• Massive stars blow powerful stellar winds throughout their evolutionary stages from the main sequence to Wolf-Rayet phases. The amount of mechanical energy deposited in the interstellar medium by the wind from a massive star can be comparable to the explosion energy of a core-collapse supernova that detonates at the end of its life. In this study, we estimate the kinetic energy deposition by massive stars in our Galaxy by considering the integrated Galactic initial mass function and modeling the stellar wind luminosity. The mass loss rate and terminal velocity of stellar winds during the main sequence, red supergiant, and Wolf-Rayet stages are estimated by adopting theoretical calculations and observational data published in the literature. We find that the total stellar wind luminosity due to all massive stars in the Galaxy is about $L_w\approx 1.1\times 10^{41}$ erg/s, which is about 1/4 of the power of supernova explosions, $L_{SN} \approx 4.8\times 10^{41}$ erg/s. If we assume that $\sim 1-10$ % of the wind luminosity could be converted to Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) through collisonless shocks such as termination shocks in stellar bubbles and superbubbles, colliding-wind shocks in binaries, and bow-shocks of massive runaway stars, stellar winds might be expected to make a significant contribution to GCR production, though lower than that of supernova remnants.
  • According to structure formation simulations, weak shocks with typical Mach number, $M_{\rm s}\lesssim 3$, are expected to form in merging galaxy clusters. The presence of such shocks has been indicated by X-ray and radio observations of many merging clusters. In particular, diffuse radio sources known as radio relics could be explained by synchrotron-emitting electrons accelerated via diffusive shock acceleration (Fermi I) at quasi-perpendicular shocks. Here we also consider possible roles of stochastic acceleration (Fermi II) by compressive MHD turbulence downstream of the shock. Then we explore a puzzling discrepancy that for some radio relics, the shock Mach number inferred from the radio spectral index is substantially larger than that estimated from X-ray observations. This problem could be understood, if shock surfaces associated with radio relics consist of multiple shocks with different strengths.In that case, X-ray observations tend to pick up the part of shocks with lower Mach numbers and higher kinetic energy flux, while radio emissions come preferentially from the part of shocks with higher Mach numbers and higher cosmic ray (CR) production. We also show that the Fermi I reacceleration model with preexisting fossil electrons supplemented by Fermi II acceleration due to postshock turbulence could reproduce observed profiles of radio flux densities and integrated radio spectra of two giant radio relics. This study demonstrates the CR electrons can be accelerated at collisionless shocks in galaxy clusters just like supernova remnant shock in the interstellar medium and interplanetary shocks in the solar wind.
  • Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that shock waves could be produced in the intergalactic medium by supersonic flow motions during the course of hierarchical clustering of the large-scale-structure in the Universe. Similar to interplanetary shocks and supernova remnants (SNRs), these structure formation shocks can accelerate cosmic ray (CR) protons and electrons via diffusive shock acceleration. External accretion shocks, which form in the outermost surfaces of nonlinear structures, are as strong as SNR shocks and could be potential accelerations sites for high energy CR protons up to $10^{18}$ eV. But it could be difficult to detect their signatures due to extremely low kinetic energy flux associated with those accretion shocks. On the other hand, radiative features of internal shocks in the hot intracluster medium have been identified as temperature and density discontinuities in X-ray observations and diffuse radio emission from accelerated CR electrons. However, the non-detection of gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters due to $\pi^0$ decay still remains to be an outstanding problem.
  • We explore the shock acceleration model for giant radio relics, in which relativistic electrons are accelerated via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) by merger-driven shocks in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. In addition to DSA, turbulent acceleration by compressive MHD mode downstream of the shock is included as well as energy losses of postshock electrons by Coulomb scattering, synchrotron emission, and inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic background radiation. Considering that only a small fraction of merging clusters host radio relics, we favor the reacceleration scenario in which radio relics are generated preferentially when shocks encounter the regions containing low-energy ($\gamma_{\rm e} \lesssim 300$) cosmic ray electrons (CRe). We perform time-dependent DSA simulations of spherically expanding shocks with physical parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic, and calculate the radio synchrotron emission from the accelerated CRe. We find that significant level of postshock turbulent acceleration is required in order to reproduce broad profiles of the observed radio flux densities of the Sausage relic. Moreover, the spectral curvature in the observed integrated radio spectrum can be explained, if the putative shock should have swept up and exited out of the preshock region of fossil CRe about 10~Myr ago.
  • Although many of the observed properties of giant radio relics detected in the outskirts of galaxy clusters can be explained by relativistic electrons accelerated at merger-driven shocks, significant puzzles remain. In the case of the so-called Toothbrush relic, the shock Mach number estimated from X-ray observations ($M_{\rm X}\approx1.2-1.5$) is substantially weaker than that inferred from the radio spectral index ($M_{\rm rad}\approx2.8$).Toward understanding such a discrepancy, we here consider the following diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) models:(1) weak-shock models with $M_{\rm s}\lesssim 2$ and a preexisting population of cosmic-ray electrons (CRe) with a flat energy spectrum,and (2) strong-shock models with $M_{\rm s}\approx3$ and either shock-generated suprathermal electrons or preexisting fossil CRe. We calculate the synchrotron emission from the accelerated CRe, following the time evolution of the electron DSA, and subsequent radiative cooling and postshock turbulent acceleration (TA). We find that both models could reproduce reasonably well the observed integrated radio spectrum of the Toothbrush relic, but the observed broad transverse profile requires the stochastic acceleration by downstream turbulence, which we label "turbulent acceleration" or TA to distinguish it from DSA. Moreover, to account for the almost uniform radio spectral index profile along the length of the relic, the weak-shock models require a preshock region over 400~kpc with a uniform population of preexisting CRe with a high cutoff energy ($\gtrsim 40$ GeV). Due to the short cooling time, it is challenging to explain the origin of such energetic electrons. Therefore, we suggest the strong-shock models with low-energy seed CRe ($\lesssim 150$~MeV) are preferred for the radio observations of this relic.
  • On the largest scales, the Universe consists of voids and filaments making up the cosmic web. Galaxy clusters are located at the knots in this web, at the intersection of filaments. Clusters grow through accretion from these large-scale filaments and by mergers with other clusters and groups. In a growing number of galaxy clusters, elongated Mpc-size radio sources have been found, so-called radio relics. These relics are thought to trace relativistic electrons in the intracluster plasma accelerated by low-Mach number collisionless shocks generated by cluster-cluster merger events. A long-standing problem is how low-Mach number shocks can accelerate electrons so efficiently to explain the observed radio relics. Here we report on the discovery of a direct connection between a radio relic and a radio galaxy in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3411-3412. This discovery indicates that fossil relativistic electrons from active galactic nuclei are re-accelerated at cluster shocks. It also implies that radio galaxies play an important role in governing the non-thermal component of the intracluster medium in merging clusters.
  • The Sausage radio relic is the arc-like radio structure in the cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, whose observed properties can be best understood by synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated at a merger-driven shock. However, there remain a few puzzles that cannot be explained by the shock acceleration model with only in-situ injection. In particular, the Mach number inferred from the observed radio spectral index, $M_{\rm radio}\approx 4.6$, while the Mach number estimated from X-ray observations, $M_{\rm X-ray}\approx 2.7$. In an attempt to resolve such a discrepancy, here we consider the re-acceleration model in which a shock of $M_s\approx 3$ sweeps through the intracluster gas with a pre-existing population of relativistic electrons. We find that observed brightness profiles at multi frequencies provide strong constraints on the spectral shape of pre-existing electrons. The models with a power-law momentum spectrum with the slope, $s\approx 4.1$, and the cutoff Lorentz factor, $\gamma_{e,c}\approx 3-5\times 10^4$ can reproduce reasonably well the observed spatial profiles of radio fluxes and integrated radio spectrum of the Sausage relic. The possible origins of such relativistic electrons in the intracluster medium remain to be investigated further.
  • The Toothbrush radio relic associated the merging cluster 1RXS J060303.3 is presumed to be produced by relativistic electrons accelerated at merger-driven shocks. Since the shock Mach number inferred from the observed radio spectral index, $M_{radio}\approx 2.8$, is larger than that estimated from X-ray observations, $M_{X-ray}\lesssim 1.5$, we consider the re-acceleration model in which a weak shock of $M_s\approx 1.2-1.5$ sweeps through the intracluster plasma with a preshock population of relativistic electrons. We find the models with a power-law momentum spectrum with the slope, $s\approx 4.6$, and the cutoff Lorentz factor, $\gamma_{e,c}\approx 7-8\times 10^4$ can reproduce reasonably well the observed profiles of radio fluxes and integrated radio spectrum of the head portion of the Toothbrush relic. This study confirms the strong connection between the ubiquitous presence of fossil relativistic plasma originated from AGNs and the shock-acceleration model of radio relics in the intracluster medium.
  • In Kang (2015) we calculated the acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons and the ensuing radio synchrotron emission at weak spherical shocks that are expected to form in the outskirts of galaxy clusters.There we demonstrated that, at decelerating spherical shocks, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws predicted for constant planar shocks, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons decrease in time. In this study, we consider spherical blast waves propagating into a constant density core surrounded by an isothermal halo with a decreasing density profile in order to explore how the deceleration rate of the shock speed affects the radio emission from accelerated electrons. The surface brightness profile and the volume-integrated radio spectrum of the model shocks are calculated by assuming a ribbon-like shock surface on a spherical shell and the associated downstream region of relativistic electrons. If the postshock magnetic field strength is about 7 microgauss, at the shock age of ~50 Myr, the volume-integrated radio spectrum steepens gradually with the spectral index from alpha_{inj} to alpha_{inj}+0.5 over 0.1-10 GHz, where alpha_{inj} is the injection index at the shock positionexpected from the diffusive shock acceleration theory. Such gradual steepening could explain the curved radio spectrum of the radio relic in cluster A2266, which was interpreted as a broken power-law by Trasatti et al. (2014), if the relic shock is young enough so that the break frequency falls in around 1 GHz.
  • We study the evolution of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated at spherically expanding shocks with low Mach numbers and the ensuing spectral signatures imprinted in radio synchrotron emission. Time-dependent simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of electrons in the test-particle limit have been performed for spherical shocks with parameters relevant for typical shocks in the intracluster medium. The electron and radiation spectra at the shock location can be described properly by the test-particle DSA predictions with instantaneous shock parameters. However, the volume integrated spectra of both electrons and radiation deviate significantly from the test-particle power-laws, because the shock compression ratio and the flux of injected electrons at the shock gradually decrease as the shock slows down in time.So one needs to be cautious about interpreting observed radio spectra of evolving shocks based on simple DSA models in the test-particle regime.
  • We consider a phenomenological model for the thermal leakage injection in the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process, in which suprathermal protons and electrons near the shock transition zone are assumed to have the so-called $\kappa$-distributions produced by interactions of background thermal particles with pre-existing and/or self-excited plasma/MHD waves or turbulence. The $\kappa$-distribution has a power-law tail, instead of an exponential cutoff, well above the thermal peak momentum. So there are a larger number of potential seed particles with momentum, above that required for participation in the DSA process. As a result, the injection fraction for the $\kappa$-distribution depends on the shock Mach number much less severely compared to that for the Maxwellian distribution. Thus, the existence of $\kappa$-like suprathermal tails at shocks would ease the problem of extremely low injection fractions, especially for electrons and especially at weak shocks such as those found in the intracluster medium. We suggest that the injection fraction for protons ranges $10^{-4}-10^{-3}$ for a $\kappa$-distribution with $10 < \kappa_p < 30$ at quasi-parallel shocks, while the injection fraction for electrons becomes $10^{-6}-10^{-5}$ for a $\kappa$-distribution with $\kappa_e < 2$ at quasi-perpendicular shocks. For such $\kappa$ values the ratio of cosmic ray electrons to protons naturally becomes $K_{e/p}\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-2}$, which is required to explain the observed ratio for Galactic cosmic rays.
  • We explore nonlinear effects of wave-particle interactions on the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in Type Ia-like, SNR blast waves, by implementing phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification, Alfv'enic drift, and particle escape in time-dependent numerical simulations of nonlinear DSA. For typical SNR parameters the CR protons can be accelerated to PeV energies only if the region of amplified field ahead of the shock is extensive enough to contain the diffusion lengths of the particles of interest. Even with the help of Alfv'enic drift, it remains somewhat challenging to construct a nonlinear DSA model for SNRs in which order of 10 % of the supernova explosion energy is converted to the CR energy and the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 10 or so in the shock precursor, while, at the same time, the energy spectrum of PeV protons is steeper than E^{-2}. To explore the influence of these physical effects on observed SNR emissions, we also compute resulting radio-to-gamma-ray spectra. Nonthermal emission spectra, especially in X-ray and gamma-ray bands,depend on the time dependent evolution of CR injection process, magnetic field amplification, and particle escape, as well as the shock dynamic evolution. This result comes from the fact that the high energy end of the CR spectrum is composed of the particles that are injected in the very early stages of blast wave evolution. Thus it is crucial to understand better the plasma wave-particle interactions associated with collisionless shocks in detail modeling of nonthermal radiation from SNRs.
  • We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number Ms, while the MFA factor depends on the Alfv'enic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfv'en speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at ~ 20 % of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with Ms>~ 10. In the test-particle regime (Ms<~ 3), it is expected that the magnetic field is not amplified and the Alfv'enic drift effects are insignificant, although relevant plasma physical processes at low Mach number shocks remain largely uncertain.
  • We explore how wave-particle interactions affect diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at astrophysical shocks by performing time-dependent kinetic simulations, in which phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvenic drift, thermal leakage injection, Bohm-like diffusion, and a free escape boundary are implemented. If the injection fraction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles is greater than 2x10^{-4}, for the shock parameters relevant for young supernova remnants, DSA is efficient enough to develop a significant shock precursor due to CR feedback, and magnetic field can be amplified up to a factor of 20 via CR streaming instability in the upstream region. If scattering centers drift with Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum can be steepened significantly and the acceleration efficiency is reduced. Nonlinear DSA with self-consistent MFA and Alfvenic drift predicts that the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at 10 % of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with a sonic Mach number ranging 20< M_s< 100. Since the amplified magnetic field follows the flow modification in the precursor, the low energy end of the particle spectrum is softened much more than the high energy end. As a result, the concave curvature in the energy spectra does not disappear entirely even with the help of Alfvenic drift. For shocks with a moderate Alfven Mach number (M_A<10), the accelerated CR spectrum can become as steep as E^{-2.1}-E^{-2.3}, which is more consistent with the observed CR spectrum and gamma-ray photon spectrum of several young supernova remnants.
  • Recent radio observations have identified a class of structures, so-called radio relics, in clusters of galaxies. The radio emission from these sources is interpreted as synchrotron radiation from GeV electrons gyrating in microG-level magnetic fields. Radio relics, located mostly in the outskirts of clusters, seem to associate with shock waves, especially those developed during mergers. In fact, they seem to be good structures to identify and probe such shocks in intracluster media (ICMs), provided we understand the electron acceleration and re-acceleration at those shocks. In this paper, we describe time-dependent simulations for diffusive shock acceleration at weak shocks that are expected to be found in ICMs. Freshly injected as well as pre-existing populations of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons are considered, and energy losses via synchrotron and inverse Compton are included. We then compare the synchrotron flux and spectral distributions estimated from the simulations with those in two well-observed radio relics in CIZA J2242.8+5301 and ZwCl0008.8+5215. Considering that the CR electron injection is rather inefficient at weak shocks with Mach number M <~ a few, the existence of radio relics could indicate the pre-existing population of low-energy CR electrons in ICMs. The implication of our results on the merger shock scenario of radio relics is discussed.
  • We performed kinetic simulations of diffusive shock acceleration in Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) expanding into a uniform interstellar medium (ISM). The preshock gas temperature is the primary parameter that governs the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration, while magnetic field strength and CR injection rate are secondary parameters. SNRs in the hot ISM, with an injection fraction smaller than 10^{-4}, are inefficient accelerators with less than 10 % energy getting converted to CRs. The shock structure is almost test-particle like and the ensuing CR spectrum can be steeper than E^{-2}. Although the particles can be accelerated to the knee energy of 10^{15.5}Z eV with amplified magnetic fields in the precursor, Alfv'enic drift of scattering centers softens the source spectrum as steep as E^{-2.1} and reduces the CR acceleration efficiency.
  • We present calculations of expected continuum emissions from Sedov-Taylor phase Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs), using the energy spectra of cosmic ray (CR) electrons and protons from nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) simulations. A new, general-purpose radiative process code, Cosmicp, was employed to calculate the radiation expected from CR electrons and protons and their secondary products. These radio, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are generally consistent with current observations of Type Ia SNRs. The emissions from electrons in these models dominate the radio through X-ray bands. Decays of \pi^0 s from p-p collisions mostly dominate the gamma-ray range, although for a hot, low density ISM case (n_{ISM}=0.003 cm^{-3}), the pion decay contribution is reduced sufficiently to reveal the inverse Compton contribution to TeV gamma-rays. In addition, we present simple scalings for the contributing emission processes to allow a crude exploration of model parameter space, enabling these results to be used more broadly. We also discuss the radial surface brightness profiles expected for these model SNRs in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands.
  • Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) refer to cosmic rays with energy above 10^{18} eV. UHECR experiments utilize simulations of extensive air shower to estimate the properties of UHECRs. The Telescope Array (TA) experiment employs the Monte Carlo codes of CORSIKA and COSMOS to obtain EAS simulations. In this paper, we compare the results of the simulations obtained from CORSIKA and COSMOS and report differences between them in terms of the longitudinal distribution, Xmax-value, calorimetric energy, and energy spectrum at ground.
  • We calculate the energy spectra of cosmic ray (CR) protons and electrons at a plane shock with quasi-parallel magnetic fields, using time-dependent, diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) simulations, including energy losses via synchrotron emission and Inverse Compton (IC) scattering. A thermal leakage injection model and a Bohm type diffusion coefficient are adopted. The electron spectrum at the shock becomes steady after the DSA energy gains balance the synchrotron/IC losses, and it cuts off at the equilibrium momentum p_{eq}. In the postshock region the cutoff momentum of the electron spectrum decreases with the distance from the shock due to the energy losses and the thickness of the spatial distribution of electrons scales as p^{-1}. Thus the slope of the downstream integrated spectrum steepens by one power of p for p_{br}<p<p_{eq}, where the break momentum decrease with the shock age as p_{br}\propto t^{-1}. In a CR modified shock, both the proton and electron spectrum exhibit a concave curvature and deviate from the canonical test-particle power-law, and the upstream integrated electron spectrum could dominate over the downstream integrated spectrum near the cutoff momentum. Thus the spectral shape near the cutoff of X-ray synchrotron emission could reveal a signature of nonlinear DSA.
  • We examine diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of the pre-exisiting as well as freshly injected populations of nonthermal, cosmic-ray (CR) particles at weak cosmological shocks. Assuming simple models for thermal leakage injection and Alfv\'enic drift, we derive analytic, time-dependent solutions for the two populations of CRs accelerated in the test-particle regime. We then compare them with the results from kinetic DSA simulations for shock waves that are expected to form in intracluster media and cluster outskirts in the course of large-scale structure formation. We show that the test-particle solutions provide a good approximation for the pressure and spectrum of CRs accelerated at these weak shocks. Since the injection is extremely inefficient at weak shocks, the pre-existing CR population dominates over the injected population. If the pressure due to pre-existing CR protons is about 5 % of the gas thermal pressure in the upstream flow, the downstream CR pressure can absorb typically a few to 10 % of the shock ram pressure at shocks with the Mach number $M \la 3$. Yet, the re-acceleration of CR electrons can result in a substantial synchrotron emission behind the shock. The enhancement in synchrotron radiation across the shock is estimated to be about a few to several for $M \sim 1.5$ and $10^2-10^3$ for $M \sim 3$, depending on the detail model parameters. The implication of our findings for observed bright radio relics is discussed.
  • We examine the test-particle solution for diffusive shock acceleration, based on simple models for thermal leakage injection and Alfv'enic drift. The critical injection rate, \xi_c, above which the cosmic ray (CR) pressure becomes dynamically significant, depends mainly on the sonic shock Mach number, M, and preshock gas temperature, T_1. In the hot-phase interstellar medium (ISM) and intracluster medium, \xi_c < 10^{-3} for shocks with M < 5, while \xi_c ~ 10^{-4}(T_1/10^6 K)^{1/2} for shocks with M > 10. For T_1=10^6 K, for example, the test-particle solution would be valid if the injection momentum, p_{inj} > 3.8 p_{th}. This leads to the postshock CR pressure less than 10% of the shock ram pressure. If the Alfv'en speed is comparable to the sound speed in the preshock flow, as in the hot-phase ISM, the power-law slope of CR spectrum can be significantly softer than the canonical test-particle slope. Then the CR spectrum at the shock can be approximated by the revised test-particle power-law with an exponential cutoff at the highest accelerated momentum, p_{max}(t). An analytic form of the exponential cutoff is also suggested.
  • We provide a both qualitative and quantitative comparison among different approaches aimed to solve the problem of non-linear diffusive acceleration of particles at shocks. In particular, we show that state-of-the-art models (numerical, Monte Carlo and semi-analytical), even if based on different physical assumptions and implementations, for typical environmental parameters lead to very consistent results in terms of shock hydrodynamics, cosmic ray spectrum and also escaping flux spectrum and anisotropy. Strong points and limits of each approach are also discussed, as a function of the problem one wants to study.
  • We perform kinetic simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) expanding into a uniform interstellar medium (ISM). Bohm-like diffusion assumed, and simple models for Alfvenic drift and dissipation are adopted. Phenomenological models for thermal leakage injection are considered as well. We find that the preshock gas temperature is the primary parameter that governs the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration efficiency and energy spectrum, while the CR injection rate is a secondary parameter. For SNRs in the warm ISM, if the injection fraction is larger than 10^{-4}, the DSA is efficient enough to convert more than 20 % of the SN explosion energy into CRs and the accelerated CR spectrum exhibits a concave curvature flattening to E^{-1.6}. Such a flat source spectrum near the knee energy, however, may not be reconciled with the CR spectrum observed at Earth. On the other hand, SNRs in the hot ISM, with an injection fraction smaller than 10^{-4}, are inefficient accelerators with less than 10 % of the explosion energy getting converted to CRs. Also the shock structure is almost test-particle like and the ensuing CR spectrum can be steeper than E^{-2}. With amplified magnetic field strength of order of 30 microG, Alfven waves generated by the streaming instability may drift upstream fast enough to make the modified test-particle power-law as steep as E^{-2.3}, which is more consistent with the observed CR spectrum.
  • We use kinetic simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) to study the time-dependent evolution of plane, quasi-parallel, cosmic-ray (CR) modified shocks. Thermal leakage injection of low energy CRs and finite Alfv\'en wave propagation and dissipation are included. Bohm diffusion as well as the diffusion with the power-law momentum dependence are modeled. As long as the acceleration time scale to relativistic energies is much shorter than the dynamical evolution time scale of the shocks, the precursor and subshock transition approach the time-asymptotic state, which depends on the shock sonic and Alfv\'enic Mach numbers and the CR injection efficiency. For the diffusion models we employ, the shock precursor structure evolves in an approximately self-similar fashion, depending only on the similarity variable, x/(u_s t). During this self-similar stage, the CR distribution at the subshock maintains a characteristic form as it evolves: the sum of two power-laws with the slopes determined by the subshock and total compression ratios with an exponential cutoff at the highest accelerated momentum, p_{max}(t). Based on the results of the DSA simulations spanning a range of Mach numbers, we suggest functional forms for the shock structure parameters, from which the aforementioned form of CR spectrum can be constructed. These analytic forms may represent approximate solutions to the DSA problem for astrophysical shocks during the self-similar evolutionary stage as well as during the steady-state stage if p_{max} is fixed.
  • If ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) originate from extragalactic sources, understanding the propagation of charged particles through the magnetized large scale structure (LSS) of the universe is crucial in the search for the astrophysical accelerators. Based on a novel model of the turbulence dynamo, we estimate the intergalactic magnetic fields (IGMFs) in cosmological simulations of the formation of the LSS. Under the premise that the sources of UHECRs are strongly associated with the LSS, we consider a model in which protons with E >10^{19} eV are injected by sources that represent active galactic nuclei located inside clusters of galaxies. With the model IGMFs, we then follow the trajectories of the protons, while taking into account the energy losses due to interactions with the cosmic background radiation. For observers located inside groups of galaxies like ours, about 70% and 35% of UHECR events above 60 EeV arrive within ~15 degree and ~5 degree, respectively, of the source position with time delays of less than ~10^7 yr. This implies that the arrival direction of super-GZK protons might exhibit a correlation with the distribution of cosmological sources on the sky. In this model, nearby sources (within 10 - 20 Mpc) should contribute significantly to the particle flux above ~10^{20} eV.