• We set out to quantify the number density of quiescent massive compact galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We determine structural parameters based on i-band imaging using the CFHT equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 (CS82) survey (~170 sq. degrees) taking advantage of an exquisite median seeing of ~0.6''. We select compact massive (M > 5x10^10 M_sun) galaxies within the redshift range of 0.2<z<0.6. The large volume sampled allows to decrease the effect of cosmic variance that has hampered the calculation of the number density for this enigmatic population in many previous studies. We undertake an exhaustive analysis in an effort to untangle the various findings inherent to the diverse definition of compactness present in the literature. We find that the absolute number of compact galaxies is very dependent on the adopted definition and can change up to a factor of >10. We systematically measure a factor of ~5 more compacts at the same redshift than what was previously reported on smaller fields with HST imaging, which are more affected by cosmic variance. This means that the decrease in number density from z ~ 1.5 to z ~ 0.2 might be only of a factor of ~2-5, significantly smaller than what previously reported. This supports progenitor bias as the main contributor to the size evolution. This milder decrease is roughly compatible with the predictions from recent numerical simulations. Only the most extreme compact galaxies, with Reff < 1.5x( M/10^11 M_sun)^0.75 and M > 10^10.7 M_sun, appear to drop in number by a factor of ~20 and hence likely experience a noticeable size evolution.
  • We present high signal-to-noise galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements of the BOSS CMASS sample using 250 square degrees of weak lensing data from CFHTLenS and CS82. We compare this signal with predictions from mock catalogs trained to match observables including the stellar mass function and the projected and two dimensional clustering of CMASS. We show that the clustering of CMASS, together with standard models of the galaxy-halo connection, robustly predicts a lensing signal that is 20-40% larger than observed. Detailed tests show that our results are robust to a variety of systematic effects. Lowering the value of $S_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8} \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$ compared to Planck2015 reconciles the lensing with clustering. However, given the scale of our measurement ($r<10$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc), other effects may also be at play and need to be taken into consideration. We explore the impact of baryon physics, assembly bias, massive neutrinos, and modifications to general relativity on $\Delta\Sigma$ and show that several of these effects may be non-negligible given the precision of our measurement. Disentangling cosmological effects from the details of the galaxy-halo connection, the effects of baryons, and massive neutrinos, is the next challenge facing joint lensing and clustering analyses. This is especially true in the context of large galaxy samples from Baryon Acoustic Oscillation surveys with precise measurements but complex selection functions.
  • In a galaxy cluster, galaxies are mostly collisionless particles in recent epoches. They resemble collisionless cold dark matter particles in some way. Therefore, the spatial distributions of dark matter and cluster galaxies might be expected to possess similar features in the gravitational potential of a cluster. Here we use the galaxy distribution in cluster Cl0024+17 to probe for the ringlike dark matter structure recently discovered by means of strong and weak lensing observations. The galaxies are taken from the catalog of Czoske et al., which contains 650 objects with measured redshifts, of which ~300 galaxies have redshifts in the range 0.37<z<0.41 (and are therefore probable cluster members). We find that, at about the 3-sigma level, the ringlike structure seen in the dark matter measurement is not observed in the projected two-dimensional galaxy distribution.