-1)\cdot poly(\log \Delta)$-edge-coloring in $poly(\log n)$ rounds was asked for in the 4th open question in the Distributed Graph Coloring book by Barenboim and Elkin. -- We show that sinkless orientation---i.e., orienting edges such that each node has at least one outgoing edge---on $\Delta$-regular graphs can be solved in $O(\log_{\Delta} \log n)$ rounds randomized and in $O(\log_{\Delta} n)$ rounds deterministically. These prove the corresponding lower bounds by Brandt et al. [STOC'16] and Chang, Kopelowitz, and Pettie [FOCS'16] to be tight. Moreover, these show that sinkless orientation exhibits an exponential separation between its randomized and deterministic complexities, akin to the results of Chang et al. for $\Delta$-coloring $\Delta$-regular trees. -- We present a randomized $O(\log^4 n)$ round algorithm for orienting $a$-arboricity graphs with maximum out-degree $a(1+\epsilon)$. This can be also turned into a decomposition into $a (1+\epsilon)$ forests when $a=\Omega(\log n)$ and into $a (1+\epsilon)$ pseduo-forests when $a=o(\log n)$. Obtaining an efficient distributed decomposition into less than $2a$ forests was stated as the 10th open problem in the book by Barenboim and Elkin.
  • We study the problem of computing the minimum cut in a weighted distributed message-passing networks (the CONGEST model). Let $\lambda$ be the minimum cut, $n$ be the number of nodes in the network, and $D$ be the network diameter. Our algorithm can compute $\lambda$ exactly in $O((\sqrt{n} \log^{*} n+D)\lambda^4 \log^2 n)$ time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that explicitly studies computing the exact minimum cut in the distributed setting. Previously, non-trivial sublinear time algorithms for this problem are known only for unweighted graphs when $\lambda\leq 3$ due to Pritchard and Thurimella's $O(D)$-time and $O(D+n^{1/2}\log^* n)$-time algorithms for computing $2$-edge-connected and $3$-edge-connected components. By using the edge sampling technique of Karger's, we can convert this algorithm into a $(1+\epsilon)$-approximation $O((\sqrt{n}\log^{*} n+D)\epsilon^{-5}\log^3 n)$-time algorithm for any $\epsilon>0$. This improves over the previous $(2+\epsilon)$-approximation $O((\sqrt{n}\log^{*} n+D)\epsilon^{-5}\log^2 n\log\log n)$-time algorithm and $O(\epsilon^{-1})$-approximation $O(D+n^{\frac{1}{2}+\epsilon} \mathrm{poly}\log n)$-time algorithm of Ghaffari and Kuhn. Due to the lower bound of $\Omega(D+n^{1/2}/\log n)$ by Das Sarma et al. which holds for any approximation algorithm, this running time is tight up to a $ \mathrm{poly}\log n$ factor. To get the stated running time, we developed an approximation algorithm which combines the ideas of Thorup's algorithm and Matula's contraction algorithm. It saves an $\epsilon^{-9}\log^{7} n$ factor as compared to applying Thorup's tree packing theorem directly. Then, we combine Kutten and Peleg's tree partitioning algorithm and Karger's dynamic programming to achieve an efficient distributed algorithm that finds the minimum cut when we are given a spanning tree that crosses the minimum cut exactly once.
  • In this paper, we study the problem of approximating the minimum cut in a distributed message-passing model, the CONGEST model. The minimum cut problem has been well-studied in the context of centralized algorithms. However, there were no known non-trivial algorithms in the distributed model until the recent work of Ghaffari and Kuhn. They gave algorithms for finding cuts of size $O(\epsilon^{-1}\lambda)$ and $(2+\epsilon)\lambda$ in $O(D)+\tilde{O}(n^{1/2+\epsilon})$ rounds and $\tilde{O}(D+\sqrt{n})$ rounds respectively, where $\lambda$ is the size of the minimum cut. This matches the lower bound they provided up to a polylogarithmic factor. Yet, no scheme that achieves $(1+\epsilon)$-approximation ratio is known. We give a distributed algorithm that finds a cut of size $(1+\epsilon)\lambda$ in $\tilde{O}(D+\sqrt{n})$ time, which is optimal up to polylogarithmic factors.
  • The {\em maximum cardinality} and {\em maximum weight matching} problems can be solved in time $\tilde{O}(m\sqrt{n})$, a bound that has resisted improvement despite decades of research. (Here $m$ and $n$ are the number of edges and vertices.) In this article we demonstrate that this "$m\sqrt{n}$ barrier" is extremely fragile, in the following sense. For any $\epsilon>0$, we give an algorithm that computes a $(1-\epsilon)$-approximate maximum weight matching in $O(m\epsilon^{-1}\log\epsilon^{-1})$ time, that is, optimal {\em linear time} for any fixed $\epsilon$. Our algorithm is dramatically simpler than the best exact maximum weight matching algorithms on general graphs and should be appealing in all applications that can tolerate a negligible relative error. Our second contribution is a new {\em exact} maximum weight matching algorithm for integer-weighted bipartite graphs that runs in time $O(m\sqrt{n}\log N)$. This improves on the $O(Nm\sqrt{n})$-time and $O(m\sqrt{n}\log(nN))$-time algorithms known since the mid 1980s, for $1\ll \log N \ll \log n$. Here $N$ is the maximum integer edge weight.