• Common recurrent neural architectures scale poorly due to the intrinsic difficulty in parallelizing their state computations. In this work, we propose the Simple Recurrent Unit (SRU), a light recurrent unit that balances model capacity and scalability. SRU is designed to provide expressive recurrence, enable highly parallelized implementation, and comes with careful initialization to facilitate training of deep models. We demonstrate the effectiveness of SRU on multiple NLP tasks. SRU achieves 5--9x speed-up over cuDNN-optimized LSTM on classification and question answering datasets, and delivers stronger results than LSTM and convolutional models. We also obtain an average of 0.7 BLEU improvement over the Transformer model on translation by incorporating SRU into the architecture.
  • Long-distance entanglement distribution is essential both for foundational tests of quantum physics and scalable quantum networks. Owing to channel loss, however, the previously achieved distance was limited to ~100 km. Here, we demonstrate satellite-based distribution of entangled photon pairs to two locations separated by 1203 km on the Earth, through satellite-to-ground two-downlink with a sum of length varies from 1600 km to 2400 km. We observe a survival of two-photon entanglement and a violation of Bell inequality by 2.37+/-0.09 under strict Einstein locality conditions. The obtained effective link efficiency at 1200 km in this work is over 12 orders of magnitude higher than the direct bidirectional transmission of the two photons through the best commercial telecommunication fibers with a loss of 0.16 dB/km.
  • Satellite based quantum communication has been proven as a feasible way to achieve global scale quantum communication network. Very recently, a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite has been launched for this purpose. However, with a single satellite, it takes an inefficient 3-day period to provide the worldwide connectivity. On the other hand, similar to how the Iridium system functions in classic communication, satellite constellation (SC) composed of many quantum satellites, could provide global real-time quantum communication. In such a SC, most of the satellites will work in sunlight. Unfortunately, none of previous ground testing experiments could be implemented at daytime. During daytime, the bright sunlight background prohibits quantum communication in transmission over long distances. In this letter, by choosing a working wavelength of 1550 nm and developing free-space single-mode fibre coupling technology and ultralow noise up-conversion single photon detectors, we overcome the noise due to sunlight and demonstrate a 53-km free space quantum key distribution (QKD) in the daytime through a 48-dB loss channel. Our system not only shows the feasibility of satellite based quantum communication in daylight, but also has the ability to naturally adapt to ground fibre optics, representing an essential step towards a SC-based global quantum network.
  • We present a cluster Gutzwiller mean-field study for ground states and time-evolution dynamics in the Bose-Hubbard ladder (BHL), which can be realized by loading Bose atoms in double-well optical lattices. In our cluster mean-field approach, we treat each double-well unit of two lattice sites as a coherent whole for composing the cluster Gutzwiller ansatz, which may remain some residual correlations in each two-site unit. For a unbiased BHL, in addition to conventional superfluid phase and integer Mott insulator phases, we find that there are exotic fractional insulator phases if the inter-chain tunneling is much stronger than the intra-chain one. The fractional insulator phases can not be found by using a conventional mean-field treatment based upon the single-site Gutzwiller ansatz. For a biased BHL, we find there appear single-atom tunneling and interaction blockade if the system is dominated by the interplay between the on-site interaction and the inter-chain bias. In the many-body Landau-Zener process, in which the inter-chain bias is linearly swept from negative to positive or vice versa, our numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observation [Nat. Phys. \textbf{7}, 61 (2011)]. Our cluster bosonic Gutzwiller treatment is of promising perspectives in exploring exotic quantum phases and time-evolution dynamics of bosonic particles in superlattices.
  • In conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, security is guaranteed by estimating the amount of leaked information through monitoring signal disturbance, which, in practice, is generally caused by environmental noise and device imperfections rather than eavesdropping. Such estimation therefore tends to overrate the amount of leaked information in practice, leads to a fundamental threshold of the bit error rate. The threshold becomes a bottleneck of the development of practical QKD systems. In classical communication, according to Shannon's communication theory, information can transform through a noisy channel even if the background noise is very strong compare to the signal and hence the threshold of the bit error rate tends to 50%. One might wonder whether a QKD scheme can also tolerate error rate as high as 50%. The question is answered affirmatively with the recent work of round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) protocol, which breaks through the fundamental threshold of the bit error rate and indicates another potential direction in the field of quantum cryptography. The key challenge to realize the RRDPS scheme lies on the measurement device, which requires a variable-delay interferometer. The delay needs to be chosen from a set of predetermined values randomly. Such measurement can be realized by switching between many interferometers with different delays at a high speed in accordance with the system repetition rate. The more delay values can be chosen from, the higher error rate can be tolerated. By designing an optical system with multiple switches and employing an active phase stabilization technology, we successfully construct a variable-delay interferometer with 128 actively selectable delays. With this measurement, we experimentally demonstrate the RRDPS QKD protocol and obtain a final key rate of 15.54 bps via a total loss of 18 dB and 8.9% error rate.
  • A new sparse signal recovery algorithm for multiple-measurement vectors (MMV) problem is proposed in this paper. The sparse representation is iteratively drawn based on the idea of zero-point attracting projection (ZAP). In each iteration, the solution is first updated along the negative gradient direction of an approximate $\ell_{2,0}$ norm to encourage sparsity, and then projected to the solution space to satisfy the under-determined equation. A variable step size scheme is adopted further to accelerate the convergence as well as to improve the recovery accuracy. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm exceeds the references in various aspects, as well as when applied to the Modulated Wideband Converter, where recovering MMV problem is crucial to its performance.
  • Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism, we show that the non-equilibrium charge transport in nanoscopic quantum networks takes place via {\it current eigenmodes} that possess characteristic spatial patterns. We identify the microscopic relation between the current patterns and the network's electronic structure and topology and demonstrate that these patterns can be selected via gating or constrictions, providing new venues for manipulating charge transport at the nanoscale. Finally, decreasing the dephasing time leads to a smooth evolution of the current patterns from those of a ballistic quantum network to those of a classical resistor network.
  • In quantum interferometry, it is vital to control and utilize nonlinear interactions for achieving high-precision measurements. Attribute to their long coherent time and high controllability, ultracold atoms including Bose condensed atoms have been widely used for implementing quantum interferometry. Here, we review the recent progresses in theoretical studies of quantum interferometry with Bose condensed atoms. In particular, we focus on the nonlinear phenomena induced by the atom-atom interaction and how to control and utilize these nonlinear phenomena. Under the mean-field description, due to the atom-atom interaction, matter-wave solitons appear in the interference patterns, and macroscopic quantum self-trapping exists in the Bose-Josephson junctions. Under the many-body description, the atom-atom interaction can generate non-classical entanglement, which may be utilized to achieve high-precision measurements beyond the standard quantum limit.
  • We study the non-equilibrium transport properties of a one-dimensional array of dissipative quantum dots. Using the Keldysh formalism, we show that the dots' dissipative nature leads to a spatial variation of the chemical potential, which in disordered arrays, breaks the invariance of the current, I, under bias reversal. Moreover, the array's nanoscopic size results in an algebraic low-temperature dependence of I. Finally, we show that a local Coulomb interaction splits the dots' electronic levels, resulting in a Coulomb blockade, which is softened with increasing dissipation and array size.
  • A Toeplitz matrix is one in which the matrix elements are constant along diagonals. The Fisher-Hartwig matrices are much-studied singular matrices in the Toeplitz family. The matrices are defined for all orders, $N$. They are parametrized by two constants, $\alpha$ and $\beta$. Their spectrum of eigenvalues has a simple asymptotic form in the limit as $N$ goes to infinity. Here we study the structure of their eigenvalues and eigenvectors in this limiting case. We specialize to the case $0<\alpha<|\beta|<1$, where the behavior is particularly simple.
  • We study the asymptotic eigenvalue distribution of Toeplitz matrices generated by a singular symbol. It has been conjectured by Widom that, for a generic symbol, the eigenvalues converge to the image of the symbol. In this paper we ask how the eigenvalues converge to the image. For a given Toeplitz matrix $T_n(a)$ of size $n$, we take the standard approach of looking at $\det(\zeta-T_n(a))$, of which the asymptotic information is given by the Fisher-Hartwig theorem. For a symbol with single jump, we obtain the distribution of eigenvalues as an expansion involving $1/n$ and $\log n/n$. To demonstrate the validity of our result we compare our result against the numerics using a pure Fisher-Hartwig symbol.