• The algebraic method provides useful techniques to identify models in designs and to understand aliasing of polynomial models. The present note surveys the topic of Gr\"obner bases in experimental design and then describes the notion of confounding and the algebraic fan of a design. The ideas are illustrated with a variety of design examples ranging from Latin squares to screening designs.
  • In areas such as kernel smoothing and non-parametric regression there is emphasis on smooth interpolation and smooth statistical models. Splines are known to have optimal smoothness properties in one and higher dimensions. It is shown, with special attention to polynomial models, that smooth interpolators can be constructed by first extending the monomial basis and then minimising a measure of smoothness with respect to the free parameters in the extended basis. Algebraic methods are a help in choosing the extended basis which can also be found as a saturated basis for an extended experimental design with dummy design points. One can get arbitrarily close to optimal smoothing for any dimension and over any region, giving a simple alternative models of spline type. The relationship to splines is shown in one and two dimensions. A case study is given which includes benchmarking against kriging methods.
  • For a particular experimental design, there is interest in finding which polynomial models can be identified in the usual regression set up. The algebraic methods based on Groebner bases provide a systematic way of doing this. The algebraic method does not in general produce all estimable models but it can be shown that it yields models which have minimal average degree in a well-defined sense and in both a weighted and unweighted version. This provides an alternative measure to that based on "aberration" and moreover is applicable to any experimental design. A simple algorithm is given and bounds are derived for the criteria, which may be used to give asymptotic Nyquist-like estimability rates as model and sample sizes increase.
  • We study the problem of optimizing nonlinear objective functions over matroids presented by oracles or explicitly. Such functions can be interpreted as the balancing of multi-criteria optimization. We provide a combinatorial polynomial time algorithm for arbitrary oracle-presented matroids, that makes repeated use of matroid intersection, and an algebraic algorithm for vectorial matroids. Our work is partly motivated by applications to minimum-aberration model-fitting in experimental design in statistics, which we discuss and demonstrate in detail.