• High-dispersion spectroscopic monitoring of HESS J0632+057 has been carried out over four orbital cycles in order to search for orbital modulation, covering the entire orbital phase. We have measured radial velocity of H$\alpha$ emission line with the method introduced by Shafter et al. (1986), which has been successfully applied to some Be stars. The velocity is seen to increase much earlier than expected for the orbital period of 315 days, and much more steeply than expected at around "apastron". The period of the H$\alpha$ modulation is found to be as $308^{+26}_{-23}$ days. We have also analyzed Swift/XRT data from 2009 to 2015 to study the orbital modulation, selecting the data with good statistics ($\geq$ 30 counts). With additional two-year data to the previous works, the orbital period has been updated to $313^{+11}_{-8}$ days, which is consistent with the previous X-ray periods and the spectroscopic one. The past XMM-Newton and Chandra observations prefer the period of 313 days. With the new period, assuming that H$\alpha$ velocities accurately trace the motion of the Be star, we have derived a new set of the orbital parameters. In the new orbit, which is less eccentric ($e \sim 0.6$), two outbursts occur after apastron, and just after periastron. Besides, the column density in bright phase ($4.7^{+0.9}_{-08}\times10^{21}\;\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$) is higher than in faint phase ($2.2\pm0.5\times10^{21}\;\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$). These facts suggest that outbursts occur when the compact object passes nearby/through the Be disk. The mass function implies that mass of the compact object is less than 2.5 $\mathrm{M_{sun}}$ assuming that the mass of the Be star is 13.2--18.2 $\mathrm{M_{sun}}$ (Aragona at al. 2010) unless the inclination is extremely small. The photon index indicates that the spectra becomes softer when the system is bright. These suggest that the compact object is a pulsar.
  • We for the first time combine generated adversarial network (GAN) with wide-field light microscopy to achieve deep learning super-resolution under a large field of view (FOV). By appropriately adopting prior microscopy data in an adversarial training, the network can recover a high-resolution, accurate image of new specimen from its single low-resolution measurement. This capacity has been adequately demonstrated by imaging various types of samples, such as USAF resolution target, human pathological slides and fluorescence-labelled fibroblast cells. Their gigapixel, multi-color reconstructions verify a successful GAN-based single image super-resolution procedure. Furthermore, this deep learning-based imaging approach doesn;t necessarily introduce any change to the setup of a conventional wide-filed microscope, reconstructing large FOV (about 95 mm^2), high-resolution (about 1.7 {\mu}m) image at a high speed (in 1 second). As a result, GAN-microscopy opens a new way to computationally overcome the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy that is originally coupled to the physical limitation of system's optics.
  • We for the first time combine generated adversarial network (GAN) with wide-field light microscopy to achieve deep learning super-resolution under a large field of view (FOV). By appropriately adopting prior microscopy data in an adversarial training, the network can recover a high-resolution, accurate image of new specimen from its single low-resolution measurement. This capacity has been adequately demonstrated by imaging various types of samples, such as USAF resolution target, human pathological slides and fluorescence-labelled fibroblast cells. Their gigapixel, multi-color reconstructions verify a successful GAN-based single image super-resolution procedure. Furthermore, this deep learning-based imaging approach doesn;t necessarily introduce any change to the setup of a conventional wide-filed microscope, reconstructing large FOV (about 95 mm^2), high-resolution (about 1.7 {\mu}m) image at a high speed (in 1 second). As a result, GAN-microscopy opens a new way to computationally overcome the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy that is originally coupled to the physical limitation of system's optics.