• We present a catalogue of ALMA flux density measurements of 754 calibrators observed between August 2012 and September 2017, for a total of 16,263 observations in different bands and epochs. The flux densities were measured reprocessing the ALMA images generated in the framework of the ALMACAL project, with a new code developed by the Italian node of the European ALMA Regional Centre. A search in the online databases yielded redshift measurements for 589 sources ($\sim$78 per cent of the total). Almost all sources are flat-spectrum, based on their low-frequency spectral index, and have properties consistent with being blazars of different types. To illustrate the properties of the sample we show the redshift and flux density distributions as well as the distributions of the number of observations of individual sources and of time spans in the source frame for sources observed in bands 3 (84$-$116 GHz) and 6 (211$-$275 GHz). As examples of the scientific investigations allowed by the catalogue we briefly discuss the variability properties of our sources in ALMA bands 3 and 6 and the frequency spectra between the effective frequencies of these bands. We find that the median variability index steadily increases with the source-frame time lag increasing from 100 to 800 days, and that the frequency spectra of BL Lacs are significantly flatter than those of flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also show the global spectral energy distributions of our sources over 17 orders of magnitude in frequency.
  • For a sample of star forming galaxies in the redshift interval 0.15$<$z$<$0.3, we study how both the relative strength of the AGN infra-red emission, compared to that due to the star formation (SF), and the numerical fraction of AGNs, change as a function of the total stellar mass of the hosting galaxy group (M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}}$), between $10^{10.25}$ and $10^{11.9}$M$_{\odot}$. Using a multi-component SED fitting analysis, we separate the contribution of stars, AGN torus and star formation to the total emission at different wavelengths. This technique is applied to a new multi-wavelength data-set in the SIMES field (23 not redundant photometric bands), spanning the wavelength range from the UV (GALEX) to the far-IR (Herschel) and including crucial AKARI and WISE mid-IR observations (4.5 \mu m$<\lambda<$24 \mu m), where the BH thermal emission is stronger. This new photometric catalog, that includes our best photo-z estimates, is released through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). Groups are identified through a friends of friends algorithm ($\sim$62% purity, $\sim$51% completeness). We identified a total of 45 galaxies requiring an AGN emission component, 35 of which in groups and 10 in the field. We find BHAR$\propto ($M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}})^{1.21\pm0.27}$ and (BHAR/SFR)$\propto ($M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}})^{1.04\pm0.24}$ while, in the same range of M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}}$, we do not observe any sensible change in the numerical fraction of AGNs. Our results indicate that the nuclear activity (i.e. the BHAR and the BHAR/SFR ratio) is enhanced when galaxies are located in more massive and richer groups.
  • We present the Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) field. The large area covered (7.7 deg$^2$), together with one of the lowest Galactic cirrus emissions in the entire sky and a very extensive coverage by Spitzer, Herschel, Akari, and GALEX, make the SIMES field ideal for extragalactic studies. The elongated geometry of the SIMES area ($\approx$4:1), allowing for a significant cosmic variance reduction, further improves the quality of statistical studies in this field. Here we present the reduction and photometric measurements of the Spitzer/IRAC data. The survey reaches a depth of 1.93 and 1.75 $\mu$Jy (1$\sigma$) at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m, respectively. We discuss the multiwavelength IRAC--based catalog, completed with optical, mid-- and far--IR observations. We detect 341,000 sources with F$_{3.6\mu m} \geq 3\sigma$. Of these, 10% have an associated 24 $\mu$m counterpart, while 2.7% have an associated SPIRE source. We release the catalog through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). Two scientific applications of these IRAC data are presented in this paper: first we compute integral number counts at 3.6 $\mu$m. Second, we use the [3.6]--[4.5] color index to identify galaxy clusters at z$>$1.3. We select 27 clusters in the full area, a result consistent with previous studies at similar depth.
  • We combined the spectroscopic information from the 3D-HST survey with \textit{Herschel} data to characterize the H$\alpha$ dust attenuation properties of a sample of 79 main sequence star-forming galaxies at $z \sim 1$ in the GOODS-S field. The sample was selected in the far-IR, at $\lambda$=100 and/or 160 $\mu$m, and only includes galaxies with a secure H$\alpha$ detection (S/N$>$3). From the low resolution 3D-HST spectra we measured the redshifts and the H$\alpha$ fluxes for the whole sample (a factor of 1/1.2 was applied to the observed fluxes to remove the [NII] contamination). The stellar masses (M$_{\star}$), infrared (L$_{IR}$) and UV luminosities (L$_{UV}$) were derived from the SEDs by fitting multi-band data from GALEX near-UV to SPIRE 500 $\mu$m. We estimated the continuum extinction E$_{star}$(B-V) from both the IRX=L$_{IR}$/L$_{UV}$ ratio and the UV-slope, $\beta$, and found an excellent agreement between the two. The nebular extinction was estimated from comparison of the observed SFR$_{H\alpha}$ and SFR$_{UV}$. We obtained \emph{f}=E$_{star}$(B-V)/E$_{neb}$(B-V)=0.93$\pm$0.06, i.e. higher than the canonical value of \emph{f}=0.44 measured in the local Universe. Our derived dust correction produces good agreement between the H$\alpha$ and IR+UV SFRs for galaxies with SFR$\gtrsim$ 20 M$_{\odot}$/yr and M$_{\star} \gtrsim 5 \times 10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, while objects with lower SFR and M$_{\star}$ seem to require a smaller \emph{f}-factor (i.e. higher H$\alpha$ extinction correction). Our results then imply that the nebular extinction for our sample is comparable to that in the optical-UV continuum and suggest that the \emph{f}-factor is a function of both M$_{\star}$ and SFR, in agreement with previous studies.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the COSMOS field using the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS), a near-infrared instrument on the Subaru Telescope. Our survey is specifically designed to detect the Halpha emission line that falls within the H-band (1.6-1.8 um) spectroscopic window from star-forming galaxies with 1.4 < z < 1.7 and M_stellar>~10^10 Msolar. With the high multiplex capability of FMOS, it is now feasible to construct samples of over one thousand galaxies having spectroscopic redshifts at epochs that were previously challenging. The high-resolution mode (R~2600) effectively separates Halpha and [NII]6585 thus enabling studies of the gas-phase metallicity and photoionization state of the interstellar medium. The primary aim of our program is to establish how star formation depends on stellar mass and environment, both recognized as drivers of galaxy evolution at lower redshifts. In addition to the main galaxy sample, our target selection places priority on those detected in the far-infrared by Herschel/PACS to assess the level of obscured star formation and investigate, in detail, outliers from the star formation rate - stellar mass relation. Galaxies with Halpha detections are followed up with FMOS observations at shorter wavelengths using the J-long (1.11-1.35 um) grating to detect Hbeta and [OIII]5008 that provides an assessment of extinction required to measure star formation rates not hampered by dust, and an indication of embedded Active Galactic Nuclei. With 460 redshifts measured from 1153 spectra, we assess the performance of the instrument with respect to achieving our goals, discuss inherent biases in the sample, and detail the emission-line properties. Our higher-level data products, including catalogs and spectra, are available to the community.
  • We investigate the co-evolution of black-hole-accretion-rate (BHAR) and star-formation-rate (SFR) in $1.5<z<2.5$ galaxies displaying a greater diversity of star-forming properties compared to previous studies. We combine X-ray stacking and far-IR photometry of stellar mass-limited samples of normal star-forming, starburst and quiescent/quenched galaxies in the COSMOS field. We corroborate the existence of a strong correlation between BHAR (i.e. the X-ray luminosity, L_X), and stellar mass (M*) for normal star-forming galaxies, although find a steeper relation than previously reported. We find that starbursts show a factor of 3 enhancement in BHAR compared to normal SF galaxies (against a factor of 6 excess in SFR), while quiescents show a deficit of a factor 5.5 at a given mass. One possible interpretation of this is that the starburst phase does not coincide with cosmologically relevant BH growth, or that starburst-inducing mergers are more efficient at boosting SFR than BHAR. Contrary to studies based on smaller samples, we find the BHAR/SFR ratio of main sequence (MS) galaxies is not mass invariant, but scales weakly as M*^(0.43\pm0.09}, implying faster BH growth in more massive galaxies at $z\sim2$. Furthermore, BHAR/SFR during the starburst is a factor of 2 lower than in MS galaxies, at odds with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations of merger galaxies that foresee a sudden enhancement of L_X/SFR during the merger. Finally, we estimate that the bulk of the accretion density of the Universe at $z\sim2$ is associated with normal star-forming systems, with only 6(+/-1)% and 11(+/-1)% associated with starburst and quiescent galaxies, respectively.
  • We compare various star formation rate (SFR) indicators for star-forming galaxies at $1.4<z<2.5$ in the COSMOS field. The main focus is on the SFRs from the far-IR (PACS-Herschel data) with those from the ultraviolet, for galaxies selected according to the BzK criterion. FIR-selected samples lead to a vastly different slope of the SFR-stellar mass ($M_*$) relation, compared to that of the dominant main sequence population as measured from the UV, since the FIR selection picks predominantly only a minority of outliers. However, there is overall agreement between the main sequences derived with the two SFR indicators, when stacking on the PACS maps the BzK-selected galaxies. The resulting logarithmic slope of the SFR-{$M_*$} relation is $\sim0.8-0.9$, in agreement with that derived from the dust-corrected UV-luminosity. Exploiting deeper 24$\mu$m-Spitzer data we have characterized a sub-sample of galaxies with reddening and SFRs poorly constrained, as they are very faint in the $B$ band. The combination of Herschel with Spitzer data have allowed us to largely break the age/reddening degeneracy for these intriguing sources, by distinguishing whether a galaxy is very red in B-z because of being heavily dust reddened, or whether because star formation has been (or is being) quenched. Finally, we have compared our SFR(UV) to the SFRs derived by stacking the radio data and to those derived from the H$\alpha$ luminosity of a sample of star-forming galaxies at $1.4<z<1.7$. The two sets of SFRs are broadly consistent as they are with the SFRs derived from the UV and by stacking the corresponding PACS data in various mass bins.
  • Star formation in massive galaxies is quenched at some point during hierarchical mass assembly. To understand where and when the quenching processes takes place, we study the evolution of the total star formation rate per unit total halo mass (\Sigma(SFR/M)) in three different mass scales: low mass halos (field galaxies), groups, and clusters, up to a redshift ~1.6. We use deep far-infrared PACS data at 100 and 160 um to accurately estimate the total star formation rate of the Luminous Infrared Galaxy population of 9 clusters with mass ~10^{15} M_{\odot}, and 9 groups/poor clusters with mass ~ 5 x 10^{13} M_{\odot}. Estimates of the field \Sigma(SFR/M) are derived from the literature, by dividing the star formation rate density by the mean comoving matter density of the universe. The field \Sigma(SFR/M) increases with redshift up to z~1 and it is constant thereafter. The evolution of the \Sigma(SFR/M)-z relation in galaxy systems is much faster than in the field. Up to redshift z~0.2, the field has a higher \Sigma(SFR/M) than galaxy groups and galaxy clusters. At higher redshifts, galaxy groups and the field have similar \Sigma(SFR/M), while massive clusters have significantly lower \Sigma(SFR/M) than both groups and the field. There is a hint of a reversal of the SFR activity vs. environment at z~1.6, where the group \Sigma(SFR/M) lies above the field \Sigma(SFR/M)-z relation. We discuss possible interpretations of our results in terms of the processes of downsizing, and star-formation quenching.
  • Two main modes of star formation are know to control the growth of galaxies: a relatively steady one in disk-like galaxies, defining a tight star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass sequence, and a starburst mode in outliers to such a sequence which is generally interpreted as driven by merging. Such starburst galaxies are rare but have much higher SFRs, and it is of interest to establish the relative importance of these two modes. PACS/Herschel observations over the whole COSMOS and GOODS-South fields, in conjunction with previous optical/near-IR data, have allowed us to accurately quantify for the first time the relative contribution of the two modes to the global SFR density in the redshift interval 1.5<z<2.5, i.e., at the cosmic peak of the star formation activity. The logarithmic distributions of galaxy SFRs at fixed stellar mass are well described by Gaussians, with starburst galaxies representing only a relatively minor deviation that becomes apparent for SFRs more than 4 times higher than on the main sequence. Such starburst galaxies represent only 2% of mass-selected star forming galaxies and account for only 10% of the cosmic SFR density at z~2. Only when limited to SFR>1000M(sun)/yr, off-sequence sources significantly contribute to the SFR density (46+/-20%). We conclude that merger-driven starbursts play a relatively minor role for the formation of stars in galaxies, whereas they may represent a critical phase towards the quenching of star formation and morphological transformation in galaxies.