• Cadmium arsenide (Cd3As2) has recently became conspicuous in solid-state physics due to several reports proposing that it hosts a pair of symmetry-protected 3D Dirac cones. Despite vast investigations, a solid experimental insight into the band structure of this material is still missing. Here we fill one of the existing gaps in our understanding of Cd3As2, and based on our Landau level spectroscopy study, we provide an estimate for the energy scale of 3D Dirac electrons in this system. We find that the appearance of such charge carriers is limited - contrary to a widespread belief in the solid-state community - to a relatively small energy scale (below 40 meV).
  • We report the detailed optical properties of Cd$_3$As$_2$ crystals in a wide parameter space: temperature, magnetic field, carrier concentration and crystal orientation. We investigate high-quality crystals synthesized by three different techniques. In all the studied samples, independently of how they were prepared and how they were treated before the optical experiments, our data indicate conspicuous fluctuations in the carrier density (up to 30%). These charge puddles have a characteristic scale of 100 $\mu$m, they become more pronounced at low temperatures, and possibly, they become enhanced by the presence of crystal twinning. The Drude response is characterized by very small scattering rates ($\sim 1$ meV) for as-grown samples. Mechanical treatment, such as cutting or polishing, influences the optical properties of single crystals, by increasing the Drude scattering rate and also modifying the high frequency optical response. Magneto-reflectivity and Kerr rotation are consistent with electron-like charge carriers and a spatially non-uniform carrier density.
  • We here report a detailed high-pressure infrared transmission study of BiTeCl and BiTeBr. We follow the evolution of two band transitions: the optical excitation $\beta$ between two Rashba-split conduction bands, and the absorption $\gamma$ across the band gap. In the low pressure range, $p< 4$~GPa, for both compounds $\beta$ is approximately constant with pressure and $\gamma$ decreases, in agreement with band structure calculations. In BiTeCl, a clear pressure-induced phase transition at 6~GPa leads to a different ground state. For BiTeBr, the pressure evolution is more subtle, and we discuss the possibility of closing and reopening of the band gap. Our data is consistent with a Weyl phase in BiTeBr at 5$-$6~GPa, followed by the onset of a structural phase transition at 7~GPa.
  • We report on optical reflectivity experiments performed on Cd3As2 over a broad range of photon energies and magnetic fields. The observed response clearly indicates the presence of 3D massless charge carriers. The specific cyclotron resonance absorption in the quantum limit implies that we are probing massless Kane electrons rather than symmetry-protected 3D Dirac particles. The latter may appear at a smaller energy scale and are not directly observed in our infrared experiments.
  • We report on absolute magneto-transmission experiments on highly-doped quasi-free-standing epitaxial graphene targeting the classical-to-quantum crossover of the cyclotron resonance. This study allows us to directly extract the carrier density and also other relevant quantities such as the quasiparticle velocity and the Drude weight, which is precisely measured from the strength of the cyclotron resonance. We find that the Drude weight is renormalized with respect to its non-interacting (or random-phase-approximation) value and that the renormalization is tied to the quasiparticle velocity enhancement. This finding is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions, which attribute the renormalization of the Drude weight in graphene to the interplay between broken Galilean invariance and electron-electron interactions.
  • We show that in graphene epitaxially grown on SiC the Drude absorption is transformed into a strong terahertz plasmonic peak due to natural nanoscale inhomogeneities, such as substrate terraces and wrinkles. The excitation of the plasmon modifies dramatically the magneto-optical response and in particular the Faraday rotation. This makes graphene a unique playground for plasmon-controlled magneto-optical phenomena thanks to a cyclotron mass 2 orders of magnitude smaller than in conventional plasmonic materials such as noble metals.
  • Far-infrared diagonal and Hall conductivities of multilayer epitaxial graphene on the C-face of SiC were measured using magneto-optical absorption and Faraday rotation in magnetic fields up to 7 T and temperatures between 5 and 300 K. Multiple components are identified in the spectra, which include: (i) a quasi-classical cyclotron resonance (CR), originating from the highly doped graphene layer closest to SiC, (ii) transitions between low-index Landau levels (LLs), which stem from weakly doped layers and (iii) a broad optical absorption background. Electron and hole type LL transitions are optically distinguished and shown to coexist. An electron-hole asymmetry of the Fermi velocity of about 2% was found within one graphene layer, while the Fermi velocity varies by about 10% across the layers. The optical intensity of the LL transitions is several times smaller than what is theoretically expected for isolated graphene monolayers without electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions.
  • We show an example of a purely magnetic spin resonance in EuTiO3 and the resulting new record high Faraday rotation of 590 deg/mm at 1.6 T for 1 cm wavelengths probed by a novel technique of magneto-optical GHz time-domain ellipsometry. From our transmission measurements of linear polarized light we map out the complex index of refraction in the GHz to THz range. We observe a strong resonant absorption by magnetic dipole transitions involving the Zeeman split S=7/2 magnetic energy levels of the Eu 2+ ions, which causes a very large dichroism for circular polarized radiation.
  • We observe a giant increase of the infrared intensity and a softening of the in-plane antisymmetric phonon mode Eu (~0.2 eV) in bilayer graphene as a function of the gate-induced doping. The phonon peak has a pronounced Fano-like asymmetry. We suggest that the intensity growth and the softening originate from the coupling of the phonon mode to the narrow electronic transition between parallel bands of the same character, while the asymmetry is due to the interaction with the continuum of transitions between the lowest hole and electron bands. The growth of the peak is a manifestation of the "charged-phonon" effect observed previously in organic chain conductors and doped fullerenes, which can now be tuned with the gate voltage.
  • We present a compelling evidence for the opening of a bandgap in exfoliated bottom-gated bilayer graphene by fitting the gate-voltage modulated infrared reflectivity spectra in a large range of doping levels with a tight-binding model and the Kubo formula. A close quantitative agreement between the experimental and calculated spectra is achieved, allowing us to determine self-consistently the full set of Slonczewski-Weiss-McClure tight-binding parameters together with the gate-voltage dependent bandgap. The doping dependence of the bandgap shows a good agreement with the existing calculations that take the effects of self-screening into account. We also identify certain mismatches between the tight-binding model and the data, which can be related to electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions.